» » Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch
Download Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch epub book
ISBN:0060853964
Author: Neil Gaiman
ISBN13: 978-0060853969
Title: Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch
Format: azw doc lrf rtf
ePUB size: 1352 kb
FB2 size: 1436 kb
DJVU size: 1821 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: William Morrow (February 28, 2006)
Pages: 400

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Neil Gaiman



Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (1990) is a World Fantasy Award-nominated novel, written as a collaboration between the English authors Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. The book is a comedy about the birth of the son of Satan, the coming of the End Times. There are attempts by the angel Aziraphale and the demon Crowley to sabotage the coming of the end times, having grown accustomed to their comfortable surroundings in England

Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. The authors would like to join the demon Crowley. in dedicating this book to the memory of. G. k. chesterton. And, in a way, it still isn’t. Good Omens was written by two people who at the time were not at all well known except by the people who already knew them. They weren’t even certain it would sell. They certainly didn’t know they were going to write the most repaired book in the world

BECAUSE I CAN. As predicted by the titular 17th century witch Agnes Nutter in her extremely nice accurate book of prophecies, handed down through centuries to her last living "professional descendant" Anathema Device, Armageddon is quickly approaching. The four Horsepersons of the Apocalypse have set out on their way, and that must mean things are getting serious.

Two great guys Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett are the authors of this awesome book. This book is the story of the apocalypse. A demon, named Crowley (an ex-angel who didn’t so much fall as saunter vaguely downwards), who actually really loves being on earth, is contacted to play his part in the birth of the Antichrist and to make sure he finds his appropriate home with a diplomat. Unfortunately, Crowley really loves there being an earth and humans to tempt and living his (eternal) life.

Электронная книга "Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch", Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

While Good Omens was first published in 1990, it has enjoyed continuous popularity and has been hailed numerous times as a cult classic. The Good Omens study guide contains a biography of authors Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. About Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch. Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch Summary. Read the Study Guide for Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witc. ssays for Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (1990) is a fantasy novel written in collaboration between Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. The book is a comedy and a quasi-parody of the 1976 film The Omen (as well as other books and films of the genre), concerning the birth of the son of Satan, the coming of the End Times and the attempts of the angel Aziraphale and the demon Crowley to avert them, having become accustomed to their comfortable situations in the human world.

So the armies of Good and Evil are amassing, Atlantis is rising, frogs are falling, tempers are flaring. Everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan. Except a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon-both of whom have lived amongst Earth's mortals since The Beginning and have grown rather fond of the lifestyle-are not actually looking forward to the coming Rapture. And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist.

Personal Name: Gaiman, Neil. Download Good omens : the nice and accurate prophecies of Agnes Nutter, witch : a novel Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Good omens : the nice and accurate prophecies of Agnes Nutter, witch : a novel, Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.

Good Omens" is a book about the end of the world, as seen by Agnes Nutter, witch. The story follows quite a few distinct story lines. If you are familiar with Mr. Neil Gaiman, you will recognize his unique style of storytelling, including the frequent footnotes you might have found in some of his other works. I was not as familiar with Mr. Pratchett's work, but now am interested in the discworld series which he is now known. Good Omens (the Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch) a book by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. Updated on August 23, 2018. Good Omens" is a book about the end of the world, as seen by Agnes Nutter, witch.

According to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (the world's only completely accurate book of prophecies, written in 1655, before she exploded), the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. Just before dinner.

So the armies of Good and Evil are amassing, Atlantis is rising, frogs are falling, tempers are flaring. Everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan. Except a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon—both of whom have lived amongst Earth's mortals since The Beginning and have grown rather fond of the lifestyle—are not actually looking forward to the coming Rapture.

And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist . . .

Reviews: 7
Xinetan
You may be a fan of Neil Gaiman's writing or maybe a TP fan. I happen to be both. Nothing pleases me more than listening to a witty, satirical and rollicking story about the end of the world, as foretold and foreseen by one Agnes Nutter, witch. I will probably listen to the story several more times and then donate the cd collection to my local library, for other people to enjoy.
Mavegelv
I can't understand all the great reviews for this novel!? I'm a huge Neil Gaiman fan, so I was expecting a lot when he teamed up with his well reputed friend, Pratchett. Prachett is very well known for his "Discworld" series, which I was planning on getting to eventually, but I'm not so certain now.

This book tries way too hard to be "wacky". There is no naturalness to the flow of the humor. Speaking of which, there is no naturalness to the pivotal character, "the anti-christ".

They write "Adam" and his three friends extremely poorly. They write them as how adults, who haven't seen a kid since they were one, think a wacky pack of seven year olds might act (they are eleven, but the authors put them at the maturity level of seven year olds).

I'll give the first "Discworld" novel a chance, but if starts off with the same tone as this book, I'll put it down very quickly.

BTW, some people are comparing the humor in this book to Douglas Adams??? I don't see where. It doesn't even resemble poorly done Douglas Adams work.
Lailace
Nature or nurture? That’s the question at the core of this funny take on the coming of the apocalypse, written by two masters of humorous speculative fiction—the late Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. The end of days is coming. What if the anti-Christ responsible for seeing it through had been switched at the hospital and was raised as a normal kid? Would he be evil enough? If not, how would the apocalypse play out? After a chapter that shows the reader the mix up at the hospital, the bulk of the book takes place over a few days that are supposed to be the last few days of humanity.

There’s an extensive cast of characters including the “gang” of Adam the anti-Christ, the four horse-persons of the apocalypse, angels and demons, witches and witch-hunters, and other sundry characters. However, the characters that most carry the tone and message of the book are Crowley (a demon) and Aziraphale (an angel.) With these two, the authors inject some Taoism into an otherwise Biblical world. That is to say, pure evil and pure good are rarities; there’s always a bit of good amid the bad, and vice versa. Aziraphale can be grumpy, and Crowley’s proclivity to be mischievous has its limits. Being in similar positions, the two bond as low level managers working for Coke and Pepsi might get on because they face similar demands and have similar complaints about management.

Running through the book are mentions of a book called, “The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch.” This witch’s prophecies are quite unusual in that they are invariably correct, and yet are specific. That is, the prophecies aren’t “right” in the sense that astrologers are often “right” by making vague statements that offer no disprovable propositions. This might lead one to believe that the book would be a marvelous guide for making predictions. However, there is still the issue of having been written centuries ago. Items like automobiles and cellphones, that play a major role in life today, were unfathomable. Furthermore, it’s usually not clear who, exactly, a given prophecy applies to. In short, the medieval writing style results in the fact that the prophecies usually only make sense after the fact.

I’d recommend this book for readers of humorous speculative fiction.
Skilkancar
After reading lots of post-apocalyptic stories, it's nice for me to read one about the apocalypse. Good Omens tells the story of the coming of the Anti-Christ. Everyone who is in the know assumes it will be just like the book of Revelation. In the know are two angels (one working for Heaven and the other for Hell) as well as the four horsemen of the Apocalypse (who kill time before meeting up with the Anti-Christ at Armageddon by causing trouble for people). The ineffable plan of God is about to come to fruition, time is on the verge of ending.

But the plan goes awry. Crowley (Hell's angel, who used to be called Crawley because he was the snake who tempted Adam and Eve out of Paradise) is supposed to swap the infant son of Satan for the son of an American diplomat, but there's a mix-up in the nursery that goes unnoticed. Aziraphale (Heaven's angel, who gave his flaming sword to Adam and Eve when they left Paradise because it was about to rain) has an agreement with Crowley. They have both been living on the earth long enough to have an affection for humans and all the neat stuff they have invented. Most importantly, they've started to latch on to free will, not only trying to get people to do good or evil on their own, but also starting to do a bit of work for each other when it's convenient and not too obviously contrary to their superiors' orders. Things are complicated for the angels.

The real Anti-Christ was raised as a normal child called Adam Young. He has some strange influence over other people but is basically a good boy most of the time. He has a group of friends in his small English town who play the usual games and are opposed by another group of local kids, a rival gang if you will.

Also in the mix is Anathema Device, a young women descended from Agnes Nutter, a seventeenth century witch noted for her accurate (though obscure) prophecies. Those prophecies involve the end times and her family members. The predictions are hard to interpret before the fact, however, so she runs around a bit trying to put two and two together before the world comes apart.

All this might sound like a serious drama, but in the hands of Pratchett and Gaiman, it's much more of a mad cap adventure. Crowley and Aziraphale are buddies trying to keep things going a little bit longer on earth. If the plan is really ineffable, who's to say the world isn't supposed to end now? The book has the dry, British sense of humor found in Douglas Adams's works or Monty Python. It is quite delightful and had me laughing out loud in several spots.

Highly recommended.

Also, I read this because Julie and Scott discussed it on A Good Story is Hard to Find podcast. Check out their fun comments!