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ISBN:0061881775
Author: Ghita Schwarz
ISBN13: 978-0061881770
Title: Displaced Persons: A Novel
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ePUB size: 1351 kb
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Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (August 23, 2011)
Pages: 368

Displaced Persons: A Novel by Ghita Schwarz



Author: Ghita Schwarz. In May 1945, Pavel Mandl, a Polish Jew recently liberated from a concentration camp, lands near a displaced persons camp in the British occupation zone of newly defeated Germany. Alone, possessing nothing but a map, a few tins of food, a toothbrush, and his identity papers, he must scrape together a new life in a chaotic community of refugees, civilians, and soldiers. In Displaced Persons, Ghita Schwarz reveals the interior despairs and joys of immigrants shaped by war – ordinary men and women who have lived through cataclysmic times – and illuminates changing cultural understandings of trauma and remembrance.

In Displaced Persons, Ghita Schwarz reveals the interior despairs and joys of immigrants shaped by war-ordinary men and women who have lived through cataclysmic times-and illuminates changing cultural understandings of trauma and remembrance. Ghita Schwartz's novel, "Displaced Persons," is a powerful work centering on well-developed characters who are DPs who go about attempting to reconstruct and rebuild their destroyed existences.

In Displaced Persons, Ghita Schwarz reveals the interior despairs and joys of immigrants shaped by war – ordinary men and women who have lived through cataclysmic times – and illuminates changing cultural understandings of trauma and remembrance. en. Fiction Book Designer 0. 1. For my mother and father. I hear that the axe has flowered, I hear that the place can’t be named, I hear that the bread which looks at him heals the hanged man, the bread baked for him by his wife, I hear that they call life.

Read "Displaced Persons A Novel" by Ghita Schwarz with Rakuten Kobo. This is an amazing novel  . Anne Roiphe, National Book Award-winning author of Fruitful. An astonishing tale of grief and anger, memory and survival, Displaced Persons marks the arrival of a supremely gifted new literary talent, Ghita Schwarz. Schwarz’s powerful story of a group of Holocaust survivors- displaced persons -struggling to remake their lives and cope with the stigma of their pasts in the wake of the monumental Nazi horror is beautiful, tragic, moving, and unforgettable, chronicling the lives of ordinary people who have suffered under extraordinary circumstances.

Ghita Schwarz poignantly reminds us that history chases us even if we run from it and that memory ensnares us wherever we turn. Joshua Henkin, author of the New York Times Notable Book, Matrimony.

Displaced Persons Schwarz Ghita HarperCollins USA 9780061881770 : In May 1945, Pavel Mandl, a Polish Jew recently liberated from a concentration camp, finds himself among similarly displac. Ghita Schwarzs Displaced Persons is an astonishing novel of grief, anger, and survival that examines the landscape of liberation and reveals the interior despairs and joys of immigrants shaped by war and trauma. Описание: To the People of New York City

Ghita Schwarz’s Displaced Persons is an astonishing novel of grief, anger, and survival that examines the landscape of liberation and reveals the interior despairs and joys of immigrants shaped by war and trauma  . Displaced Persons is an amazing book about strong and inspiring characters who have experienced profound tragedy but survive to build lives they can be proud of. Ms. Schwarz's characters are not mythical creatures but real human beings with major flaws and inspiring characteristics.

Read Book Displaced Persons: A Novel Fully free! This is an amazing novel.

“This is an amazing novel. The writing is piercing and clear, and the humanity of the author and her characters will inhabit my thoughts for years to come.”—Anne Roiphe, National Book Award-winning author of Fruitful

 

An astonishing tale of grief and anger, memory and survival, Displaced Persons marks the arrival of a supremely gifted new literary talent, Ghita Schwarz. Schwarz’s powerful story of a group of Holocaust survivors—“displaced persons”—struggling to remake their lives and cope with the stigma of their pasts in the wake of the monumental Nazi horror is beautiful, tragic, moving, and unforgettable, chronicling the lives of ordinary people who have suffered under extraordinary circumstances.

Reviews: 7
Brannylv
Displaced Persons by Ghita Schwarz is different from any other holocoaust related novel I have ever read. The stories we often see are of the horrors and the herosim of the time. But Schwarz's novel deals with the heroism of the every day after the war, ordinary people struggling with ordinary things, wanted nothing more than normalcy for themselves and later for their children. There is always something bubbling the beneath the surface, and the result is a story that really draws you into the characters. There are of course many references to wartime but these little bits of history are there to explain the present, to remind us that Pavel, Chaim, Sima and Fela live through each day with these pieces in them at the gorcery store, in the comforts of their own home, at work. We live in a world where everyone wants to be famous for nothing, make money off landing in something extraordinary, and it was so moving to see characters who wanted nothing more than to carve out a productive life that is wonderfully mundane, an impossible task given who they are. Displaced Person is one of those books that stays with you long after the last page.
Aradwyn
I was absorbed into this book from the first page. I had not know much at all about the DP camps and found that fascinating and very sad. Their lives in America rang very true for the survivors and children of survivors I've known--all seemed normal on the outside, but underneath the sorrow, anxiety, and fear never go away.
Virn
The first half about the hardships in Europe was good, then the bickering and pettiness of life in NYC became too much.
Macill
I liked that this book had a different spin on the Holcaust story, but this story was depressing for most of the novel.
Mananara
Perhaps I am judging unfairly, but after reading "The Invisible Bridge", I found "Displaced persons" lacking, partially on the content but mainly in the characters. Most were unsympathetic despite the horror of being holocaust survivors, lacking depth and being fairly one-dimensional. In "Invisible Bridge" each character was truly brought to life and I found myself thinking of each of them and their personal dilemnas often throughout the day, whereas the characters in "Displaced Persons" were basically forgettable.

I would not recommend this book, but would highly recommend "The Invisible Bridge."
Whitesmasher
The anniversary of the Holocaust has brought us a number of memorable and revealing stories of the lives of Jews during this period. Displaced Persons offers yet another viewpoint--that of Polish Jews. Although their unique story is the main impression I will carry away, the carefully described details of family lives and traditions will also remain with me. Quite a moving tale.
Wenyost
In the aftermath of the Holocaust when the Allied Forces liberated the concentration camps, the survivors were all marked and scarred for life. Some of the signs were visible, the tattooed numbers on their arms, their physically deformed bodies, but all of them carried with them emotional damage not visible to others. Ghita Schwartz's novel, "Displaced Persons," is a powerful work centering on well-developed characters who are DPs who go about attempting to reconstruct and rebuild their destroyed existences.

This novel delves into the lives of those who "survived' by forming new families with other survivors, those who spent endless, mostly futile, years searching for the possibility of any remaining blood relatives and focuses on their years as DPs (there were no homes to go back to, no villages that welcomed them home, no yellow ribbons tied around old oak trees). The DP camps, overseen by the American and British forces, were way stations or holding pens until the DPs were able to find a country that would welcome them where they could resettle and begin to "live" again. Some DPs) went to Palestine where they had to learn to speak Hebrew and faced difficult transitions because they were not welcome by the Arabs (there was a British Mandate quota of 75,000 Jews permitted to immigrate) and found difficulty integrating with the Jews who had inhabited Palestine for hundreds if not thousands of years. Every country in the world, including the USA, had quotas and finding countries in which to resettle was daunting and took years for most of the DPs.

Most of the DPs awaited their new beginnings in Great Britain, Australia or America. The DPs in the novels are unable to speak about the atrocities they endured or how some of them managed to survive while so many others perished (we now have a term for this emotional scar: the "Guilt of the Survivor.")

We follow the shattered lives of Pavel, Fela and Chaim who form a new family unit after the liberation of the Nazi Concentration Camps and the tragic murders of their parents, aunts, uncles, siblings and other members of their extended families. Schwartz's writing is gripping, emotional, rational and beautiful.