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ISBN:0140450173
Author: George Bernard Shaw
ISBN13: 978-0140450170
Title: Heartbreak House: A Fantasia in the Russian Manner on English Themes (Shaw Library)
Format: lrf mbr mobi doc
ePUB size: 1256 kb
FB2 size: 1595 kb
DJVU size: 1750 kb
Language: English
Category: Dramas and Plays
Publisher: Penguin Books (February 7, 1988)
Pages: 160

Heartbreak House: A Fantasia in the Russian Manner on English Themes (Shaw Library) by George Bernard Shaw



September 15, 2007, BiblioBazaar. Paperback in English. Libraries near you: WorldCat. January 30, 1997, Audio Book Contractors.

A Fantasia in the Russian Manner on English Themes. Last updated Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 14:22. eBooksaide The University of Adelaide Library University of Adelaide South Australia 5005. A Russian playwright, Tchekov, had produced four fascinating dramatic studies of Heartbreak House, of which three, The Cherry Orchard, Uncle Vanya, and The Seagull, had been performed in England. Tolstoy, in his Fruits of Enlightenment, had shown us through it in his most ferociously contemptuous manner.

Heartbreak house: a fantasia in the russian manner on english themes. Heartbreak house and horseback hall. In the prophetic works of Charles Dickens we were warned against many evils which have since come to pass; but of the evil of being slaughtered by a foreign foe on our own doorsteps there was no shadow. But when she struck at last she struck with a vengeance.

Title: Heartbreak House. Author: George Bernard Shaw. Release Date: January 13, 2009 Last Updated: December 10, 2012. Produced by Eve Sobol, and David Widger. A fantasia in the russian manner on english themes. Exiles from the library, the music room, and the picture gallery would be found languishing among the stables, miserably discontented; and hardy horsewomen who slept at the first chord of Schumann were born, horribly misplaced, into the garden of Klingsor; but sometimes one came upon horsebreakers and heartbreakers who could make the best of both worlds. As a rule, however, the two were apart and knew little of one another; so the prime minister folk had to choose between barbarism and Capua. And of the two atmospheres it is hard to say which was the more fatal to statesmanship.

This vintage book contains George Bernard Shaw’s 1919 play, "Heartbreak House: A Fantasia in the Russian Manner on English Themes". Ellie Dunn, her father, and her fiancé attend one of Hesione Hushabye’s notorious dinner parties. However, Ellie’s partner is a rake, her father is an idiot, and she has amorous feelings for Hesione’s husband. It is an adventurous farrago of comedy, tragedy, and satire that can only lead to disaster. George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950) was an Irish playwright who co-founded the London School of Economics

A fantasia in the russian manner on english themes.

by George Bernard Shaw (Author). Ironically, I detest Shaw, and having read a good bloc of his plays and mini-book prefaces to his plays, I detest his plays in general. Shaw's dramatic characters are invariably one dimensional megaphones, put on stage to popularize either his own idiosyncratic ideas, or-this in his prefaces-to trumpet his own peerless genius in coming up with these ideas. Bernard Shaw is a great playwright. In this particular play he exposes the shortcomings of English upper classes. They only think of mariage, business, politics, but England is in fact a drunken skipper, a skipper on which every sailor and even the captain are drunk with rum and unable to see the danger coming up and to deal with it. So the skipper is condemned to break on the rocks.

By (author) George Bernard Shaw. Free delivery worldwide.

Written at the height of the first World War in Europe, an impassioned satire of the late nineteenth and early twentieth-century bourgeoisie offers a scathing portrait of a household of independent eccentrics
Reviews: 7
Thordigda
Ironically, I detest Shaw, and having read a good bloc of his plays and mini-book prefaces to his plays, I detest his plays in general. Shaw's dramatic characters are invariably one dimensional megaphones, put on stage to popularize either his own idiosyncratic ideas, or-this in his prefaces-to trumpet his own peerless genius in coming up with these ideas. His opinion of mankind in general is barely, if at all, charitable, his being thoroughly convinced that the ignorant masses are and have been manipulated and treated as a potter would wet clay by their opportunistic, soulless elite, be they kings, democratic politicos, professors, clergymen, or big businessmen, since the beginning of time. His opinions and purported sparks of polemical genius can usually be narrated in one quarter the number of words it takes to write them out, and are obviously intended to point to his own writing-creative genius. He reviled Shakespeare (who he always managed to misspell) out of sheer envy; he desired to occupy the top spot of English/Western world drama that was unfortunately already occupied by the Bard of Avon. He admired Stalin, Mussolini and Hitler as needed correctives to the sad, feckless world of post-World War I Western democracy and capitalism. And, by 1940, he had written himself out, in plays at least, and with a decade more of life in him, he had few more ideas to peddle an increasingly alien world, no longer-if ever-hanging on his every too-well enunciated syllable. All this being said, however, the Penguin Classics edition of "Heartbreak House" is a splendid, and a very affordable buy for anyone curious about the drama and polemical prose of this man. The well-written introduction by David Hare makes splendid reading, and argues almost convincingly for Shaw's still-active relevance in the world of ideas and of the stage. If you want to defeat an enemy, or someone whose ideas you revile, you must get to know him through and through, and this necessity is well satisfied by this Penguin Classics edition of this play, along with their full line of Shaw's not at all timeless dramatic productions.
Meztihn
Heartbreak House by George Bernard Shaw. Published by MobileReference (mobi).

This is a fascinating, fast-paced comedy with dark undertones about a bankrupt society. It is set in the late nineteenth - early twentieth century, but the issues turn out to be very contemporary: the question of capitalism, security vs. adventure, gender roles. I recommend it!
Beazerdred
Merely a warning about the Dover Thrift Edition of "Heartbreak House": Practically every page has omitted apostrophes and/or added spaces wit hin wor ds. For me, it quickly became tiresome.

(Of course it's possible - though unlikely - that I just got a bad copy from a one-time printing glitch. Your call.)
Cetnan
Bernard Shaw is a great playwright. In this particular play he exposes the shortcomings of English upper classes. They only think of mariage, business, politics, but England is in fact a drunken skipper, a skipper on which every sailor and even the captain are drunk with rum and unable to see the danger coming up and to deal with it. So the skipper is condemned to break on the rocks. England in the same way is condemned to break on the rocks because no one, in the upper classes, thinks beyond their interest. This catastrophe coming up is shown by some kind of supernatural explosion at the end of the play and the members of these upper classes admire the event as being beautiful and they are totally unable to cope. The picture given by Shaw of England is particularly pessimistic. Their is no future and no hope for that country. Along the way he discusses important issues such as the liberation of women within their enslavement and their power is nothing but hypnotism or drowning men in a sea of words and charm. The only sane man in the play is the captain, with an allusion to Whitman, « Captain my captain », who sees the catastrophes coming and is unable to convince his own daughters or their husbands and friends that they have to control the boat if they don't want it to capsize. But does he really want to convince them ?
Dr Jacques COULARDEAU