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ISBN:076531391X
Author: Chelsea Quinn Yarbro
ISBN13: 978-0765313911
Title: Roman Dusk: A Novel of the Count Saint-Germain (St. Germain)
Format: mobi doc mobi lit
ePUB size: 1340 kb
FB2 size: 1609 kb
DJVU size: 1927 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (September 19, 2006)
Pages: 352

Roman Dusk: A Novel of the Count Saint-Germain (St. Germain) by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro



Book 19 of 25 in the Saint-Germain Series. Chelsea Quinn Yarbro is both a Grand Master of the World Horror Convention and a Living Legend of the International Horror Guild. She lives in Berkeley, California. Saint-Germain is forever the exile, always helping people with the medicine he has learned in his very, very long life, the money he has learned to acquire either in shipping or as an alchemist, actually making gold and jewels. He is a good man. He is more human, for all that he would disagree with that assessment, than most of his fellow people.

Roman Dusk : A Novel of the Count Saint-Germain. Book in the Saint-Germain Series). by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago. I have been reading Yarbro's Saint-Germain stories since Hotel Transylvania first came out - and I have loved them all, including the Olivia and Madalaine novels. I have them all and I will never give them away.

Roman Dusk (Saint-Germain The child-emperor, Heliogabalus, diverts the Roman populace with parties, circuses, and celebrations, while his mother and grandmother jockey for power behind the scenes. The government is riddled with scandal and no business is conducted without bribes which grow ever larger. Religions joust for prominence, with factions of Christians seeking to overthrow the ancient Roman pantheon. Courtesans, once honored for their skills and protected by special guards, have become targets of opprobrium.

A Tom Doherty Associates book. Set in decadent third-century . Rome, Yarbro's 19th volume in her majestic fantasy series (after 2005's Dark of the Sun) is one of her finest yet to feature heroic vampire Saint-Germain, here known as Ragoczy Germainus Sanct-Franciscus. Despite his wealth, discretion and careful observance of the social niceties, Sanct-Franciscus must be careful as a foreigner. All his precautions, however, can't prevent an official from placing a spy in his household and targeting him for tax evasion and worse

Chelsea Quinn Yarbro. In the unsettled time when Imperial Rome totters on the brink of collapse, the vampire Ragoczy Germainus Sanct' Franciscus-the Count Saint-Germain-finds himself targeted by a corrupt Roman official and accused of bribery, tax evasion, and treason. The storm that hovers over the vampire grows darker when he is accused of corrupting Ignatia, a young virgin. Her brother, a zealous covert to the new religion of Christianity, threatens to purify Saint-Germain with fire

Part of Saint-Germain series by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro. The Coan linen has finally arrived, on the Morning Wind, and all but two of the bales are in fine condition; one of the damaged bales cannot be salvaged, but the other can be, at least two-thirds of it. I have set my slaves to cleaning and blocking the linen to restore it, and I will see to it that the best possible results are obtained, and will provide you a record of what was done. You are fortunate to have so many of your ships reach port unscathed, and the cargos damaged by nothing more than weather.

A novel of the count saint-germain. Chelsea Quinn Yarbro. A tom doherty associates book. This is a work of fiction. All of the characters, organizations, and events portrayed in this novel are either products of the author's imagination or are used fictitiously.

The books of the Saint-Germain Cycle combine historic fiction, romance, and horror and feature the heroic vampire first introduced in Hôtel Transylvania as Le Comte de Saint-Germain. Yarbro was the first writer to revise the stereotype so completely and mesh it so fully with romance. Although romantic and historical fiction, Hôtel Transylvania and consequent novels also belong firmly within the canon of modern horror: the mortal inhabitants of the natural world are the forces of darkness and the supernatural "monster" is the defender of sanity and morality. As the author has noted, "history is horror.

Chelsea Quinn Yarbro. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Personal Name: Yarbro, Chelsea Quinn, 1942-. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Roman dusk : a novel of the Count Saint-Germain, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro.

Rome is crumbling. The child-emperor, Heliogabalus, diverts the Roman populace with parties, circuses, and celebrations, while his mother and grandmother jockey for power behind the scenes. The government is riddled with scandal and no business is conducted without bribes which grow ever larger. Religions joust for prominence, with factions of Christians seeking to overthrow the ancient Roman pantheon. Courtesans, once honored for their skills and protected by special guards, have become targets of opprobrium. The vampire Ragoczy Germanius Sanct' Franciscus, already subject to extra taxes and regulations because he is a foreigner, falls under the maleficent eye of Telemachus Batsho, a minor functionary who dreams of power and wealth. When Franciscus thwarts his attempts to extort ever-increasing sums from a young Roman of good birth, Batsho swears revenge. Franciscus finds his activities closely monitored and is accused of treason and conspiracy. His friends, threatened with similar scrutiny, abandon him to Batsho's mercies or urge him to leave the Eternal City.But Franciscus has many ties to Rome. He has taken under his protection a beautiful courtesan who was brutally beaten by the very men who should have been protecting her. She has been the vampire's sustenance for many months. Franciscus is also held in the city by the plight of the family Laelius. The Domina's health is failing despite the vampire's great medical skills; her son has converted to Christianity and rails against his mother's beliefs; her daughter Ignatia, who has sacrified her own life to care for her mother, realizes that when her mother dies, her fate will rest in the hands of her increasingly fanatical brother. Determined to claim pleasure for herself, Ignatia invites Franciscus's attentions, inflaming him with the power of her untapped sexuality. Unfortunately, they are not unobserved, and their simple yet powerful act of love sparks a conflagration that destroys Ignatia's family and nearly brings about the vampire's True Death.
Reviews: 7
Gindian
Has Yarbro written very similar novels about Saint- Germain? Yes, she has. Yet I continue to read them and she continues to write them. Saint-Germain is forever the exile, always helping people with the medicine he has learned in his very, very long life, the money he has learned to acquire either in shipping or as an alchemist, actually making gold and jewels. He is a good man. He is more human, for all that he would disagree with that assessment, than most of his fellow people. I care about his adventures. I care that he "lives."

This book is set in Rome in the third century, called the Decadence. The child- emperor Heliogabalus diverts the Roman people with circuses and sibarytic parties. While his tax collectors rob the populace blind -- or try to in Sanctus- Franciscus' case. Meanwhile, factions of Christians are jockeying for control. (I would have preferred to hear about Peterine groups instead of Paulists. Paulists I recognize, Peterines would have been new to me.) There is a tax collector and a Paulist who are out to get Sanctus- Franciscus. There is also a woman dying from lead poisoning who he attempts to help -- and she is massively unlikeable. Was she horrible before lead poisoning or did it make her a harridan? Was there a before lead poisoning for her-- she talks about it as a disease in her family...

My daughter used to love the Magic Tree house books. They had the same characters time- traveling to different times and places. She learned history that way. I prefer these days to read my history in historical fiction, it feels more "real." I like reading history through Saint- Germain's lens.

But other reviewes here are correct, this may not be the best place to enter Saint- Germain's universe for first- time readers. While there is a chronology in how Yarbro wrote these books, I don't generally believe it needs to be carefully followed. If Hotel Transylvania is convenient read it, or read Darker Jewels or Out of the House of Life.
Samutilar
I love this series because each book takes me into a different era and place, many of which I know next to nothing about. Yarbro obviously puts a great deal of effort into her research, and is an exceptionally vivid storyteller with a gift for lyrical writing. However, I can't escape the conclusion that the series is getting rather tired.

This latest instalment in the St-Germain series essentially follows exactly the same plot structure as its predecessors: hero attracts suspicion from xenophobic locals, despite his acts of charity and almost indefatigable niceness; a beautiful but lonely and tortured love interest; long angst-ridden conversations between St-Germain and his manservant, most of which tell us what we already know; and inevitably, events spiralling out of control and endangering the protagonists. As always, the setting (here, the late Roman Empire) is depicted well, and Yarbro gives a strong sense of time and place, sometimes to an uncomfortable degree: for example, a description of the so-called "entertainment" in the arena, during Heliogabalus's three day Games, turned even my relatively strong stomach.

However, the formulaic nature of the plot meant that it was only the history that held my interest, as well as my attachment to St Germain as a character. I cared little for Doma Ignatia or Melidulci, and I find the "love" scenes almost impossible to read now (in fact, I skimmed them, in this one); we are constantly reminded that St-Germain has lived for thousands of years, that he is haunted and tormented by loss and depression; that Roger and Olivia worry about him ... and so on. In every St-Germain novel, and this one is no different, there is an element of exposition - ie. that he is a vampire but not evil, references to previous love interests, etc - which is helpful to any reader coming to the series for the first time, but gets a little repetitive for someone who knows the character well.

Also, another reviewer commented that because the series has been written out of chronological order, most readers who have followed it will know that he survives into the 20th century, so any threat to his life in a book set in an earlier period fails to provoke any real sense of apprehension. I think this is a valid point.

Nonetheless, this novel is still beautifully written, and worth a read just for the history alone. However I wonder whether St-Germain ought to be given a rest for a while, and some new characters' stories told.
Ddilonyne
I bought this book because I love historical fiction and love to read about ancient Rome. This was just not a good read. The conversations the characters have with each other take five to six paragraphs to get to the point (one even went on for two pages before the one character asked the question he had to ask). There are several letters, pretty much one every chapter, which gets alittle annoying as they are from different people but all have the same tone. No one does correspondence better than Colleen McCullough; when she writes for Pompey you can practically hear him talking. I'm not much into the vampire thing, but I thought this would be interesting because the main character has been un-dead for I believe two thousand years, and finding him in Roman times seemed like it would be entertaining. But the author never tells about him "feeding", and other vampire-like things. Guess I'll stick to straight historical fiction from now on.
Steelrunner
I have been reading Yarbro's Saint-Germain stories since Hotel Transylvania first came out - and I have loved them all, including the Olivia and Madalaine novels. I have them all and I will never give them away. Whenever I'm tired of today's news, and politics and other daily things that might bring me down, I pick up one of the Saint-Germain's and I travel back in time - CQY's descriptions of the places and times and the historical figures are impressive and immerse me mentally to a point where I can "forget" about today for a least a little while - and Saint-Germain is always so strong, intelligent and compassionate - I've often wished that I could have met him.

I don't want to spoil the plot for CQY's fans - but "Roman Dusk" will be a favorite of any Saint-Germain fan - or for those who like to read about times and places in the past.