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ISBN:087113781X
Author: Douglas Galbraith
ISBN13: 978-0871137814
Title: The Rising Sun: A Novel
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ePUB size: 1869 kb
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DJVU size: 1891 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Pr; 1st American ed edition (March 30, 2001)
Pages: 352

The Rising Sun: A Novel by Douglas Galbraith



Now in paperback, Douglas Galbraith's The Rising Sun is an extraordinary tour de force of historical fiction in the tradition of Caleb Carr's The Alienist and David Liss's A Conspiracy of Paper. The Rising Sun: A Novel Paperback – January 9, 2002. by. Douglas Galbraith (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

914 21. Personal Name: Galbraith, Douglas. Publication, Distribution, et. London. Download book The rising sun, Douglas Galbraith.

Now in paperback, Douglas Galbraith's The Rising Sun is an extraordinary tour de force of historical fiction in the tradition of Caleb Carr's The Alienist and David Liss's A Conspiracy of Paper.

They say the mad hear demons calling to them, as clear as a man in the street calling their names. I heard tell once that they would be mad and happy all their lives were it not for these voices. It is the voices that drive them to their destruction; moral, physical or both. So it may be with my numbers.

The Rising Sun. (2000) A novel by Douglas Galbraith. The Rising Sun is a tour de force of historical fiction, an extraordinary first novel from a major new talent that vividly brings to life the age of adventure-from the bustling atmosphere of Edinburgh in the exuberance of the early days of the Scottish Enlightenment, to the danger and deprivations of seventeenth-century seafaring, to the savage horrors of colonial life in. the tropics.

You will not be able to put this book down.

The Rising Sun: A Novel Douglas Galbraith The Rising Sun is a tour de force of historical fiction, an extraordinary first novel from a major new talent that vividly brings to life the age of adventure-from the bustling atmosphere of Edinburgh in the exuberance of the early days of the Scottish Enlightenment, to the danger and deprivations of seventeenth-century seafaring, t.

This book goes to the very heart of relations between parents and children, men and women, and between races and nations - to the heart of what it is to be alive. Douglas Galbraith was born in Glasgow in 1965 and is the author of three novels, The Rising Sun, A Winter in China, and King Henry. He lives in Scotland.

Roderick Mackenzie, the superintendant of cargoes for the ship The Rising Sun describes a daring expedition to establish a Scottish colony in Central America, the perilous voyage to the northern coast of what is now Panama, the intrigues and rivalries of his fellow colonists, and the tragic consequences of the mission. A first novel. 35,000 first printing.
Reviews: 7
Mori
This historical fiction covers an incident in history about which I was completely ignorant: the attempt by folks from Scotland to establish a colony in Central America, specifically in Panama. It's a well-written tale, with sharp characterizations and quite descriptive passages. It's a tale that the reader knows ends in sorrow and tragedy, but he keeps on with it, because of the clarity of the writing that conveys the sense of initial optimism, and then the growing knowledge, even if unspoken, that the enterprise is doiomed to failure. The narrator is a likeable young man, and we follow his progress of ups and downs closely. The key to good writing is to make the reader interested in your main antagonist, and in this aspcet the author has succeeded admirably. Read the book if for nothing else than finding out about a little known aspect of world, and Scottish, history.
Quemal
I had relatives involved at Darien so this was genealogical in nature.
Legend 33
I bought this book as a Christmas gift, and it came very quickly and in excellant condition, as it was advertised.
VariesWent
Interesting tid-bits of history to show how far we have fallen because our government chose to inflate our money at our expense!
Dishadel
Epic. 535 pages for the hardcover edition.
As you can read in the other reviews, this tale covers a young man's participation in an expedition to set-up a Dutch colony in Panama in 1698. The story goes into deep detail about the protagonist's background, thoughts and experiences. It does much to provide needed insight as to the living conditions of the period and the people. However, it does get very tedious at times and makes you wonder whether to not read further. I did make it to the end, and, after all of invested time, found the conclusion rather flat. Also complicating the reading of this book as it is written to make it seem like a period novel (a la Dickens). However, it is overdone and it hindered my understanding at some points. Also, the author does liberally jump around chronologically in telling the story. Another bother, at times. So, the author did put a tremendous effort into writing this tale, but, I came away wondering if it were worth the investment of my time to get through this.
Ustamya
I saw this book and picked it up on a whim. I cannot put my finger on exactly what attracted me to the book, however, I am extremely glad that I bought it and stayed with the story through the first 50 or so difficult pages.

The book chronicles the disastrous Darien Scheme (which I confess I had never heard of prior to purchasing the book), and its political and social repercussions for the nation of Scotland. The book is narrated by an ambitious young man named Roderick Mackenzie who comes to Edinburgh the callow second son of country gentry forced to seek his fortune in commerce. Our narrator quickly learns the shady aspects of business through his amoral and manipulative employer, Colquhoun, and the ways of drunken debauchery and women (for a price) with his fellow young fellow lodgers (who are careful to be seen attending church after a long night enjoying the favors of the ladies of ill repute at the Widow Gilbert's house).

As superintendent cargos Mackenzie relates his perspective of the expedition though his diary. The journey over the Atlantic and late seventeenth century Edinburgh are described in breathtaking detail. The struggles (physical, moral and spiritual) of the colony are set out with heart wrenching precision, as the idealistic colonists wage a forlorn multi-front war with the Spanish military, English greed, tropical disease, the jungle, the torrential rains and, ultimately, themselves.

It would be easy to describe this book as a male-oriented "adventure" novel (which many reviewers have) or as a detailed and lively "historical fiction." Both characterizations (as well as others that would be equally appropriate) are correct, but fail to give this astonishing work its full due. Ultimately The Rising Sun is a novel about idealism, opportunism and aspiration. Mackenzie, like all of the Darien colonists to one extent or another, wants to be part of something bigger than himself. As the self proclaimed witness to these great events, he sees first-hand the hopes of a nation sore, the petty intrigues of the colony as amid the death and squalor of the colony the delusional Patterson and vainglorious Drummon squabble over utilization of the colony's scare resources for the construction of their ultimately worthless prized projects (the "road" to the pacific and a useless fort, respectively), and the manipulations of the "great men" who, knowing that the colony was doomed to utter failure by the machinations of England, sold their shares in the Company of Scotland.

For some reason, I had a difficult time initially dealing with the author's writing style for the first 50 or so pages, but from that point on the prose flowed very well. I cannot recommend this book highly enough, and I eagerly await the next title to be released by this author in the United States.
HeonIc
Very well written story about an episode of history you don't often hear about. I read it many years ago, saw it on my shelf last night and came here looking to see if the author had written anything else. Sadly this appears to still be his only published novel. But well worth the time to read.
Not bad for a debut novel as Galbreath has good descriptive powers. However, the narrative tends to drag on and none of the characters really shine. There is some humor but overall a sense of impending doom throughout, and rightly so, since this is an account of the now obscure and tragically failed Scottish attempt to launch a colonial trading empire in Panama at Darien in the 1690s.