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ISBN:0805039740
Author: Joanna Scott
ISBN13: 978-0805039740
Title: The Manikin: A Novel
Format: txt lit rtf doc
ePUB size: 1595 kb
FB2 size: 1664 kb
DJVU size: 1775 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Henry Holt & Co; 1st edition (February 1, 1996)
Pages: 276

The Manikin: A Novel by Joanna Scott



ru - The Manikin is not a mannequin, but the curious estate of Henry Craxton, Sr. in a rural western New York State. Dubbed the "Henry Ford of Natural History," by 1917 Craxton has become America's preeminent taxidermist

Joanna Scott wrote a book, finalist to the 1997 Pulitzer prize. The characters are deep, with emotions, described in a poetic way. The setting is a romantic one, and the description of the nature flows seamlessly as the story proceeds. The Manikin is her best yet and simply one of the best novels I've read in years and years, and I've read plenty.

The manikin : a novel. by Scott, Joanna, 1960-. Publication date 1996. Topics Taxidermy, Bildungsromans. Publisher New York : Henry Holt and Co. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. Contributor Internet Archive. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by loader-ElisaR on October 19, 2010.

Joanna Scott wrote a book, finalist to the 1997 Pulitzer prize. The thing I most disliked about "The Manikin" was the third-person omniscient narrative. While it is understandably necessary for the way the novel is constructed, it made the characters feel one-dimensional. I wanted to experience those things through them. There was also something about the writing style that detracted from the creepy/gothic element, like the difference between going to a haunted house and being told about someone else's trip to a haunted house. The Manikin" is just.

1996) A novel by Joanna Scott. Awards Pulitzer Prize for Fiction Best Book (nominee). The Manikin is not a mannequin, but the curious estate of Henry Craxton, Sr. Dubbed the & Ford of Natural History,& by 1917 Craxton has become America& preeminent taxidermist. Into this magic box of a world& with eerily inanimate gibbons and bats, owls and peacocks, quetzals and crocodiles& young Peg Griswood, daughter of Craxton& newest housekeeper

View More by This Author. This book can be downloaded and read in Apple Books on your Mac or iOS device. Dubbed the "Henry Ford of Natural History," by 1917 Craxton has become America's preeminent taxidermist. Into this magic box of a world-filled with eerily inanimate gibbons and bats, owls and peacocks, quetzals and crocodiles-wanders young Peg Griswood, daughter of Craxton's newest housekeeper.

Joanna Scott: The Manikin. In this novel, Joanna Scott starts to wade into Joyce Carol Oates territory, with a novel verging on the Gothic. Henry Craxton, when young, saw a pair of stuffed lions at the Paris exhibition and was so impressed that he decided that that was the business he wanted to go into. He set up a business that dealt with taxidermy and fossils as well as other scientific areas and made a lot of money out of it. He decided to move away from Rochester and built a large house out in the wilderness in upstate New York. This house was called the Manikin, a manikin being the frame. A girl's coming of age in the strange world of stuffed animals. Peg Griswood lives in the manor of a famous taxidermist, surrounded by staring, silent creatures, looked after by eccentric servants. Against this background, various human dramas are played out in what is basically a gothic novel of atmosphere. The setting is New York State early this century. By the author of Arrogance.

Download The Manikin - Joanna Scott. The Manikin - Joanna Scott. This file is of EPUB file format. This file is of EPUB file extension. You can also upload it to your Google Dive.

Joanna Scott (born 1960) is an American author and Roswell Smith Burrows Professor of English at the University of Rochester. Scott has received critical acclaim for her novels. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, she is the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, a Guggenheim fellowship, and the Lannan Literary Award for Fiction. She received an honorary doctor of letters degree from Trinity College (Connecticut) in 2009.

In The Manikin, Scott leaves behind the exquisitely rendered vision of Egon Schiele's turn-of-the-century Vienna that distinguished her much-praised novel Arrogance and turns with equally prismatic powers to the eerie rural confines outside of Rochester, New York, early in our own century. The "Manikin" is not a mannequin but a mansion, the estate of the late Henry Craxton Sr., the "Henry Ford of Natural History," founder of Craxton's Scientific Establishment, whose specialty, taxidermy, made him rich - as the world's largest supplier of fossils, dinosaur bones, and stuffed animals. The Manikin is full of the Founder's handicrafts - gibbons and bats, owls and peacocks, quetzals and crocodiles - and it is here that young Peg Griswood arrives with her mother, the new housekeeper, in 1917, and where she will spend her formative years amid the staring, silent creatures and among a staff of eccentric servants and groundskeepers.
Reviews: 3
Global Progression
Review can also be found in <a href="https://chillandreadblog.wordpress.com/2016/08/17/the-manikin-by-joanna-scott/">Chill and read</a>

The Manikin is the curious estate of Henry Craxton, Sr. in a rural western New York State. Mary Craxton leaves there, even though she never really wanted to, while her husband is dead and her remaining son, Henry Craxton Jr. is away from her, travelling the world. The family has got its money from taxidermy, since Craxton Institute is supplying the natural history museums with its showpieces. This is the story of the decline of that family, and the rise of its servants, especially the housekeeper Ellen and her daughter Peg.

The story begins with the northern owl travelling over the Craxton Lake. Later on, this owl is shot by the houseman's son, and becomes a showpiece itself. This happens a little before window Mary Craxton dies and her son returns to find that she's left everything to charity. The servants hate Henry Craxton who decides to take what is rightfully his by law. The have every right to do so, as he is a sin that never loved his mother and has the worst manners ever, especially when it comes to them.

Joanna Scott wrote a book, finalist to the 1997 Pulitzer prize. The characters are deep, with emotions, described in a poetic way. The setting is a romantic one, and the description of the nature flows seamlessly as the story proceeds. Love and passion are in the air, all inside the mansion and its surroundings. Words untold, remaining in the minds of the characters. Discussions that never took place between a mother and a daughter, a woman and a man. Heroes of the small things.
Windforge
Words fail me to convey the talent and charm of this writer and this book, but I'll give it a try. For my money and that of the Federal reserve, Joanna Scott is one of the brightest lights of contemporary American fiction. So bright you'll need sunglasses to read her stuff. Her fictional world distiles imagery, grace and language 99% of writers would kill for. The other 1% would sell their moms and aunts ( or at least lease them ) for it. The Manikin is her best yet and simply one of the best novels I've read in years and years, and I've read plenty. This a book for those who love to read, who relish the magic and the music in the language, who want to plunge into a wonderful world of mystery and narrative alchemy. The Manikin works as gothic mystery, as historical romance, as a meditation on lost innocence and life and as a soul tonic for those in need of great literature and greater fun... The prose itself is dynamite stuff that will elevate your life and brain tone faster than a pint of Ben&Jerry's. Don't deny yourself the extraordinary experience of reading this book or this author. Do it just for the fun and the pleasure of indulging in such a fascinating and engrossing read. As you read the last sentence, you'll rush to get Ms.Scott's other books because, by then, you'll be addicted to one of the premier storytellers of this generation. I am.
Dynen
This is a wonderful Victorian-style novel about a manor house, its mistress, and her domestics. Wonderful that is, until the middle of the story. The author makes choices that effectively shut down the flow and pacing of the story. It's spooky and interesting, but the sudden turn and the unexpected switch in the narrator's point of view, time, and setting make the rest of a great read a downer.