Download English Music epub book
ISBN:0345376137
Author: Peter Ackroyd
ISBN13: 978-0345376138
Title: English Music
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ePUB size: 1756 kb
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Language: English
Category: Deliver toandnbsp;Russian Federation
Publisher: Ballantine Books (June 14, 1994)

English Music by Peter Ackroyd



All the while Peter Ackroyd presents a series of digressions involving famous individuals from English literature, music, and art, depicted in dream sequences that otherwise relate to Timothy's unique nature, what he doesn't realize and never fully comprehends as being a more authentic version of the life his father has led.

English Music is the sixth novel by Peter Ackroyd. As with all Ackroyd's previous novels, it focuses on London, although on this occasion partly as a backdrop for English culture in general.

1992) A novel by Peter Ackroyd. With alternating chapters set in the late 1920s and in a dream world involving Byrd, Constable and Carroll, the novel charts the development of a motherless young man. The author also wrote "Chatterton" and "Hawksmoor".

English Music is a tour de force of imagination and evocation - a startling, masterful novel from one of the most exciting writers at work today. There is something about English Music that stops it from being the great book it wants to be. There are many positives. The story of the life of Timothy Holcomb that binds the book is a good one. Peter Ackroyd was born in London in 1949. He graduated from Cambridge University and was a Fellow at Yale (1971-1973). A critically acclaimed and versatile writer, Ackroyd began his career while at Yale, publishing two volumes of poetry. He continued writing poetry until he began delving into historical fiction with The Great Fire of London (1982). A constant theme in Ackroyd's work is the blending of past, present, and future, often paralleling the two in his biographies and novels.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A boy escapes from the harsh realities of post-World War I London into the evocative world of his imagination. Sometimes Ackroyd will hit upon a truism of staggering banality, such as 'even in childhood, it is possible to entertain two opposite sides of consciousness at the same time. What is the reader to do with this - underline it? Mark, note and inwardly digest it?

Mish-mash of gifted prose looking back, and ahead?? By Thriftbooks. com User, July 26, 1998. Existential foray into fatherson relationship, exploring the richness of the traditions in English art, music and literature in the process. The chapters alternate between fantasy and reality, and it is sometimes hard to evauluate which is which, as the main character

Critical Survey of Contemporary Fiction). document PDF. This Page Only.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove English music from your list? English music. Published 1993 by Penguin in London.

Peter Ackroyd: English Music. This is, in my opinion, Ackroyd’s masterpiece to date. Only this novel and First Light of the novels to date are set away from London, though even this one starts off in London. Incidentally, if you are looking for this book, I have seen it, on several occasions, classified in a bookstore under Music rather than Fiction or Literature but then if booksellers knew what they were doing, there would not be any need for this site, would there? And, of course, it is out of print both in Britain and the USA.

A boy escapes from the harsh realities of post-World War I London into the evocative world of his imagination, where a discovery of his heritage offers him the key to understanding his own past. 25,000 first printing. $25,000 ad/promo. Tour.
Reviews: 3
Nuadador
Peter Ackroyd, English Music
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I couldn't get through Hawksmoor or Chatterton, but found Ackroyd's Dickens superb. Of course as a Londoner who is obsessed by Dickens, Ackroyd is to some extent pre-programmed. The same themes keep coming up - mystery,nightwalking, dreams, nightmares, spiritualism etc, but always with a new slant. He's certainly an acquired taste and those who love him will love him. Not sure I could ever be one of their number.

However, I picked up English Music at a charity stall a few weeks ago, and remembering the reviews from way back - and particularly a ferociously panning one by Peter Kemp on Radio 3 - I determined to be fair to the man and give it a go. The verdict? Well, as always with Ackroyd's novels, I was fascinated at the beginning, charmed along the way but not exactly panting to get to the end of the road 400 pages later.

English Music is, as Ackroyd addicts would expect, 'a literary novel,' meaning one written in elegant prose and not produced to formula. It aims above all and like all such literary novels to reveal the consciouness of a central character. Ackroyd, however, unlike, say, Henry James, is quirky and bizarre, mixing genres - farce, melodrama, philosophical ramblings, sermon and pastiche with straight narrative that tells a story. English Music recalled for me a totally different kind of fictional mish-mash - Melville's Moby Dick. Each new chapter seems to embark on a fresh track, often dipping into our (i.e. English) literary heritage, to show the reader how much life is a dream, a recurring fiction whose forms change but whose message is always the same - that life is a dream etc. For Eng Lit students this is often quite fun, but for the common reader - well, he or she will probably agree with Peter Kemp that enough is enough and too much is way too much.

However, I'm a lit crit waller and hence found a certain fascination in having Alice, Miss Havisham, Robinson Crusoe, Defoe himself, Purcell, Byrd, and even Friday (a dog in this case) as my companions as I wandered with Tim (surely a reincarnation of Tiny Tim) to try to find his spiritual (and spiritualist) father (Yes, Joyce is never far away) amongst English Literature and English music.

So the story's no good but what about the elegant prose, then, and the 'philosophy'? Sometimes Ackroyd will hit upon a truism of staggering banality, such as 'even in childhood, it is possible to entertain two opposite sides of consciousness at the same time.' What is the reader to do with this - underline it? Mark, note and inwardly digest it? We are treated to such gems of wisdom throughout the 'story.' The themes are banged home: The Eternal Return. Son seeking Father. Language flowing like music, like ideas, like life. Spirits merely inhabit bodies for a time and other neo-Platonic fantasies. Here characters pop out of fiction at the drop of a hat; they have walk-on parts in Tim's fantasies, are archetypes or prototypes. With Tim (and Time - yes, Ackroyd is not above the obvious pun) we are conducted through the streets of London, where every man is a child and every body a walking spirit. Someone has read too much Dickens. Me, I prefer Dickens.
Browelali
Not what I expected but Peter Ackroyd is still one of mky favor.ite authors
Very Old Chap
Existential foray into fatherson relationship, exploring the richness of the traditions in English art, music and literature in the process. The father, a former circus magician entertainer, uses the son's latent psychic abilities to get in touch with other people's pain in order to become a healer. The chapters alternate between fantasy and reality, and it is sometimes hard to evauluate which is which, as the main character, Timothy, romps around with a host of imaginary literary figures and real life misfits. Is Ackroyd making a sly commentary here about his predecessors or merely weaving the web of his current story? The effect is to relive some of your exposure to the classics, rechanneling Alice in Wonderland, Robinson Crueso, and Dickens (to name a few of the references) into a new scenario of discomfort. The enjoyment of this book, in the final estimate, is in entering into strange dreamlands of childhood hopes. Timothy hears the music, but he can't explai! n it. Does this failure ultimately signify that we are on the verge of composing a new song? In the end, Timothy settles for the simplicity of birdsong, leaving the discipline of continued searching for us, if we choose to make the journey onward. The spirituality in this novel is undeniable, but one can't put a finger on it. God with us, not God over and above or beyond us, may be the proposition.