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ISBN:0060898658
Author: Jess Walter
ISBN13: 978-0060898656
Title: The Zero: A Novel
Format: lit mbr txt lrf
ePUB size: 1510 kb
FB2 size: 1609 kb
DJVU size: 1480 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Harper (August 29, 2006)
Pages: 336

The Zero: A Novel by Jess Walter



Part Three: The Zero. Other Books by Jess Walter. The man refused to look up from his book. Peering over, Remy saw he was hiding a ratty paperback behind the hardcover. At first Remy thought it was a blank book, but then he saw that he was merely at the end of a chapter and there were only a few words on the page: nothing more hopeless, than this freedom, this waiting, this inviolabilit. .Remy waited but the man didn’t look up, didn’t even turn the page, just sat reading over and over: nothing more hopeles. his waiting.

Personal Name: Walter, Jess, 1965-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The Zero : a novel, Jess Walter.

Interestingly, Jess Walter published The Zero in 2006, the same year as Saturday, but I was living in New Zealand at the time, where no one had heard of Walter. The novel never made my radar. My book club in Christchurch read Saturday; had we known about Walter's, I know we would have read and loved it; it was that kind of a book club. I had a raging bout of insomnia last night, so I'm kind of rambling.

Jess Walter is the author of six novels, including the bestsellers Beautiful Ruins and The Financial Lives of the Poets, the National Book Award finalist The Zero, and Citizen Vince, the winner of the Edgar Award for best novel. His short fiction has appeared in Harper's, McSweeney's, and Playboy, as well as The Best American Short Stories and The Best American Nonrequired Reading.

Hero cop Brian Remy wakes up after shooting himself in the head- and so begins a harrowing tour of a city and country shuddering through the aftershock of a devastating terrorist attack. In the tradition of Franz Kafka, Joseph Heller, and Don DeLillo, comes this extraordinary story of searing humor and sublime horror, of blindness, bewilderment, and that achingly familiar feeling that the world has suddenly stopped making sense. National Book Award finalist, 2006.

Jess Walter's novel The Zero takes place in the aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks in 2001. The hero is a policeman assigned to the disaster site in the months following the building's. Jess Walter is the author of six novels, including the bestsellers Beautiful Ruins and The Financial Lives of the Poets, the National Book Award finalist The Zero, and Citizen Vince, the winner of the Edgar Award for best novel.

Listen to Zero: A Novel audiobook by Jess Walter. Stream and download audiobooks to your computer, tablet or mobile phone. Bestsellers and latest releases.

View More by This Author. This book can be downloaded and read in Apple Books on your Mac or iOS device. The Zero is a groundbreaking novel, a darkly comic snapshot of our times that is already being compared to the works of Franz Kafka and Joseph Heller. From its opening pages-when hero cop Brian Remy wakes up to find he's shot himself in the head-novelist Jess Walter takes us on a harrowing tour of a city and a country shuddering through the aftershocks of a devastating terrorist attack. Requirements: This book can only be viewed on an iOS device with Apple Books on iOS 12 or later, iBooks . 1 or later and iOS . 3 or later, or a Mac with iBooks . or later and OS X 1. or later.

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The Zero is a groundbreaking novel, a darkly comic snapshot of our times that is already being compared to the works of Franz Kafka and Joseph Heller.

From its opening pages—when hero cop Brian Remy wakes up to find he's shot himself in the head—novelist Jess Walter takes us on a harrowing tour of a city and a country shuddering through the aftershocks of a devastating terrorist attack. As the smoke slowly clears, Remy finds that his memory is skipping, lurching between moments of lucidity and days when he doesn't seem to be living his own life at all. The landscape around him is at once fractured and oddly familiar: a world dominated by a Machiavellian mayor known as "The Boss," and peopled by gawking celebrities, anguished policemen peddling First Responder cereal, and pink real estate divas hyping the spoils of tragedy. Remy himself has a new girlfriend he doesn't know, a son who pretends he's dead, and an unsettling new job chasing a trail of paper scraps for a shadowy intelligence agency known as the Department of Documentation. Whether that trail will lead Remy to an elusive terror cell—or send him circling back to himself—is only one of the questions posed by this provocative yet deeply human novel.

From a novelist of astounding talent, The Zero is an extraordinary story of how our trials become our transgressions, of how we forgive ourselves and whether or not we should.

Reviews: 7
Kamick
Yesterday afternoon I finished reading The Zero by Jess Walter. This was one of those rare books that had me mesmerized, almost like I was living in the book (a very few movies are like that for me, too). The story takes place in the aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks on 9/11. The narrator was at the scene when it happened, and is involved in the investigations afterwards. However, he has "gaps" from which he comes back to consciousness having no idea where he is, why he is there, how he got there, or what he is supposed to be doing. His comments to others around him while he is completely clueless, and their reactions to his comments, remind me of Chauncey Gardener, the Peter Sellers character in "Being There." Since the reader only has access to what the narrator can witness and process in his moments of clarity, I became as disoriented as the main character was - and wanted to keep reading to see if any of it would ever come together to make any sense. The characters in the book, including the narrator, are like heightened versions of Anne Tyler's best misfit characters. The narrative often reminded me of William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury. Reading the book was like watching Being John Malkovitch - it is preposterous and totally believable at the same time. I will probably re-read this book several times. I can't help but think there are layers I missed the first time. And I love roller coasters!
Uscavel
Wow I don't even know what to say about this book. It was SO BORING and meandered around these daily interactions and conversations that were supposed to tell you things about the plot, but didn't. There was a lot of "social commentary" on 9/11 that never amounted to anything but small comments made by side characters that I never gave a sh*t about.

The whole plot was overly pretentious in an effort towards mysteriousness that never went anywhere. It was such a waste of time reading this. I got absolutely nothing but a headache from trying to follow the meaningless plot. It just felt like you put all this time in to getting to what was actually going on, only to find out that not much was really actually going on, that was just a good hook to make you buy it. Ugh. Annoying!
Ungall
As one of my colleagues said about this book, the trauma-resulting-in-fractured-narratives is getting really old, really quickly. Actually, it was old back in 2004. Nevertheless, this one's pretty good. There's some good humor embedded in what could otherwise be a pretty grim book given its subject matter.

Recommended post-9/11 literature.
Visonima
9/11 has a defining character. He's Brian Remy. A former cop who shot himself in the head in a failed suicide attempt, he is our post-9/11 everyman: amnesic, concerned, confused, implicit, helpless, desperate, loving, unfaithful, and profoundly human — living in a new reality to which he can relate in no consistent way and in which he's a constant stranger, even to himself.

This book is brilliantly contrived history, eminently truthful fiction. Jess Walter is a man of near-clairvoyant vision. Most important, he's a writer. What a writer.
TheFresh
I thought I knew and felt a lot about this National Tragedy, but Jess Walter has done the difficult job of taking us there and into new places on and under the ground (and the air too). His Novel enlightens and scares us together as his oblique retelling of the story form both within and without, showing the people who lived it and those watched it unfold from both near and far. His powerful and descriptive writng is mesmerising but hard to read as he is revealing things you did not know but that ring of truth! I did not devour this book as I did his others especially "Beautiful Ruins" and "Citizen Vince". This was because it was so dense and moving, its reality and power was absorbing and convincing. This is a book for those who want to know and feel more about this day and the special places that have changed virtually all of our lives as it has our memories.
Bukelv
Man. What a relief to see someone put our reaction to 9.11 into some kind of realistic perspective. And Walter's parody strikes this half blind reader as the perfect tool for the job.

All sense of reality is lost through the endless spiraling into neurotic realms where the truth constantly shifts like hallucinogenic images in a mirror at a mad, mad carnival. The distinction between main character Remy's dream world and the exterior reality surrounding him dissolves in a corrosive haze.
Kazracage
Reading Jess Walter reminds me of holding my breath and jumping out of the plum tree, back in the day. That delicious feeling of falling through space, knowing it's going to end soon, and that there will be a thud coming. Beautifully-crafted work, with a wonderful sense that something is just about to happen. I like this the best of all he's written.
An artful blend of the grit and horror of 9/11 and one officer's PTSD, overlayed with gentle humor...a seemingly possible combination. Thoroughly enjoyed this book!