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ISBN:189077166X
Author: Jaime De Angulo,Darryl Babe Wilson
ISBN13: 978-1890771669
Title: Indian Tales (California Legacy)
Format: mbr lrf txt lit
ePUB size: 1827 kb
FB2 size: 1112 kb
DJVU size: 1258 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Heyday Books; Reprint edition (July 1, 2003)
Pages: 256

Indian Tales (California Legacy) by Jaime De Angulo,Darryl Babe Wilson



Native American Studies. De Angulo may have learned how to tell a story from the northern California Indian storytellers he worked with for many years; their humanity, humor and wisdom shine through the book.

Indian Tales is a collection of connected short narratives written and illustrated by Jaime de Angulo, published by A. A. Wyn in 1953. The stories revolve around an anthropomorphic animal family traveling across California, and encountering various mythological figures, such as Old Man Coyote, Loon Woman, and various animal tribes who live as the indigenous peoples of California did in pre-European times

Indian Tales (California Legacy). Indians of North America, California, Fairy Tales, Folklore & Mythology, Fiction - General, Folklore, Folklore & Mythology, Folklore, Indian, General, Historical - General, Internet Archive Wishlist, Legends, Literature - Classics, Criticism, Social Science, Sociology, Tales.

California Legacy Series. Indian Tales; Introduction by Darryl Babe Wilson. Fool's Paradise: A Carey McWilliams Reader, Introduction by Gray Brechin; Preface by Wilson Carey McWilliams. Unfinished Message: Selected Works of Toshio Mori, Introduction by Lawson Fusao Inada.

Description: Tales of the Pit River Indians as recounted by anthropologist Jaime de Angulo for KPFA in 1949. Rights are owned by Pacifica Radio Archives. In addition, the reproduction of some materials may be restricted by terms of gift or purchase agreements, donor restrictions, privacy and publicity rights, licensing and trademarks

Author: Jaime de Angulo. Illustrator: Jaime de Angulo. Genre: folktales, children's literature. Indian Tales is a collection of connected short narratives written and illustrated by Max Benier, published by A. The stories revolve around an anthropomorphic animal family traveling across California, and encountering various mythological figures, such as Old Man Coyote, Loon Woman, and various animal tribes who live as the indigenous peoples of California did in pre-European times. The book is an imaginative retelling of many of the folktales and myths collected by de Angulo as an erstwhile anthropologist. The stories are written to be of interest to younger readers, but. Indian Tales, Jaime de Angulo. Hill & Wang, 1953.

by Jaime De Angulo Book Views: 5. Author. Find & Download Book - Indian Tales (A California legacy book). Tales of the Fish Patrol; Introduction by Jerry George.

Other authors: See the other authors section. Arthur Ransome, Carl Sandburg. Hailed by Ezra Pound as the "American Ovid" and renowned as a linguist and a self-described "amateur anthropologist," Jaime de Angulo drew on his forty years among the Pit River tribe of California to create the amalgam of fiction, folklore, tall tales, jokes, ceremonial ritual, and adventure that is Indian Tales.

Hailed by Ezra Pound as the "American Ovid" and renowned as a linguist and a self-described "amateur anthropologist," Jaime de Angulo drew on his forty years among the Pit River tribe of California to create the amalgam of fiction, folklore, tall tales, jokes, ceremonial ritual, and adventure that is Indian Tales. He first wrote these stories to entertain his children, borrowing freely from the worlds of the Pit, and also of the Miwok, Pomo, and Karok. Here are the adventures of Father Bear, Mother Antelope, the little boy Fox, and, of course, Old Man Coyote in a time when people and animals weren't so very far apart. The author's intent was not so much to rer anthropologically faithful translations-though they are here-as to create a magical world fueled by the power of storytelling while avoiding the dangers for the romantic and picturesque. True to the playful and imaginative spirit he portrays, de Angulo mischievously recommends to readers: "When you find yourself searching for some mechanical explanation, if you don't know the answer, invent one. When you pick out some inconsistency or marvelous improbability, satisfy your curiosity like the old Indian folk: 'Well, that's the way they tell that story. I didn't make it up!'"
Reviews: 7
Doomwarden
While at first it might appear to some that this is strictly a book for kids it is ageless in its appeal. Though very much related to the fairy tales of Western cultures this has an earthiness, a down-to-earthness that those fairy tales often lack. It takes place in a mythic time when it is possible for a nuclear family to consist of a bear (father), antelope (mother), fox (son), and oriole (daughter) and for the members of that family to also be people. In Jaime de Angulo's sure and magical hands this family not only feels plausible, but just like it should be, just like nature. This book makes it possible for us to enter in a small way what the world view of California Indians must have been before the European invasion.
asAS
Enchanting tales retold from American Native legends. Suitable for all ages (I first read them when I was 8, and I keep re-reading them 40 years later - I still find new angles).
Fek
This book rates as one of my favorite five of all time...If you are a northern Californian (a REAL Californian) this book can attach you to your landscape in the most delightful ways. It is actually a re-telling, a new story which incorporates many many California native tales into a simple story of a family from California DreamTime that take a walking journey from their inland home to the coast. It was both of my kids' favorite read-aloud bedtime book, and the droll illustrations by the author (a physician who helped start UCSF med center, and a buddy of the Kroebers etc.) are equally sublime.
Pameala
Perfect for second grade as a reader...7-9 age range. you can never tell if the boy is an animal or human...the mystery of the spirit animal and developing a personality that separates a child from their parents...very rich in the Californian First Nation tradition. Themes of moral impulse through natural consequence and self awareness rather than social conformation. Also, seeing the other and finding your place in a community. A rare piece of high quality literature for children.
Quamar
I bought this book for my second grade class for story time after it was recommended at a training I attended. This book is so incredibly boring I could barely get through it as an adult. I never could expect a class of 8 year olds to enjoy it. I don't feel it is very racially sensitive for this day and age. I would not recommend this book.
Chillhunter
I thought this was only a mediocre collection of tales, not especially well told, and that it properly belongs in the Children's books category
Mr_KiLLaURa
Jaime de Angulo was a truly Californian character -- wanderer, poet, wastrel, anthropologist, linguist, and wild man; and near the end of his life he started retelling to his children the stories he'd learned from years of field work (and just hanging around) with the Pit River Indians of northern California. Out of those stories came this enchanting book, a semi-novel for children and wise adults, a series of stories both hilarious and profound told and experienced during a family's journey to visit relatives by the ocean. De Angulo's luminous vision gives us as intimate a picture of a Native American vision of life as any book I can think of. That this classic is not better known is a mystery....
I was assigned to read this book for a Native American Literature class. I was somewhat hesitant going into it because I had never read any sort of Native American literature, and I was only vaguely familiar with the culture. I read the book in its entirety within the span of a week, and I enjoyed it for the most part. Diving into the world of Native American culture through de Angulo's lens really helps in introducing and compelling his audience, including me, and immersing them in the culture.

Jaime de Angulo tells a series of tales within the story of a family's journey. He weaves in actual Native American tales that discuss creation, gender roles, and the human experience. He also does really well in conveying the importance and the essence of nature within Native American culture, and portrays famous Native American heroes and heroines in a fun and intriguing manner. The only (possible) setback is that de Angulo's writing can come off as a bit juvenile or hyper-simple. Perhaps the reason for this is because de Angulo originally wrote the book for his children, not knowing that it would become the novel that it is today. If you're not used to this type of writing style, it can be jarring at first.

I would highly suggest this book for a light read. The simplicity of it does make it easier to get through as opposed to denser writing styles. It's also great to familiarize yourself with Native American lore, tradition, and culture!