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ISBN:0981570143
Author: William L. Sullivan
ISBN13: 978-0981570143
Title: The Ship in the Hill
Format: mobi doc lrf lit
ePUB size: 1144 kb
FB2 size: 1585 kb
DJVU size: 1256 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Navillus Pr (April 13, 2010)
Pages: 352

The Ship in the Hill by William L. Sullivan



William L. Sullivan (Goodreads Author). This historical novel is based on the true story of the excavation of a Viking burial ship from a hill in Norway in 1904. The find dumbfounded archeologists because it was the most elaborate Viking grave ever discovered, yet the bones in the grave belonged to a woman. I loved how this book blended the excavation of an actual Viking ship and the lives that the women found in the ship might have led in the 800's. Weaving some of what really happened, myth, legend and good old fashioned imagination the author brings to life the story of Asa of Agthir and the fictional Dr. Kirstin Williams. I think the author did a great job of taking t (Disclaimer: Won through Goodreads "First Reads", signed copy from author.

William L. Sullivan is the author of three novels and a dozen nonfiction books. degree in English at Cornell University under Alison Lurie, studied linguistics at Germany's Heidelberg University, and earned an . in German at the University of Oregon. I've read several books by William L Sullivan, as he is a local author here in Oregon. This is the best one I've read so far. The story jumps back and forth between 800 AD and 1904 AD, as the women connected to this ship are dealing with it.

This historical novel is based on the true story of the excavation of a Viking burial ship from a hill in Norway in 1904.

In 2011, Sullivan published The Ship in the Hill. The book is a work of fiction about Vikings. Cooper aircraft hijacking. Sullivan's most recent book was published in 2014. It is a collection of short stories, entitled Oregon Variations: Stories Most of his books were published by Navillus Press, a publishing company owed by Sullivan. Here is a list of his published books as of 2016:.

William Sullivan’s The Ship in the Hill is perfect for our Month of Norway! You cannot have a month focusing on Norway without Vikings. Sullivan delivers Vikings and great drama. It will help keep you hiking throughout the year.

The Ship in the Hill. By: William L. Sullivan. Narrated by: William L. Length: 12 hrs and 20 mins. Rich with humor and natural history, this memoir describes 25 summers of back-to-the-earth adventure as author William L. Sullivan and his wife Janell build a log cabin by hand along a roadless river deep in the wilds of Oregon's Coast Range. Along the way they confront beaver in the refrigerator, raise a family, and puzzle out a murder mystery that had haunted their homestead site. Cabin Fever takes listeners to a warm world of kerosene lamplight, wood stoves, and ghost stories that may be true. Good book; glad I listened. By Danny B. on 11-27-17.

A fifth-generation Oregonian, Sullivan began hiking at the age of five and has been exploring new trails ever since. Like the counties, these tales are all over the map, ranging from flash fiction to science fiction. Sullivan's third work of fiction is The Ship in the Hill (1-minute video) a historical novel based on the true story of the excavation of a Viking longship on a Norwegian farm in 1904.

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William Sullivan - the complete book list. Oregon's bestselling author, William L. Sullivan, takes us on a wild ride with Portland police detective Neil Ferguson and his prescient, autistic daughter Susan as they set out to solve another of Oregon's enduring mysteries The Darkest Hours. In Boonesboro West Virginia lives a young man named Bobby. This historical novel is based on the true story of the excavation of a Viking burial ship from a hill in Norway in 1904 The Secret of the Incas.

This historical novel is based on the true story of the excavation of a Viking burial ship from a hill in Norway in 1904. The find dumbfounded archeologists because it was the most elaborate Viking grave ever discovered, yet the bones in the grave belonged to a woman. Historians had assumed that the Viking world -- and certainly Viking ships -- were ruled by men. Who was this woman? The Ship in the Hill alternates chapters between the archeologists unearthing the ship and the Viking queen who sailed it a thousand years before.
Reviews: 7
Xisyaco
Having known Bill Sullivan for his Oregon hiking guides, I was not sure he could pull off a non-hiking book. How wrong I was. I purchased the Kindle version and happily read it on my smartphone and occasionally my Kindle. Call it spell binding, call it historical, call it a thriller, just get it. I recently met Bill while speaking at a banquet and mentioned how much I had enjoyed this book. To my surprise, he said he is letting the book sell itself by "word-of-mouth". So let me add my voice to those who have praised the book. Having finally finished the book, I look forward to reading more of his fiction... historical or not!
Bandiri
I've read several books by William L Sullivan, as he is a local author here in Oregon. This is the best one I've read so far. The story jumps back and forth between 800 AD and 1904 AD, as the women connected to this ship are dealing with it. This is an "edge of your seat" story, and well worth the read.
Frosha
I attended a gathering regarding Norway and Sweden where I heard about this book. The book is OUTSTANDING! I ordered it
from Amazon and as usual it was shipped immediately and in the condition described. I'll gladly use this provider again.
Uylo
I am Norwegian, with an interest in history and archaeology, and at first I was surprised that this was fiction, and a bit put off by the magical elements and the linkages he creates between the 800s and the early 1900s. Then the story gripped me and I raced through to the finish - even though I knew very well how it all ended, in both periods:) I have to praise the language in particular - so often novelists mangle the language by forcing Norse on the English, but here that was handled smoothly - I particularly loved the geographical detail. I would recommend this book to anybody with an interest in the Sagas, who likes a good yarn and strong women characters, or who just like a good book and dragon-headed ships.
Ranicengi
A bookseller recommended Bill Sullivan's novel to me. As a writer of historical novels based on the lives of real people or actual historical events, I'm always looking for great stories and to see how other authors handle the history. The Ship in the Hill is one of those great ones! I loved how Mr. Sullivan moved back and forth between the 9th Century and early 20th Century with such ease. His two two strong female protagonists kept my interest and made me wonder about women in the Viking culture and their influence as well as speculating about women involved in archeology at the turn of the century. His characters were authentic and intriguing. The well-researched history had just the right amount of detail but not so much you think you're reading a history book. The facts supported the richness of the story. I'd been familiar with Mr. Sullivan's nonfiction work and hadn't been aware of this book. But when a bookseller I respect says "This is a great book I think you'd like" I listen. I'm so pleased I did and I hope you'll consider reading this book as well.
Lemana
Very engaging read. William L. Sullivan's characters come to life as we journey between two times. As archeologists uncover an incredible grave fit for a great man, they're stunned when the remains belong to a woman. Alternating chapters bring this mystery, filled with rich history, to life.

It's a turbulent journey of clever survival, and at times, extreme hardship the female characters make in this male dominated Viking world while archeologists are trying to unravel the mystery hundreds of years later. Vivid description of landscape and culture make this book hard to put down, a definite must-read.
Shaktiktilar
Excellent Book. The Ship in the Hill is well researched, and well crafted in telling the story of peoples in two different cultures, but related by history. The two heroines, a woman in 800 and a woman in 1905 feel real to me as to their culture and their personalities. My primary criteria for any book is, do I care about these people?
As historical fiction it hits the mark, bringing to life a incident that begs to be explained (why a ship buried in a hill?) through characters who, because of Mr. Sullivan's thorough research, live true to their time. The reader feels the landscape, both physical and emotional.
The links in the story to the Norse sagas is fascinating and this story carries much of the feels of a saga in that it has mystery, danger, excitement, great characters, and just that touch of the mystic sense of the playfullness of the Gods - just when you think you've got it locked, they pull away the key. I do care about these people!
I highly recommend this book.
p.s. I've only lately come to reading William Sullivan's books. I will be reading more.
I just read this delightful novel that will appeal to many fans of the Viking world and the Middle Ages in general. "The Ship in the Hill" tells the story of the excavation of the Oseberg ship burial in 1904, and in alternate chapters also tells the story of Asa, the queen thought to be buried in the ship, set in Norway, 825-881. Sullivan isn't a medievalist by trade, but he reads Old Norse and did a lot of research for the book both here in the US and in Norway. I teach Beowulf and Icelandic sagas, and know the languages, so I can tell Sullivan has done his homework; but he's not a scholar, he's a novelist, with a great knack for description (especially of natural settings), character and dialogue. The book is lively reading, and incredibly interesting in its subject matter. I liked it a lot, and was quick to recommend it to my medieval students for summer reading.