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ISBN:1607883740
Author: Dion Graham,Kevin T. Collins,Orlagh Cassidy,James Snyder,Scott Turow
ISBN13: 978-1607883746
Title: The Laws of Our Fathers
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ePUB size: 1188 kb
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Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing; Unabridged edition (June 1, 2010)

The Laws of Our Fathers by Dion Graham,Kevin T. Collins,Orlagh Cassidy,James Snyder,Scott Turow



Scott Turow is the author of ten bestselling works of fiction, including Identical, Innocent, Presumed Innocent, and The Burden of Proof, and two nonfiction books, including One L, about his experience as a law student. And the whole last 1/3 of the book is a character analysis after the plot has played out. I kept reading thinking there might be one final twist.

Author: Scott Turow Narrator: Dion Graham, Kevin T. Collins, Orlagh Cassidy, James Snyder Publisher: Hachette Book Group Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: 2. hours Series: The Kindle County Series Release Date: June 2010 ISBN: 9781607883753. With its riveting suspense and indelibly drawn characters, The Laws of Our Fathers shows once again why Scott Turow is not only the master of the modern legal thriller but also one of America’s most gifted and satisfying novelists. Turow reveals as no other writer can how the law and its mysterious rituals intersect with real life.

Narrated by Dion Graham. In Kindle County, a woman is killed in an apparent random drive-by shooting.

Written by : Scott Turow. Read By : Dion Graham, Orlagh Cassidy, Kevin T. Collins, James Snyder.

Narrated by James Snyder, Orlagh Cassidy, and Dion Graham. The woman turns out to be the ex-wife of a prominent state senator and an old acquaintance of Judge Sonia Klonsky, on whose desk the case lands. As the pursuit of justice takes bizarre and unusual turns, Judge Klonsky is brought face-to-face with a host of extraordinary personalities and formidable enemies bent on her destruction. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. More Audiobooks By Scott Turow. carousel previous carousel next. A War-Crime Mystery Drives Scott Turow's Newest Thriller.

Visit here to get free Scott Turow Audiobooks or see all over 178,453 titles from our library - AudiobookUK. narrator: Kevin Stillwell, Worthen Worthen. length: 17 hour 32 min. unabridged. narrator: Mark Bramhall. length: 16 hour 30 min. The Laws of Our Fathers. narrator: Orlagh Cassidy, Dion Graham. length: 24 hour 28 min. narrator: Robert Petkoff. length: 12 hour 38 min. Disclaimer.

Scott Turow was born in Chicago in 1949. He graduated with high honors from Amherst College in 1970, receiving a fellowship to Stanford University Creative Writing Center which he attended from 1970 to 1972. From 1972 to 1975 Turow taught creative writing at Stanford. Narrated by: Dion Graham, Kevin T. Collins, Orlagh Cassidy, and others. Length: 24 hrs and 28 mins. Collins, Orlagh Cassidy, Jay Snyder. Series: Kindle County, Book 4.

The Laws Of Our Fathers (Kindle County, by. Scott Turow (Goodreads Author), Dion Graham (Reader). James Snyder (Reader). Orlagh Cassidy (Reader).

Scott Turow, Dion Graham, Kevin T. Collins. The Laws of Our Fathers от 2232. One L: The Turbulent True Story of a First Year at Harvard Law School. Actor Paul Rudd deftly narrates this fascinating stor. т 1164. First Fall In Gainesville.

The Laws of our Fathers. A gripping portrayal of judicial corruption, The Laws of our Fathers is Scott Turow's fourth Kindle County legal thriller. It was another drive-by shooting in one of Kindle County's most drug-plagued housing projects – but the victim was the ex-wife of a politician. Now this explosive case is about to reunite an unlikely group of men and women who first bonded in the revolutionary fires of the 1960s. and show a once-crusading female judge, driven by both her fears and her courage, just how devastating a single wrong choice can b. .

In Kindle County, a woman is killed in an apparent random drive-by shooting. The woman turns out to be the ex-wife of a prominent state senator and an old acquaintance of Judge Sonia Klonsky, on whose desk the case lands. As the pursuit of justice takes bizarre and unusual turns, Judge Klonsky is brought face-to-face with a host of extraordinary personalities and formidable enemies bent on her destruction.
Reviews: 7
Alsantrius
Since I loved his earlier books, I was very disappointed by the excruciatingly slow pace of this one. Despite having grown up in the late 1960s myself, I found many if the flashbacks quite boring and not that credible. I felt like I was forcing myself to finish the book and eventually gave up because I didn't really care what happened to the characters. While the writing itself was good, and quite descriptive, I didn't feel much depth to the characters, it felt like reading a book about your neighbors by someone who didn't know them very well. I don't plan to read anything else in this series and feel the book would have been greatly improved by trimming, tightening and amping up the narrative arc.
Dianaghma
Is this an abnormal psychology text? The plot is so convoluted and difficult to follow that I found myself having to refer back to find out the timeframe or who us talking. I suppose it is an attempt to give context to the characters but for me it was laborious. Frankly, knowing why the players were so conflicted and tormented by their lives and felt so frustrated and angry doesn't add that much to the story. And the whole last 1/3 of the book is a character analysis after the plot has played out. I kept reading thinking there might be one final twist. But no. A general disappointment as a mystery but at times an interesting character study.
Brajind
Technically, Scott Turow is a very good writer. In this story he's done a fine job of describing what it's like for hippies to grow up -- at least for those who do grow up. Unfortunately, as seems to be the usual case, he's vastly overwritten his story, and in the end the whole thing comes apart, falling into pieces like a musical theme unresolved. It's too bad. The poor man badly needs a capable editor who can help him get under control his tendency to overwrite.
Coiril
After reading some of the reviews and the criticisms, I have to disagree with those that found the last 100 pages unnecessary or boring. Yes, it is a complex courtroom dramtic story with very complicated characters. Typical of Turow, each of the main characters are explored in depth as to their make up and what contributed to whom they have become. The flashbacks to the sixties were wonderful for me having lived through that time and, seeing who they became 25 years later was very realistic. But it was the psychological insight, honesty and development of these people in the last 60 or so pages that blew me away. I had to struggle to read some of the passages through my tears. At times, I felt like my heart was being ripped out by what he was saying. As always, he is a master in dealing with all these levels of story telling which puts him more than head and shoulders above the other legal thriller writers.
Taulkree
Turow is a great writer who can really develop characters, but if you are looking for a legal thriller, forget this one. It's really the life story of a female judge who is presiding over a trial with lengthy flashbacks to develop each of the characters, who happen to be from her past. The actual trial is interesting, but it's probably only about 15-20% of the book. I was thinking about giving this book only two stars, because I really didn't care about most of what was written about the characters, but that could just be me.
Usishele
I think that the book was longer than it needed to be. The story was interesting and i thoroughly enjoyed it but I found myself wondering how much longer it would take to tell it. He has a gift for dialog as is illustrated by the coversation's between the protagonist and his best friend and his coversations with his lover's daughter. His descriptions could be overly long and at times confusing enough that I had to reread some of them multiple times. I would reccommend this book because the issues it raises are important and thoughtfully presented.
Dakora
I normally enjoy Turow's books, including the Kindle County book. This is a large departure from his previous formats and one that I did not find to be enjoyable - in fact, it was actually difficult to read. I almost put it down after a couple of chapters. It improved, but the ending was as bad as the first couple of chapters.

Very disappointed.
The story moves at a very slow pace and drags out way too long. It is told partially through flashbacks and a lot of the dialogue could have been shortened to make the story move faster. There is also a lot of unnecessary foul language in this book which is also very distracting. Not one of Scott Turow's best efforts.