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ISBN:0312352476
Author: Cordelia Frances Biddle
ISBN13: 978-0312352479
Title: Deception's Daughter (Martha Beale)
Format: lit azw mobi mbr
ePUB size: 1343 kb
FB2 size: 1682 kb
DJVU size: 1545 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Minotaur Books; First Edition edition (August 19, 2008)
Pages: 288

Deception's Daughter (Martha Beale) by Cordelia Frances Biddle



Deception's Daughter book. Critics raved about The Conjurer, the first in Cordelia Frances Biddle’s superb historical mystery series. When the daughter of one of Philadelphia’s finest families disappears, Martha Beale becomes the unwilling liaison between the gi Critics raved about The Conjurer, the first in Cordelia Frances Biddle’s superb historical mystery series.

The Martha Beale Mysteries book. Publishers Weekly Deception’s Daughter: Now the guardian of two young children, Martha returns to Philadelphia to find it torn apart by the disappearance of a young heiress and a succession of unsolved robberies. Martha acts as liaison between the mayor’s aide and the missing girl’s parents, but the investigation takes a darker turn as rich and poor alike face a deadly threat.

Cordelia Frances Biddle creates pre-Civil War Philadelphia with all its sights, sounds, and smells. While many mansions remain from colonial days, there also crowded slums and poverty. The shouts of street vendors, wagons with iron clad wheels and horses plodding over cobblestone streets, the bellows and squeals of livestock going to slaughter provide a level of noise our modern ears would find uncomfortable.

An heiress breaks free of social conventions and attempts to solve the mystery of her father's disappearance in 1842 Philadelphia in Cordelia Frances Biddle's first Martha Beale mysteryWhen her father fails to appear for lunch at their country estate, Martha Beale knows something is wrong. The family's faithful dogs discover Lemuel Beale's hunting rifle by the river, but there is no sign of the millionaire financier. Refusing to believe he is dead, his daughter-and sole heir-begins a discreet investigation with the help of the mayor's aide, Thomas Kelman. Deception's Daughter (The Martha Beale Mysteries, 2). Cordelia Frances Biddle.

Cordelia Frances Biddle is the author of the Martha Beale Mystery series. A member of one of Philadelphia’s oldest families, she uses many of her actual ancestors as characters in her historical mysteries. She also cowrote the Nero Blanc Crossword Mystery series with her husband, Steve Zettler, with whom she lives in Philadelphia. Библиографические данные. Deception's Daughter The Martha Beale Mysteries (Том 2). Автор.

Written by Cordelia Frances Biddle, Audiobook narrated by Dara Rosenberg. Philadelphia heiress and amateur sleuth Martha Beale investigates the kidnapping of a society girl on the verge of marriage in Cordelia Frances Biddle's second Martha Beale mystery. Martha Beale, now the guardian of seven-year-old Ella and five-year-old Cai, has just returned to Philadelphia after summering in the country. The children have to begin school, and Martha looks forward to a reunion with Thomas Kelman, even though she isn't sure where their relationship stands. But a string of robberies is plaguing the city and the nineteen-year-old daughter of one of Philadelphia's.

Deception's Daughter. View More by This Author. This book can be downloaded and read in Apple Books on your Mac or iOS device. Philadelphia heiress and amateur sleuth Martha Beale investigates the kidnapping of a society girl on the verge of marriage in Cordelia Frances Biddle’s second Martha Beale mystery. The children have to begin school, and Martha looks forward to a reunion with Thomas Kelman, even though.

The Martha Beale Novels Have Been Released in E-book Format by Open Road. Intrigue, passion and murder surround the mysterious disappearance of Philadelphia financier, Lemuel Beale, in the winter of 1842. Purportedly a victim of accidental drowning, Beale’s legacy is a sinister web of political and financial machinations, and a troubling relationship with his daughter and only child. Deception’s Daughter. When the daughter of one of Philadelphia's finest families disappears, Martha Beale once more joins forces with her secret beau, Thomas Kelman, to track the heiress. But what appears to be a kidnapping takes a darker turn and complex clues implicate rich and poor alike - from the outlying Blockley House for the homeless, with its thin walls and hungry inhabitants, to the odor-laden bawdy house of Madam Kat, to the elegantly furnished drawing rooms (and bedrooms) of the wealthy. by Biddle, Cordelia Frances. Publication date 2008. Topics Young women, Upper class, Kidnapping. A Martha Beale mystery"-Jacket.

Critics raved about The Conjurer, the first in Cordelia Frances Biddle’s superb historical mystery series. Now Philadelphian heiress Martha Beale is back in a second thrilling installment laced with fast-paced intrigue and exquisite period detail.

When the daughter of one of Philadelphia’s finest families disappears, Martha Beale becomes the unwilling liaison between the girl’s aloof and aristocratic parents and Thomas Kelman, Martha’s secret beau, who is overseeing the investigation.

What appears to be a kidnapping, however, takes a darker turn, and complex clues implicate rich and poor alike. It is up to Martha and Kelman to unravel the diabolical plot--and the painful disparity of their social classes--as they struggle to unmask the killer.

As in The Conjurer, Cordelia Frances Biddle’s elegant and evocative prose brings to vibrant life mid-nineteenth-century Philadelphia. Deception’s Daughter is a stunning sequel from a multitalented crime writer.

Reviews: 6
SkroN
This is a bit too real for me, but the mystery saves it. Martha is a head strong woman who is out to help her friend, and police officer, Kelman to solve the kidnapping of a rich girl. Then, the murder after she is found. Martha and Kelman are forced to check out a brothel and a sanitarium. They are also made to deal with orphaned children, drunken criminals, and rich suitors trying to come between Martha and Kelman.
Dellevar
Like the other reviewers, I enjoyed the period detail. And I have an idea about who the suicide [if she actually died] was [Think about the various children in the book.]. But I don't see how the main crime could have happened without anyone hearing it, what lead up to it, &/or what happened next.
LivingCross
The second in Biddle's series packs an even stronger emotional punch than the first. With several plotlines and finely nuanced characterizations, she kept me guessing to the end, and her deft depiction of the romantic relationship between Martha and Thomas Kelman added to the tension. This novel has it all: young love, hideous secrets, fearlessness, daring and revenge. Biddle's a writer to watch.
Samardenob
The Martha Beale Mysteries are set in Philadelphia in 1842, and are serious rivals of historical mysteries written by British authors such as Anne Perry and Michael Jecks among others. Cordelia Frances Biddle creates pre-Civil War Philadelphia with all its sights, sounds, and smells. While many mansions remain from colonial days, there also crowded slums and poverty. The shouts of street vendors, wagons with iron clad wheels and horses plodding over cobblestone streets, the bellows and squeals of livestock going to slaughter provide a level of noise our modern ears would find uncomfortable. The smells of unwashed humanity, animal waste, and the sharp order from tanneries and slaughter houses bring tears to the eyes and leave a taste in one's mouth.

Side by side with the squalor are the luxurious homes of the wealthy. In one such home lives Martha Beale, wealthy heiress, who at twenty-six can be very nearly classified as a spinster. Most women of her age and station are already wives and mothers, but if Philadelphia society thinks badly of Martha's marital status, everyone is careful to remain quiet. Martha is, after all, very, very rich and with no father and no husband, is in total control of her fortune, She does find herself involved in murder rather more often than one expects of a lady in her social position. Actually, ladies of her class never find themselves in that position.

In fact, Martha Beale has behaved in other unconventional ways about which Philadelphia society must bite it's collective tongue to avoid vocally criticizing her. Martha has adopted Ella, an eleven-year-old child prostitute, although society is unaware of Ella's former status, and Cai, a young mixed blood Negro child. If adopting socially inferior children and her involvement in murder isn't enough to raise eyebrows. there is always Martha's association with Thomas Kelman, a criminal investigator with the Mayor's office, to provide grist for the rumor mill. Philadelphia society would be horrified if it knew that Martha and Thomas hold strong if unexpressed romantic feelings for one another. If they should, God forbid, marry, then even all of Martha's wealth might not prevent her ostracism from society.

In this second book of the series, Martha witnesses the abandonment of an infant and the suicide of its mother. The infant is saved by the actions of a group of boys from an orphanage led by twelve-year-old Findal Stokes. But who is the unfortunate mother and who fathered the child? How do the night time thefts committed with help of children fit into the picture, or do they? Then there is the question of young Theodora Crowther, daughter of a very wealthy Main Line family. Has she been kidnapped or has she eloped with her fiance? Are Martha and Thomas looking at one crime or two?

Ms. Biddle draws on historical facts and uses members of her own family as minor characters to re-create 1842 Philadelphia, and provides the reader with a first rate mystery. Anyone who loves historical mysteries will love this series.
Quttaro
First of all, I have to admit I stumbled across the second book of this series first and I have yet to read the first book.

And it is certainly readable and enjoyable when read out of order. Everything you need to know about the characters is mentioned when they are (re)introduced without getting hammered with the knowledge all at once, not an easy thing to do in a multiple book series.

The writing itself takes a bit of getting used to (since it is written in the third person present tense probably to enable the reader to get "inside the head" of different major characters.) But, it is well worth the effort since the author has a gift for evoking the period, and an eye for detail especially with the class diferences and the workings of the Philadelphia.

My major criticism with the book is that, although the major mystery (the disappearance of a young upper-class woman) is resolved, the book itself feels like there is no conclusion. Too many unrelated plotlines are mentioned and then dropped (presumably to be picked up in the next book.)

People are introduced, deeds hinted at, and then never really developed. They seem like they should be important, but they peter off into nothing and we're left with wondering why they were mentioned at all.

For instance, Martha (whom the series is named after, although she doesn't actually do much sleuthing herself) sees a young woman commit suicide early in the book (although she doesn't know later that's what the young woman has done.) The suicide mentioned numerous times, as is the fact that other people know who she is (though the authorities and the reader never find out.) The suicide is blond, like the missing girl. Do the keepers of the "poor house" (Blockley House) know who she is? Is it related to the missing girl? Or is the sole reason for the suicide's existence the introduction of the boy who reported her? In which case, why keep returning to her again and again without having something new to say about her?

Maybe if I had waited for book 3 to have been released, I would understand these seemingly extraneous elements and find them more acceptable. Perhaps, the first book is filled with similar dangling threads, I'll have to see.

So, while I enjoyed this book, I would recommend waiting to read it until the next one is available unless you don't mind that not everything in the book is related or resolved.