» » In Lucia's Eyes
Download In Lucia's Eyes epub book
ISBN:140009612X
Author: Arthur Japin
ISBN13: 978-1400096121
Title: In Lucia's Eyes
Format: lrf lrf lrf mbr
ePUB size: 1327 kb
FB2 size: 1139 kb
DJVU size: 1372 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Vintage (February 13, 2007)
Pages: 256

In Lucia's Eyes by Arthur Japin



Title: In Lucia's Eyes. In Lucia's Eyes makes Lucia a figure well worthy of a place in the Casanova mythology ) In Lucia's Eyes can be read as a sly riff on the kind of 18th century novel where a young innocent is forced to leave his or her home - in this case, the Italian country estate where Lucia was born - and proceeds to learn the ways of the wicked, wicked world ) In Lucia's Eyes has its flaws. Some of the characters Lucia runs into often speak in an interchangeable way.

Uniform Title: Schitterend gebrek. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Following his hugely acclaimed debut, The Two Hearts of Kwasi Boachi ( Fascinatingly ambitious. Lucia works as a servant girl in Italy and is engaged to be married. But after the pox disfigures her face, she flees in shame without telling her lover.

Lucia works as a servant girl in Italy and is engaged to be married. Years later, as a reknowned Amsterdam courtesan who never goes out without her veil, Lucia is at the theater when she recognizes her long-lost fiancé, Giacomo Casanova; and she cannot resist the opportunity to encounter him again. Based on a woman who appeared briefly in Casanova’s legendary diaries, Lucia emerges as a brilliant woman who becomes every bit his match

But this book does not read like historical fiction. Possibly it is the translation from Dutch into English which rendered this into a snooty sudo intellectual novel on the nature of suffering. Maybe it is the translation which made all of the words in this book into things rarely seen in dictionaries. not "any mouth game we could make of it" or something weird like that. Read it and see for yourself.

Download Cover Image. His cunning narrative takes the reader on an entrancing journey from the canals of Amsterdam to those of Venice, painting a glorious portrait of the eighteenth century with all its contradictions of reason and instinct, wit and sensuality, head and heart. In Lucia’s Eyes is an elegant and moving story of love denied and transformed.

In his memoirs Casanova tells of being invited to the country estate of Pasiano as a sixteen-year-old and falling hopelessly in love with the breathtaking Lucia, two years his junior. She has only one splendid flaw: ‘She is too young. Because of Lucia’s genuine innocence he does not bed her, promising instead to return in six months to ask for her hand in marriage. When Casanova returns to the Italian manor, Lucia has disappeared, supposedly because she has become.

The book became a bestseller and is considered a classic of modern Dutch literature. His second book, De droom van de leeuw (2002), is a novelized version of his relationship with the Dutch actress and novelist Rosita Steenbeek in Rome, where Steenbeek became the last lover of the Italian director Federico Fellini. 2003: Een schitterend gebrek, novel, translated as In Lucia's Eyes. 2006: De klank van sneeuw, two stories. 2006: De grote wereld, Book Week Gift. 2007: De overgave, novel, winner of the 2008 NS Publieksprijs, translated as Someone Found.

Casanova described her in his autobiography as one of only two women he had wronged. He was 17 when they fell in love. When they met again, years later in an Amsterdam brothel, she was repulsively disfigured and he had no idea how she got there.

Lucia works as a servant girl in Italy and is engaged to be married. But after the pox disfigures her face, she flees in shame without telling her lover. Years later, as a reknowned Amsterdam courtesan who never goes out without her veil, Lucia is at the theater when she recognizes her long-lost fiancé, Giacomo Casanova; and she cannot resist the opportunity to encounter him again. Based on a woman who appeared briefly in Casanova’s legendary diaries, Lucia emerges as a brilliant woman who becomes every bit his match. In Lucia’s Eyes is an elegant and moving story of love denied and transformed.
Reviews: 7
Geny
Japin's second novel is a beautiful work of historical fiction. His descriptions of the times, the places, the clothes and fashions and thoughts and activities - perfect. The dialogue, the attitudes, the games his people play - all dead right. Even Japin's weaving together the fictional and nonfictional source material (mostly Casanova's autobiography) is done most skillfully and believably. It is a beautiful work. I enjoyed every page of the book.
Brannylv
Best book I have read for ages! The authors use of descriptive and emotive language was superb. The language made the book a pleasure from start to finish. Very happy. Will also read the authors other book/s.
Gardataur
I really hate to not finish a book, no matter how much I dislike the book in question. But this novel, which seemed so promising according to the other reviews, was just not readable.

I liked the premise, Casanova's only lost love turns out to have run away in shame after being disfigured by smallpox, and later they meet and engage in a battle of the genders when she is a prostitute in Amsterdam.

But this book does not read like historical fiction. Possibly it is the translation from Dutch into English which rendered this into a snooty sudo intellectual novel on the nature of suffering. Maybe it is the translation which made all of the words in this book into things rarely seen in dictionaries. I mean, normal English isn't exactly a bad language for describing things. Sometimes a kiss is just a kiss, a smile is just a smile....not "any mouth game we could make of it" or something weird like that.

Anyway, the language of this book killed me. I lost interest by page 100, and I quite without finishing.

Two stars.
Malaris
I know now there is no one out there delivering like Amazon...
Kardana
I LOVED "In Lucia's Eyes"! I enjoyed it so much that I may immediately re-read it. Segments resonated and clarified universal themes: love, education, cosmetic and internal disfigurement, etc. And, the manner of presentation was intimate, thought-provoking, and timely.

Samples:

"The profound peace I feel in libraries goes beyond silence. The paper doesn't just muffle sound but stills the roar of my thoughts... [and] things written down are easier to let go of."

"The attraction of ruins is one whose explanation I shall expect in the hereafter! What allure could there be about a heap of rubble?"

The Author's birth year (1956) and nationality (Holland) are significant in that the book takes place mostly in Amsterdam and much has changed, while other things have not... in 250 years!

For me, the book's locale/subject had some meaning: I visited Amsterdam when I was about 20. At that time, "a must" tourist attraction was to view whores who were displayed in street-level windows. With only three days to see the sights, I went. Then, I was too young; but now, because of this book, I know more.

With Lucia, in the 1750's, we listen to her step-by-step analysis of her life. She describes her peasant frivolities, her loving parents, how she comes to be educated, what friendships and employers augment her growth, and we mature with her.

She details her love, explains the milieu of the social classes, the medical profession, and Amsterdam's bizarre attitude toward prostitution. And ultimately... Well, I was surprised with the ending, comfortable as it was. The developments are both enjoyable and eye-opening.

In "In Lucia's Eyes", theatrics, ancestry, and cosmetics (or veils) are treated in more ways than one. The reader learns in the Author's Postscript (Arthur Japin, author, actor) that the BACKGROUND of an anecdote, a play the characters attend, exists. Jacques Japin (ancestor of the author?) wrote the play within, in 1747. We also learn that Lucia may actually be "buried in a churchyard of St. Paul's in Flatbush, New York". Even the typeface of the book is documented as having significant timeliness. Therefore, the depth is both playful and serious.

Okay, so the book feels real and the details hit resonating chords. But more importantly, the theme is: "The blessing of love is not in being loved, it IS in loving." We, the reader, are shown the evolution of learning to accept oneself. Further, "We MUST give away the thing we most long for." And, writing DOES liberate. I agree.

I gave this book a four-star rating (less than a perfect five), because there were a few transitions that were not as crystal clear as they might have been. Those wrinkles were momentary hiccups and that's all. Perhaps when I re-read the book, I'll blame the continuity snags on my own alertness when reading.

In any case, I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I highly recommend it. Lucia had a happy childhood. She searched for betterment. She used admirable good ethics, survival tactics, and cleverness and she tenderly orchestrated the life she was dealt.

Thus, "In Lucia's Eyes" by Arthur Japin, translated by David Colmer, a journey ascends and enriches the reader. Read it and see for yourself.
Aloo
In Pasiano, Italy fourteen years old virginal servant Lucia works in a noble house. There she meets seventeen years old just as virginal seminarian student Giacomo Casanova. The youngsters fall in love until she Lucia catches smallpox that scars her face terribly. Unable to face her lover, she runs off Giacomo before fleeing across Europe.

She earns her way doing various jobs especially as a prostitute to those every other fallen woman rejected. Eventually she becomes Madam Galathee de Pompignac running a popular brothel in Amsterdam and using a sexy veil to hide her visage while also making her mysterious to her clients. Casanova, renowned as the seducer le Chevalier de Seingalt, meets his first love and they wager a war of words, wit, and a challenge to determine whose gender is the stronger.

This fascinating historical tale provides a different look at Casanova through the eyes of his first love. Her trials and tribulations turn her into a strong intelligent woman during an era when females were not expected to show any wit. The period is vividly described, though at times the window into the mid eighteenth century overwhelms the battle of the sexes. Still Arthur Japin provides a solid gender war that humanizes the legendary lover as he competes in a fierce skirmish of the mind and the body against his greatest opponent, his first love.

Harriet Klausner