» » The Wrong Thing (Switchblade)
Download The Wrong Thing (Switchblade) epub book
ISBN:1604864516
Author: Barry Graham
ISBN13: 978-1604864519
Title: The Wrong Thing (Switchblade)
Format: mbr rtf txt mobi
ePUB size: 1226 kb
FB2 size: 1152 kb
DJVU size: 1225 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: PM Press (August 1, 2011)
Pages: 172

The Wrong Thing (Switchblade) by Barry Graham



Barry Graham’s THE WRONG THING isn’t about a madman with a thirst for bloodletting, more so a young man who takes to violence as a means to an end. Knowing little by way of problem solving skills, any hurdles in his way succumb to brutality as bikies, police, and innocents feel the wrath of the urban badlands walking myth. I first read Barry Graham in 1997 when I found a copy of Before at The Strand in NYC. Like most books you find by a new author it was the cover that caught my eye, the back cover text that sold me. It was a great find, I devoured it, loved it, but then I never found anything by Graham again.

The Wrong Thing" was a serious genre stretch for me-I don't read a lot of crime fiction, and only picked this up because of my PM Press membership. I read the novel, or more properly novella, on a lazy Saturday morning, and for that purpose it was enjoyable. The book follows the brief life of The Kid, a young man of Latino heritage who falls into a lifestyle of crime.

Barry Graham is a Zen monk and an award-winning, internationally acclaimed author and journalist. He has written for a wide variety of magazines and newspapers, including Harper's, and his works include Before, The Book of Man, and Get Out as Early as You Can. He lives in Phoenix, Arizona. Библиографические данные. The Wrong Thing Switchblade Series.

The Kid liked doing that too, going into his parents’ house and sitting in their living room reading a history book. His father would have come home from his warehouse job and would be watching TV or talking with Celeste. His mother would be in the kitchen, making dinner.

They call him the Kid. He's a killer, a dark legend of the Southwest's urban badlands, "a child who terrifies adults. They speak of him in whispers in dive bars near closing time. Some claim to have met him. Others say he doesn't exist, a phantom blamed for every unsolved act of violence, a ghost who haunts every blood-splattered crime scene.

The Wrong Thing - Barry Graham. This is what they are saying about him: The Kid? Yes, I knew him, and I know his mother and father too. The Kid sold drugs and killed people. So all their relatives started calling him the same thing. As he grew up, it was how he thought of himself, whenever he did. He had a younger sister, but she was called Celeste and he was still the Kid. Celeste never seemed to have a problem with anything. The Kid just couldn’t seem to get anything right; he always had to know why things were as they were. His parents were second-generation Mexican-American, and they didn’t speak Spanish, though they had the accent. They spoke the slang of the barrio they lived in.

A dark Latino legend of the Southwest's urban badlands, the kid is spoken of in whispers in dive bars near closing time. Some claim to have met him, and others say he doesn't exist-a phantom blamed for every unsolved act of violence, a ghost who haunts every blood-splattered crime scene. In reality, he is young man with a love of cooking and reading, an abiding loneliness, and an appetite for violence.

This is the first book by Barry Graham I've read. He's definitely going on my list of future eBooks. The first thing that came up to my mind when I finished WHEN IT ALL COMES DOWN TO DUST is that I'm glad that people like Barry Graham exist. People who keep things in perspective and who understand that life is complex and flowing thing, like a river. Even better, he wrote a book of fiction about it to make his point.

They call him The Kid. He's a killer, a dark legend of the Southwest's urban badlands, "a child who terrifies adults." They speak of him in whispers in dive bars near closing time.Some claim to have met him. Others say he doesn't exist, a phantom blamed for every unsolved act of violence, a ghost who haunts every blood-splattered crime scene. But he is real. He's a young man with a love of cooking and reading, an abiding loneliness and an appetite for violence. He is a cipher, a projection of the dreams and nightmares of people ignored by the economic boom...and a modern-day outlaw in search of an ordinary life. Love brings him the chance at a new life in the form of Vanjii, a beautiful, damaged woman. But try as he might to abandon the past, his past won't abandon him. The Kid fights back in the only way he knows--and sets in motion a tragic sequence of events that lead him to an explosive conclusion shocking in its brutality and tenderness. 
Reviews: 6
Araath
A violent balance of the renegade and romantic, THE WRONG THING merges two distinct traits and creates a central character that's as deadly as he is endearing. For The Kid, a young man born more of myth than blood, bone and flesh, life hasn't been easy. Undersized and undervalued, his home life brought nothing but pain and seclusion with crime a natural progression as part of his development. Subsequent incarceration ensures the family ties remain severed, while any foothold in the drug business is lost upon release back into the community. Here's where the story gains momentum and things get a whole lot bloodier.

Barry Graham's THE WRONG THING isn't about a madman with a thirst for bloodletting, more so a young man who takes to violence as a means to an end. Knowing little by way of problem solving skills, any hurdles in his way succumb to brutality as bikies, police, and innocents feel the wrath of the urban badlands walking myth.

The Kid is much deeper than I had anticipated - he's surprising well rounded, emotionally sound (if a killer can be) and in empathic towards the opposite sex, particularly when they're in need of a saviour. He cooks, he loves, he kills. This simple yet highly effective premise serves Graham's creation well. The basic need to love and care is balanced out by an easy violence that's all too natural. I really enjoyed this black/white double sided take on what is a very interesting character.

I love noir that portrays a character in many forms and THE WRONG THING does that to perfection. The plot accompanies the character, the drive and progression of the story proceeds at the pace of the characters doing - everything else is peripheral. There is a hopelessness quality to THE WRONG THING that echoes long after the confronting ending concludes that resonates well for fans of the genre. Like the other titles I've read by Barry Graham, THE WRONG THING does not disappoint.
Perdana
The Wrong Thing is a bit difficult to classify. In the end it is a biography but it takes the reader through places that most biographies never enter.

The Kid, that is all we know him as, is introduced by a narrator who disappears only to turn up near the end of the book as recipient of possibly the Kid's last act of kindness. In between we learn about The Kid's childhood (neglected), adolescence(delinquent) and adulthood(short and violent).

This novel moves as quickly and intensely as The Kid lives, all the while developing him as a character we are alternately attracted to and repelled from. He is a student of history and desires to be a chef, yet his knife is used on those who wrong him as often as in his kitchen. He is capable of adopting and loving a stray kitten or shooting down a man in the middle of the street.

The Kid leads a charmed life. His enemies can't find him and the police raid his house and don't find drugs in plain sight. But his life is constantly one of abandonment and estrangement, from his girl friends, from his family, from his friends. His violent acts are always against those who have wronged him. That they far surpass what we consider a reasonable response shows the intensity of his character. He finally sets his end game in motion when his victims are innocent.

Perhaps Barry Graham created The Kid as an archetype for the sort of soulless, brutal and random killers that our society produces. Certainly the Kid suffers from the equally soulless society that people of his social class and background must endure today. But The Kid isn't an ideological stalking horse for society's ills; he is a real person with a life that we watch descending to its inevitable conclusion. As with all biographies, this one begins with a birth and ends with a death. But the journey between the two is what sets The Wrong Thing apart from anything else I've read.
porosh
Barry Graham is a poet of the rough side of life, and The Wrong Thing is one of his most powerful novels. His main character is The Kid, an iconic figure in the barrio of Santa Fe, New Mexico. Small, but tough, the Kid struggles to make a place for himself in the world. Yes, he deals drugs, gets locked up and kills people, but he has a curious, searching intellect that tries to make sense of his surroundings and his trajectory in life. He learns to be an adept cook, tries his hand at art, and loves to read, two of his favorite books being Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States and James Beard's American Cookery. He gets a job as a receptionist at a car dealership, but gets upset because his boss takes cookies from his desk without asking, and winds up being fired. He stabs a man to death because the man puts a clamp on his car for parking in a restricted area, then shoots two more people to death in a robbery of a 7-11 store. On the run from Santa Fe to Phoenix, he looks up a recent girl friend, discovers she's afraid of him now, and allows himself to be shot to death by police who come to arrest him. The Kid's tale is a depressing look at life lived at the bottom, but it's a vivid picture because of the energy Graham brings to the description. A sense of the story's raw violence lingers long after the last page is turned.
Modred
Barry Graham does an excellent job of portraying a side of life most of us are not acquainted with. His main character, named simply "The Kid", does his best to cope with a life colored by indifferent parents, who in the end kick him out of the house and sever ties with him forever.

He bravely fights the demons inside him (which include a propensity to kill) but like a lot of us, they get the best of him. This book is very real because it intimately depicts many tender moments in The Kid's life; Graham does not turn the kid into a caricature of evil, where no goodness exists. Nobody is 100% evil all the time except, possibly, Dick Cheney.

The book is well written, grabs your interest, and goes out with a bang worthy of being filmed (in slow motion, naturelment) by Francis Ford Coppola himself. I'm still trying to come up with the best music for the final scene. I will forward it to Messr. Coppola when I think of it.