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ISBN:0553275747
Author: John Knowles
ISBN13: 978-0553275742
Title: Peace Breaks Out
Format: azw lrf rtf docx
ePUB size: 1913 kb
FB2 size: 1577 kb
DJVU size: 1670 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Bantam (October 1982)

Peace Breaks Out by John Knowles



Peace Breaks Out book. Pete is a sensitive, handsome young war hero. With the unforgettable power and simplicity that made A Separate Peace into a modern classic, this masterful companion volume by John Knowles takes us once again on a warmly nostalgic journey through the poignancy of adolescence - and gives us another landmark portrayal of the dark side of the human heart.

Cover image via Goodreads. Peace Breaks Out by John Knowles. Summary from Goodreads: In the uneasy peace after World War II, the senior year at Devan School for Boys in New Hampshire changes from a time of friendship into a stunning drama of tragic betrayal. Knowles has a way of writing a book about schoolboys that is so much more than a book about schoolboys.

I read John Knowles book which is A Separate Peace last summer, also this book wrote by John Knowles Читать весь отзыв. Knowles's subsequent novels include Morning in Antibes (1962), A Vein of Riches (1978), which is set in his native West Virginia, and Peace Breaks Out (1981) which returns to the setting of A Separate Peace. He also wrote a non-fiction book, Double Vision: American Thoughts Abroad (1964). He remains best known, however, for his first novel. John Knowles has lived on Long Island, . since the early 1960s.

Peace Breaks Out is a flawed book, in my opinion. The plot is forced to twist around its thesis. One person found this helpful. It was not until 1981 that Knowles attempted a specific sequel, PEACE BREAKS OUT. The earlier book was set in 1942, when the clashes of personality in the secluded boys' school (Devon, a thinly-disguised version of Phillips Exeter) were a kind of studio rehearsal for what the boys would encounter all too soon overseas.

Peace Breaks Out (1981) is a novel by American author John Knowles, better known for A Separate Peace (1959). This book follows the story of Pete Hallam as he returns to the school and becomes a history teacher as well as a coach

Through marvelously descriptive narration and telling dialogue, Knowles dissects the adolescent mind of the boys who were faced with the horrors of World War II. In his follow-up novel, John Knowles again takes the reader to Devon, and explores the psyche of similar boys at the time just after the War. Though the story is a bit more confined than that in the first book, I think that it has to be. This new batch of characters must look to themselves for a reason for the way they are, rather than to the oppressive state of the world

Personal Name: Knowles, John, 1926-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Peace breaks out, John Knowles.

Peace breaks out. by Knowles, John. Publication date 1982. Publisher New York: Bantam. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. Contributor Internet Archive. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on August 5, 2011.

Peace Breaks Out Author: John Knowles. Genres: Literature & Fiction General Contemporary. by John Knowles. Published October 1999 by Tandem Library. Protected DAISY, In library. School & Library Binding.

“The best John Knowles has given us since A Separate Peace, and if you remember that book you will not want to miss this one.”—John Barkham Reviews   Pete is a sensitive, handsome young war hero. Wexford is a defiant, scheming troublemaker. Their lives collide in the uneasy days of peace after World War II as senior year at the Devon School changes from a time of friendships into a stunning drama of tragic betrayal.   With the unforgettable power and simplicity that made A Separate Peace into a modern classic, this masterful companion volume by John Knowles takes us once again on a warmly nostalgic journey through the poignancy of adolescence—and gives us another landmark portrayal of the dark side of the human heart.
Reviews: 7
Rageseeker
I loved A Separate Peace, and I loved this follow-up just as much, if not more. It captures the true impulsive nature of young men. Set in post World War Two America, it is a story about ego and revenge. It has the same tone as Salinger's Catcher in the Rye. I loved every page of it.
Mananara
IN HIGH SCHOOL THIS BOOK WAS ONE OF MY TOPS 10 BOOKS. I ALWAYS THOUGHT ABOUT IT, BECAUSE OF THE STORY. I WAS SO EXCITED TO GET IT. BRINGS BACK MEMORIES.
Truthcliff
Great book
GAZANIK
A Separate Peace is far, far better, but it wasn't a waste of time to read Peace Breaks Out.
KiddenDan
Although I knew of John Knowles’ A Separate Peace, I never read it. I found an old copy of Peace Breaks Out in a thrift shop for 50 cents and decided to read it and see what the fuss is about this lauded writer (It is not an Amazon purchase, but I buy a zillion books from Amazon and feel I want to rate Peace Breaks Out for my fellow Amazon readers.)

At first, I thought the lyrical writing was lovely and the setting of a prep school for boys, the fictional Devon in New Hampshire, totally engrossing. A veteran of WWII returns to the same school as a history teacher and athletic coach. He seems bitter, as one who was wounded, captured, and imprisoned as a prisoner of war - and escapes! As I write this review I realize how phony it sounds, a hero too good to be true but as I was reading the story, it did not register as such. There is the first chink in the wall, in retrospect.

Knowles intrudes, in my opinion, another phony element: the boys have a resentment that while they were too young, they were deprived of fighting for their country. The students are mostly from wealthy conservative families and carry their parents’ prejudices with them, anti-Semitism and other such solid, American values (the novel takes place in 1946). They are ripe for fascism in their narrow outlook and ironically blind to the fact that the war was fought to defeat fascism. They constantly banter jingoism.

The conflict concerns Wexford, the sociopathic editor of the school newspaper and Hochschwender, an American of German extraction (can you imagine a more German sounding name?) who is secretly a Nazi sympathizer.

There is an “incident” concerning the destruction of the school chapel’s window commemorating the former Devon alumni who were killed in the war, with a shockingly related turn of events, and there the story’s manipulation of Knowles’ thesis disappointed me.

SPOILER ALERT: Why were the police not involved in view of the accusation of one of the students? Why did the school nurse refuse to talk after she had full evidence of wrongdoing? Why wasn't Robert tenacious in his accusation?

My questions can be rationalized; however, Knowles didn’t answer them to move the plot more organically to further his thesis: Devon produces students who will become bankers, senators and other pillars of society in spite of their corrupted human nature.

It’s not a bad thesis and the subject is important, but in my opinion, Knowles forces the logic to fit the story around the thesis. It left me totally disappointed and feeling manipulated.

I will read A Separate Peace, his masterpiece, now out of curiosity to see what the fuss is about John Knowles. Peace Breaks Out is a flawed book, in my opinion. The plot is forced to twist around its thesis. Lyrical writing, of which I felt there was too much, is not enough to rescue this book, for me.
Nargas
I’m reading an Open Library scan again. Either superior software was used or someone took the time to edit the text.

Pete Hallam returns from war in 1945 to teach at the Devon School. As he unpacks old photos he mulls over his own wounds and friends and brother lost. His younger brother dead, team mates from hockey dead, injured in body and mind. Nothing dates a book more than a colleague’s wife addressed by her husband’s name rather than her own Christian Name.

Pete sounds like the kind of history teacher I wish I’d had in Grades 11&12 rather than the bore who had us underlining text while he droned on. Of course mine was no prep school and there were 40 students in the class. In a small discussion style class Pete is faced with two brilliant students who despise one another with an abiding hatred. As the author writes 700 teenage boys confined to a small-town campus, trouble is inevitable.
Fountain_tenderness
How do you follow a success such as John Knowles had with A SEPARATE PEACE in 1959? A New England prep-school novel that, despite the exclusive background of most of its characters, still appears on school book lists for summer reading. It was not until 1981 that Knowles attempted a specific sequel, PEACE BREAKS OUT. The earlier book was set in 1942, when the clashes of personality in the secluded boys' school (Devon, a thinly-disguised version of Phillips Exeter) were a kind of studio rehearsal for what the boys would encounter all too soon overseas. This sequel opens in 1945, when Pete Hallam, a wounded veteran of the Italian campaign, returns to his alma mater to teach history and coach games. It is a homecoming of a sort, but to a different world. Now, it is not the anticipation of war that troubles these boys, but their feeling of having missed out on the greatest challenge of their generation.

A therapist once told me that it is not so much the crisis that you need to watch out for -- people on the whole rise to crises -- but the aftermath. So the feeling that Knowles explores here is one I can understand, even when the violence latent in the rivalries between the boys explodes into something truly horrible. But several things held me back from buying into it entirely. I cannot ignore that Knowles was writing a quarter-century after the period he is describing, and there are several times when his 20/20 hindsight illuminates matters that I think were much more in flux, or less immediately apparent, at the time in question. The McCarthy purges, for instance, were then many years in the future, and yet it is obvious that the novel's emphasis on intolerance and witch-hunts could only have been written by a survivor of that era.

Nor can I entirely believe the setting. I should do, for my own equally exclusive shool in England was one of the models on which academies like Phillips were based. But even in the first novel, it seemed a little too hermetic and idyllic. Here, though, everything seems exaggerated: we veer between sentimentality about the dear old place and an intensity of verbal abuse (later escalating into physical bullying) that I cannot imagine being tolerated. But the latter is necessary to the plot, which begins in Pete Hallam's first seminar, in a vicious dispute between two seniors, a Midwesterner of German extraction called Hochschwender who affects neo-Fascist views, and a privileged kid called Wexford, who is editor of the school newspaper. Played out against a supporting cast of assorted jocks (sketchily portrayed for the most part), their rivalry will have tragic consequences, though not entirely in the ways one might expect.

I also wonder if Knowles allowed himself to be led astray by repeating the formula of his first book, in which all the significant events are acted out in the boys' world. But he missed an opportunity in the adult person of Pete Hallam, who comes back wounded in more ways than one. There are tantalizing hints of a dead soul here and its possible resurrection, but they are hidden under the worn school-story trope of the popular young master, an athletic hero almost like one of the boys. Yes, he is troubled by what he sees developing around him, and does most of the right things. But it remains curiously separate from his own malaise, thus weakening the one point that would have been truly interesting: that both sets of problems -- Pete's and the boys' -- are reflections of the moral exhaustion of the times.