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ISBN:0765347083
Author: Sean McMullen
ISBN13: 978-0765347084
Title: Glass Dragons (The Moonworlds Saga)
Format: lrf azw lit doc
ePUB size: 1743 kb
FB2 size: 1378 kb
DJVU size: 1304 kb
Language: English
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Tor Fantasy; Mass Paperback Edition edition (February 1, 2005)

Glass Dragons (The Moonworlds Saga) by Sean McMullen



Series: The Moonworlds Saga (Book 2). Hardcover: 496 pages. Glass Dragons is Sean McMullen's direct sequel to Voyage of the Shadowmoon. Like the previous book, it is set on a fantasy world, the moon of a large planet, inhabited by people who seem very human though turn out (with one exception) not to be: they have double hearts, for instance. In the first book, an entire continent is destroyed by a terrible weapon, which is only destroyed by the heroic efforts of a large contingent of characters - some of whom end up not quite so heroic by the end.

Sean McMullen (Author). Book 2 of 4 in the Moonworlds Saga Series.

Solid entry in the Moonworlds saga. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 8 years ago. More sedately paced and less focused than Voyage of the Shadowmoon, but still an enjoyable read. Includes characters from the first book (Terikel & Velander play fairly substantial parts), but I was hoping for more from Laron.

Find the complete Moonworlds Saga book series by Sean McMullen. Great deals on one book or all books in the series. Moonworlds Saga Book Series. Authors: Sean McMullen. The Moonworlds Saga book series by Sean McMullen includes books Voyage of the Shadowmoon, Voidfarer: A Tale of the Moonworlds Saga, Glass Dragons, and several more. Voyage of the Shadowmoon. Voidfarer: A Tale of the Moonworlds Saga

Glass Dragons is Sean McMullen's direct sequel to Voyage of the Shadowmoon.

Australian author McMullen writes like Roger Zelazny at the peak of his powers: his dashing, flamboyant, cleverly resourceful characters trade off insults and reveal surprising abilities as they swagger bravely from one hair-raising scene to another.

2004) (The second book in the Moonworlds series) A novel by Sean McMullen. Glass Dragons continues the tale of Laron, the chivalrous 100-year-old vampire, the appallingly dangerous and beautiful Velander, and the long-suffering Terikel, as they investigate a sort of magical Manhattan Project which threatens to fall into the wrong hands. Sean McMullen is one of the rare ones who can combine high technology, daring visions of future societies, and strong characters into first-rate science fiction. Similar books by other authors. Scattered Suns ( Saga of Seven Suns, book 4) Kevin J Anderson. Eternity's Mind ( Saga of Shadows, book 3) Kevin J Anderson. The Death of Dulgath ( Riyria Chronicles, book 3) Michael J Sullivan.

Glass Dragons continues the tale of Laron, the chivalrous 700-year-old vampire, the appallingly dangerous and beautiful Velander, and the long-suffering Terikel, as they investigate a secret project of arcane magic, a magic so dangerous it could destroy their world. A project which threatens to fall into the wrong hands. Glass Dragons is a broad and complicated tale, filled with wonderful characters both new and old, woven through with low humor and great courage, built upon grand acts of heroism and love. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights.

Sean McMullen's Moonworlds Saga is set on Verral, where inhabitants harness the world's radiation and energy fields and use them as magic  . The Moonworlds Saga (Volume 1) Sean McMullen Tor/Forge.

A broad and complicated novel filled with wonderful characters, woven through with low humor and great courage, and built upon grand acts of heroism and love. It is the tale of Laron, the chivalrous 700-year-old vampire, the appallingly dangerous and beautiful Velander, and the long-suffering Terikel, as they investigate a secret project of arcane magic, a magic so dangerous it could destroy their world . . .
Reviews: 7
Auridora
Seller advertised the book's description accurately. He also shipped the book
well protected so that it arrived undamaged and in a timely manner. I would
recommend this seller and will seek to make further purchases from him.
This Sean Mullen is turning out to be very interesting science fiction.
I would recommend this series. Very enjoyable.
Cheber
The Moonworlds Saga was written with crisp Australian humor which improves with each book. Each could stand on it's own story line, but the series takes you on a fast-paced tour full of adventure and humor. I would like to see it as a movie.
Getaianne
The sequel to the Voyage of the Shadowmoon, The Glass Dragon again unites the main casts to confront a new danger that might again destroy the world.
If the ending to The Voyage of the Shadowmoon, left you with a warm fuzzy feeling, my advice to you is to treasure that moment and avoid this book. The main issue I had throughout The Glass Dragon was a lack of a definitive antagonist. With Shadowmoon, there were active characters who were intent on using Silvedeath to gain power (Warsovran, Feran, etc). The Dragonwall is a danger that is similar to Silverdeath in that it's a weapon of doomsday potential that is available to anybody. However, unlike the pursuers of Silverdeath, the Dragonwall's "people" were all annonymous who might or might not have used it for their selfish purposes once they realized it's true potential. Also, about 30% of the story was actually devoted to Dragonwall. The majority of the book was focused on the Rosencrantz and Guildenstern-like antics of Andry and Wallas, who go from place to place with no rhyme or reason with little or no relation to the overall plot. Personally, I thought the book would have benefited if the story focused solely on the antics of these two instead of confusing the overall flow of the story with intermittent scenes about the Dragonwall. In all honesty, if it wasn't for the Terry Pratchett-like humor and dialogue I probably would have given this book a lesser rating.
Asher
The second book in a fantasy series by the imaginative and fairly funny Sean McmMullen. Set in a parallel world with somewhat different kinds of humans and magic as a form of technology. This is a better book than the first book in the series, Voyage of the Shadowmoon. Glass Dragons has a more focused plot, a smaller cast of characters, and more dramatic integrity than Voyage of the Shadowmoon. Most of the characters are carryovers from the first book and a limitation of this book is that it is more enjoyable if you've slogged through the first book. It also has a similar theme to the first book. A large scale and destructive magical device is created and the book is about efforts to destroy it. This is McMullen's recurrent theme, the dangers of attempting large scale manipulation of the natural world, which appears in this series and also in a slightly different way in his prior Greatwinter trilogy. Despite the joky tone of his writing, it appears that McMullen is producing books that are, in part, allegorical commentaries on the dangers of modern attempts to control the natural world.
Sharpmane
Glass Dragons is Sean McMullen's direct sequel to Voyage of the Shadowmoon. Like the previous book, it is set on a fantasy world, the moon of a large planet, inhabited by people who seem very human though turn out (with one exception) not to be: they have double hearts, for instance. In the first book, an entire continent is destroyed by a terrible weapon, which is only destroyed by the heroic efforts of a large contingent of characters -- some of whom end up not quite so heroic by the end. I had complained in my review that the characters are a bit hard to keep track of, that too many of them turn out to be nobles or royals in disguise, and that I wasn't sure their characters were consistently maintained.

This new book once again features a terrible weapon, and a quest to destroy it. Once again a large contingent of not always very heroic characters joins somewhat haphazardly in the effort. It is noticeable, though, that the characters are not this time all nobles or royals in disguise. I also think that they maintain their characters more consistently -- but I still think McMullen's view of his characters tends to be excessively cynical -- and I really have a hard time believing so consistently in a such a parade of mostly nasty folk. BUT -- I did enjoy the book, on the whole.

I should add that, even though the book is a direct sequel to Voyage of the Shadowmoon, there is no need to read that book in order to enjoy the new one.

A group of wizards establish something called Dragonwall, ostensibly to control the Torean storms, storms caused by the heat engendered in the destruction of the continent of Torea in the previous book. But Dragonwall makes a great deal of power available to any wizard who knows how to tap it. And you know what power does, right? The eventual group who quest to destroy Dragonwall include a few characters from the last book -- mainly Laron, the hundreds of years old vampire who is no longer a vampire; Velander, who became a vampire in the last book and who has a drinking problem -- caused by sucking the blood of too many drunks; and Terikel, who in her twisted self can never love anyone -- but she does hold the key to destroying Dragonwall. There are also some new characters, for example the incompetent Master of Royal Music to the Emperor of Sargol, one Wallas, who is implicated in the assassination of the Emperor when the actual assassin assumes Wallas's form to do the deed. Wallis finds himself partnered with Andry, a low born sailor/carpenter who wants to be a gentleman, and who appears to have the inner nature to be more gentlemanly than anyone. There are plenty further characters: students, dragons, princesses, monks, etc.

The plot is rambling, full of incident, pretty fun on the whole. It's not a great book by any means but it's an enjoyable and imaginative long fantasy.