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Download Gettysburg: A Novel of the Civil War epub book
ISBN:031230935X
Author: William Forstchen,Newt Gingrich
ISBN13: 978-0312309350
Title: Gettysburg: A Novel of the Civil War
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ePUB size: 1419 kb
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Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books; 1st edition (June 12, 2003)
Pages: 463

Gettysburg: A Novel of the Civil War by William Forstchen,Newt Gingrich



The 1863 Battle of Gettysburg, the universally acknowledged turning point in the Civil War, by which the forces of Robert E. Lee were turned back from their invasion of Northern territory and from which the Confederacy was never to recover, is endlessly studied, most recently in the definitive, compelling Gettysburg by Stephen Sears  . Anyone wishing to delve deep into the study of the battles at Gettysburg would do well to read Sears excellent book.

The novel Gettysburg puts forth an highly plausible and exciting scenario of a Confederate victory in the Pennsylvania campaign of 1863. The authors exhibit an in depth knowledge of not only technical details, but also the various personalities of the leaders how they could have reacted had things gone quite differently from history as we know it. ―Don Troiani, noted Civil War artist. After my annual viewing of the film Gettysburg I was hungry for more detail and chose Stephen Sears book. There are many more complexities and nuances to the evolution of the Battle then you get in high school history. Sears describes the genesis of the campaign, the logic and reasoning behind it, and switches between both camps as they blunder towards each other to give you a sense of suspense.

The Civil War is the American Iliad. Lincoln, Stonewall Jackson, Grant, and Lee still stand as heroic ideals, as stirring to our national memory as were the legendary Achilles and Hector to the world of the ancient Greeks. Within the story of our Iliad one battle stands forth above all others: Gettysburg. In the great tradition of The Killer Angels and Jeff Shaara's bestselling Civil War trilogy, this is a novel of true heroism and glory in America's most trying hour. Genres: Fiction & Literature . Millions visit Gettysburg each year to walk the fields and hills where Joshua Chamberlain made his legendary stand and Pickett went down to a defeat which doomed a nation, but in defeat forever became a symbol of the heroic Lost Cause. This is a novel of true heroism and glory in America's most trying hour.

Gettysburg: A Novel of the Civil War is an alternate history novel written by Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen. It was published in 2003 and became a New York Times bestseller. It is the first part in a trilogy in which the next books are respectively Grant Comes East and Never Call Retreat. The story takes place in 1863 when Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia are victorious at the Battle of Gettysburg instead of the United States.

Grant Comes East, the second book in the bestselling series by Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen, continues the story of a Confederate victory at Gettysburg. The first book examined the great "what if" of American history: Could Lee have won the Battle of Gettysburg? A Confederate victory, however, would not necessarily mean that the Southern cause has gained its final triumph and a lasting peace. Across 140 years, nearly all historians have agreed that after the defeat of the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg, the taking of Washington, DC, would end the war. But was it possible? Lee knows that a frontal assault against such fortifications could devastate his army, but it is a price he fears must be paid for final victory.

Personal Name: Gingrich, Newt. Publication, Distribution, et. Waterville, Me. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The battle of the crater : a novel of the Civil War, by Newt Gingrich, William R.

by Gingrich, Newt; Forstchen, William R; Hanser, Albert S. Publication date 2003. Topics Gettysburg, Battle of, Gettysburg, P. 1863. Publisher New York : St. Martin's Press. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. Contributor Internet Archive. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on September 27, 2011.

Newt Gingrich; William Forstchen. A besieged Lincoln calls on a general with a drinking problem to save the Union

Months before publication, William R. Forstchen's novel One Second After was cited on the floor of Congress as a book all Americans should read. This third book in the series immerses readers once more in the story of our nation's struggle to rebuild itself after an electromagnetic pulse wipes out all electricity and plunges the country into darkness, starvation, and death.

The Civil War is the American Iliad. Lincoln, Stonewall Jackson, Grant, and Lee still stand as heroic ideals, as stirring to our national memory as were the legendary Achilles and Hector to the world of the ancient Greeks. Within the story of our Iliad one battle stands forth above all others: Gettysburg. Millions visit Gettysburg each year to walk the fields and hills where Joshua Chamberlain made his legendary stand and Pickett went down to a defeat which doomed a nation, but in defeat forever became a symbol of the heroic Lost Cause. As the years passed, and the scars healed, the debate, rather than drifting away has intensified. It is the battle which has become the great "what if," of American history and the center of a dreamscape where Confederate banners finally do crown the heights above the town.  The year is 1863, and General Robert E. Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia are poised to attack the North and claim the victory that would end the brutal conflict. But Lee's Gettysburg campaign ended in failure, ultimately deciding the outcome of the war.  Launching his men into a vast sweeping operation, of which the town of Gettysburg is but one small part of the plan, General Lee, acting as he did at Chancellorsville, Second Manassas, and Antietam, displays the audacity of old. He knows he has but one more good chance to gain ultimate victory, for after two years of war the relentless power of an industrialized north is wearing the South down. Lee's lieutenants and the men in the ranks, embued with this renewed spirit of the offensive embark on the Gettysburg Campaign that many dream "should have been." The soldiers in the line, Yank and Reb, knew as well that this would be the great challenge, the decisive moment that would decided whether a nation would die, or be created, and both sides were ready, willing to lay down their lives for their Cause. An action-packed and painstakingly researched masterwork by Newt Gingrich and William Forstchen, Gettysburg stands as the first book in a series to tell the story of how history could have unfolded, how a victory for Lee would have changed the destiny of the nation forever. In the great tradition of The Killer Angels and Jeff Shaara's bestselling Civil War trilogy, this is a novel of true heroism and glory in America's most trying hour.
Reviews: 7
Runeshaper
I read Stephen Sears "Gettysburg" after reading Noah Trudeau's "Gettysburg - A Testing of Courage"; I wanted to see how the authors agreed and differed on this turning point of the Civil War. Sears met my expectations of learning even more about this battle and provided me with even more curiosity about what happened in this small town in the summer of 1863. I enjoyed the pictures and drawings, missing in Trudeau's work, that provided more context to the story although I felt the maps in Trudeau's book were more informative. Anyone wishing to delve deep into the study of the battles at Gettysburg would do well to read Sears excellent book.
Tam
I first read Gettysburg several years ago and loved it. Knowing the battlefield and town were still there made me want to visit. In April of 2017 I spent a couple of days there. Standing on Little Round Top, climbing around the Slaughter Pen, looking across from Seminary Ridge and walking around Cemetery Hill and standing near the spot where Lincoln gave the Gettysburg address make me read it again. So much better the second time through. I paid closer attention to how war was fought during the Civil War, how the people of Gettysburg and surrounding towns dealt with two great armies that needed food, clothing, medical treatment and, ultimately burying. I want to go back again to Gettysburg... Read this book.
JoldGold
After my annual viewing of the film Gettysburg I was hungry for more detail and chose Stephen Sears book. There are many more complexities and nuances to the evolution of the Battle then you get in high school history. Sears describes the genesis of the campaign, the logic and reasoning behind it, and switches between both camps as they blunder towards each other to give you a sense of suspense. There were heroes and villains, laggards and fools, inspired moves and colossal failures. It is fascinating to watch how the fortunes of both sides sway one way or the other during the conflict. Sears places most of the blame for the catastrophe on Robert E. Lee, who handled his forces poorly and seemed not to recognize some of the weaknesses of his command decisions. A good read.
GAZANIK
First one must realize if you are just wishing to have a short book that will give one and overall summary of what happened at the battle of Gettysburg, then this book is not for you. After many years our family was finally able to visit the battlefield and most likely this would be our only trip. So after a great deal of research I purchased this book. I am so glad I did. The detail was almost overwhelming and there were times I had to really focus to keep all the events in place. I did refer to the maps that were in the book often and sometimes the most current map to the subject matter did not have all the locations the author talked about. However, this should not be taken as a negative comment because the book would have been nothing but maps. If you are planning on going to the battlefield then this book makes everything one sees fascinating as the author did a masterful job with the detail of each location. I really liked how the book flowed as well, the timeline was easy to keep up with. Again, if you are just looking to be entertained, this book may not be for you. However, if you really want to know every detail including troop movements then I can't imagine a better book available.
roternow
In Gettysburg, Stephen W. Sears charts the Gettysburg Campaign, June 3 to July 24, 1863, Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s second invasion of the North during the American Civil War. The campaign culminated in the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, in which approximately 48,000 Americans became casualties. In the end, nothing was gained except these men added to the casualties rolls.

No two armies could have been more similar and yet more different than the Army of the Potomac and Army of Northern Virginia. For the first time, the two armies neared manpower parity. While Lee’s army was supremely confident, even contemptuous of its opponents, George G. Meade’s army had no illusions about the coming fight. Its men were eager to prove they could win a victory.

Where Lee’s command was rife with disagreement, miscommunication, apathy, and poor decision making, with some exceptions the leadership of the Army of the Potomac had its finest hour. Sears convincingly demonstrates that the Union army’s leadership simply out classed their counterparts, at least on this battlefield.

Much has been made over the years of Confederate cavalry commander Maj. General J.E.B. Stuart’s absence during the critical days leading up to the battle. Sears in some ways exonerates Stuart. Stuart was following Lee’s orders when he rode around the Union army, capturing supplies and disrupting communications.

“The very concept of Stuart’s expedition was fueled by overconfidence and misjudgment at the highest command level,” he argued. While frustrated with Stuart’s absence, Lee made no effort to rectify the situation until after the battle was underway.

The Army of Northern Virginia lost many of its finest men and officers at the Battle of Gettysburg. It would never recover. Faced with opposition from his generals for the first time, particularly Lt. General James Longstreet, Lee dug in his heels and stubbornly refused to budge. This inability to properly manage his subordinates was at the heart of the campaign’s failure. Where Lee failed at managing his subordinates, Meade succeeded. Sears concludes, Meade “thoroughly out generaled Robert E. Lee at Gettysburg.”

In some ways, Sears judges the Army of Northern Virginia too harshly. Despite some missteps, the first day was a stunning victory for the Confederates, and the second day was at worst a draw. The Union army occupied a strong defensive position on high ground. It is questionable whether any Confederate army could have dislodged it. Still, Pickett’s Charge on July 3 was an inexcusable disaster that everyone except George Pickett and Robert E. Lee seemed to know would fail.

Perhaps no Civil War battle has been written about more than Gettysburg, but Sears still manages to break new ground. There are no factual bombshells here–it is a familiar story, but the author’s analysis is as insightful as his writing style is clear, concise, and at times even poetic. This is truly a masterwork.