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ISBN:0708990592
Author: Anita Brookner
ISBN13: 978-0708990599
Title: Falling Slowly (Charnwood Library)
Format: azw lrf mbr lrf
ePUB size: 1943 kb
FB2 size: 1953 kb
DJVU size: 1512 kb
Language: English
Category: Contemporary
Publisher: Charnwood (Large Print); Large Print Ed edition (February 1, 1999)
Pages: 304

Falling Slowly (Charnwood Library) by Anita Brookner



Library of Congress Control Number: 98012964. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0375704248 (pb. System Control Number: (Sirsi) 9007036. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Falling slowly : a novel, Anita Brookner.

Falling Slowly – Anita Brookner. February 6, 2009 by heavenali. SynopsisBeatrice and Miriam are sisters, sharing little except an unhappy childhood. This novel about two sisters leading quiet lives, is typical of the other Brookner novels I have read; There is a feeling of solitude and disappointment in these characters, who are middle aged, intelligent women, with only few other acquaintances. The sisters inability to talk to one another leads them to more solitude, like so many people each of them dosen’t really appreciate the other. As with other Brookner novels I have read, this is written beautifully, and is poignantly touching

In Falling Slowly, Anita Brookner brilliantly evokes the origins, nature, and consequences of human isolation. As middle age settles upon the Sharpe sisters.

About book: In Falling Slowly, Anita Brookner brilliantly evokes the origins, nature, and consequences of human isolation. As middle age settles upon the Sharpe sisters, regret over chances not taken casts a shadow over their contented existence. Beatrice, a talented if uninspired pianist, gives up performing, a decision motivated by stiffening joints and the sudden realization that her art has never brought her someone to love.

The brilliant Anita Brookner, praised by The New York Times as "one of the finest novelists of her generation," now gives us a stunning story of two sisters and the strange patterns of identity and love. The Sharpe sisters have lived a careful and contemplative existence. Miriam is a translator of French texts and Beatrice a moderately successful pianist. Falling Slowly - Anita Brookner.

Anita Brookner has no illusions about desire-or illusion-yet she is well aware of their unrelenting power. Beautifully written and extremely depressing. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 17 years ago. I once bumped into Anita Brookner at a museum exhibition in London. She looked fiercely intelligent, exactly like her photograph in Falling Slowly, and she gave me the odd impression that there was a zone surrounding her, a wall, if you will, of privacy. I instinctively stepped back to give her that space. Was this my imagination, this wall? Or had I read too many Anita Brookner novels and identified her too closely with her protagonists? I don't know.

In Falling Slowly, Anita Brookner brilliantly evokes the origins, nature, and consequences of human isolation. Beatrice, a talented if uninspired pianist, gives up performing, a decision motivated by stiffening joints and the sudden realization that h In Falling Slowly, Anita Brookner brilliantly evokes the origins, nature, and consequences of human isolation. She spends her quiet days in the library, "peacefully translating contemporary novels of no particular merit into English. Brookner is equally astute when describing the three male characters who pass unattached through the sisters' lives.

Falling slowly : a novel. Publication date 1998. Identifier-ark ark:/13960/t45q5ss7s.

Diversity Collections. Few contemporary writers are as fascinated as Brookner by the complex relations of siblings, and none can match her vigor or originality in excavating family histories. The faded gentility of Miriam and Beatrice’s family life, and the unquestioned assumption of their parents that a woman can be fulfilled only by marriage (an assumption the sisters both resist and embrace), are artfully conveyed.

The brilliant Anita Brookner, praised by The New York Times as "one of the finest novelists of her generation," now gives us a stunning story of two sisters and the strange patterns of identity and love.        The Sharpe sisters have lived a careful and contemplative existence. Miriam is a translator of French texts and Beatrice a moderately successful pianist. Their lives of quiet sophistication are suddenly interrupted by several complicated men: Max, Beatrice's agent; Simon, a handsome and charming married man; and Tom Rivers, a journalist who befriends Miriam. These men create disorder in the Sharpe sisters' controlled lives as Miriam, the unromantic stoic of the two, begins an affair and Beatrice's career undergoes an unexpected change.         The exquisite writing, affecting characters, and astonishing psychological perceptions for which Anita Brookner is famous are evident on every page of this beautiful novel by a modern master.
Reviews: 7
Whitebinder
All her books are about women who struggle with being suppressed and unable to authentically and simply say something throughout life, whatever the various circumstances are of each heroine. But her prose is to die for.
Voodoogore
As usual, beautiful writing about the internal minutiae of a woman's life in relation to daily happenings. Not for everyone, but always a sense of place is established, the writing is beautifully satisfying, the woman's thoughts though often bleak and pessimistic inspire droll humour & even delight in the reader, & are ultimately moving. I love Anita"s writing, & her signature interests in loneliness and how it is dealt with are fully illustrated in this book.
Daron
I had extreme difficulty getting into this book. It took several false starts to get going. I make a point of always reading enough to give a fair trial to a book, but I had a tough time getting past the first few pages. Once I finally did get going, I found that while the plot was adequately interesting, the writing itself was fairly flat and uninspiring. I was glad to finish it, and will not likely read it again. I don't believe that books automatically qualify as clever or brilliant simply because they are dull and depressing. If this book aspires to be just that (clever or brilliant), it falls far short of the mark.
Adoraris
I once bumped into Anita Brookner at a museum exhibition in London. She looked fiercely intelligent, exactly like her photograph in Falling Slowly, and she gave me the odd impression that there was a zone surrounding her, a wall, if you will, of privacy. I instinctively stepped back to give her that space. Was this my imagination, this wall? Or had I read too many Anita Brookner novels and identified her too closely with her protagonists? I don't know. But I have read a number of Brookner novels, and, while enjoying her fine, nuanced writing, I have always wanted to get out and interact with others after I have finished one of her books. Her characters are so isolated, so lonely, so trapped in worlds of their own making, never seeming to get anywhere, going round and round in circles of carefully-controlled routine. Dismaying, and ultimately depressing. In this book, two sisters, Beatrice and Miriam Sharpe, who grew up in a cold home, with parents who were unhappily married, go through the motions of living. Beatrice is a concert pianist manque who ended up in a dead-end job as an accompanist. Miriam translates French novels into English (or vice-versa---it's not clear), a solitary occupation that she conducts at home and at the London Library. Beatrice, a romantic, never gets the romance in real-life that she finds in romance novels. Miriam's 5-year marriage to a scientist ends when he leaves for Canada with his lab assistant. Miriam could care less. She moves in with her sister, and then back out, but they wind up together at the end, not particularly happy in each other's company, but not particularly happy in anyone else's company, either. Even Miriam's affair with Simon, a too-handsome married man, a classic womanizer, is not very much fun. Is there sexual fulfillment? Brookner barely goes into that. Another man, Tom Rivers (a play on the Rivers character in Jane Eyre), might be just what Miriam needs after Simon dumps her, but he is abruptly removed from the scene. Several reviews indicate that the book ends on a positive note. That needs qualification---what's positive for a character in a Brookner novel doesn't pass for positive in many other places. Yes, Miriam, after Beatrice's death, seems to be interacting a bit more with other people, but not so that anyone with a richer social and emotional life would recognize. While I respect Brookner's writing skill, I would recommend Falling Slowly only to die-hard fans.
Kamick
...who are over 25, until we reach terminal velocity, as it were, for life's inevitable denouement? The title is a transparent metaphor for life, and is derived from listening to the radio for the "shipping forecast," which Americans would translate into the weather report. The report normally concludes with the weather at Mallin Head, and it is the barometric pressure that is "falling slowly."

Brookner is not for the "fun read" crowd, nor those who want their heroine to conquer all in the end. And alas, a number of critical reviews seem to be from readers hoping for same. No, Anita Brookner writes with acute and painful realism about the human dilemma, and frequently addresses that slice of humanity that are middle age, middle income Englishwomen who are making accommodations for their fate in life.

The novel is essentially the story of two sisters, Beatrice and Miriam. Beatrice is the older; maintained romantic hopes throughout her life; and we learn early in the novel, dies in her `50's. Miriam is the more realistic younger sister who has taken care of her, to some extent, during Beatrice's period of decline. Each has had affairs and relationships with men. Brookner carefully delineates the operative parameters in the affairs, no doubt as women tend to, almost certainly more carefully than men. Meanwhile, the men are the minor characters, well-drawn, for sure, but still a backdrop. In the middle portion of the book Brookner presents alternating chapters in the lives of the two, before bringing them together towards the end.

Concerning the "backdrop," the portraits of Max Gruber, who had once been an ugly "ladies man," and had once been Beatrice's boss, as well as Max's replacement, Simon Haggard, rang painfully authentic. The only character who did not ring authentic was the TOO accommodating journalist, Tom Rivers. I particularly liked the scene in which Miriam is imagining the scene of Simon, with family, in Verbier, on Christmas and what she does about it. Like the "shipping forecast," Henry James is woven into the novel in several places; no doubt for his character portrayals, of which I consider Brookner his equal.

I like Brookner's style of writing a fairly straightforward sentence, and then adding three, four, five modifying clauses, as though it were a jewel held to the light, and with each additional clause, the jewel is turned slightly, for greater appreciation and depth of meaning. Her dominant themes are loneliness, solitude and remembrance for those who have finally achieved terminal velocity. Hardly unique themes in literature; perhaps those that contemplate them are the very ones driven to write about them.

Consider some of Brookner's insights: (Concerning the public image of Miriam helping the ill Beatrice): "Women admired them; men were if anything abruptly dismissive, sensing an oppressively sexless world of sacrifice and obligation." (Concerning men and women preparing themselves in the morning): "With a man there was no transition: the naked face and body were quickly transformed into the clothed adult human being, with nothing to hint at frailty, at disguise, at vigilance." (And summing up many a wife's assessment of her husband): "...she could hardly remember the actual corporeal presence of her husband, who seemed to have shrunk to a small compendium of irritating habits..." (Or on the games men and women play): "...she looked back at the radiant pantomimes of affection she had mustered for men who had meant nothing to her." "She would have urged them to enjoy men, as many men as possible, before they became aware, as he was now, of the neutered state that awaited them." (And on the aging process): "Youth, middle age, and `You're looking well'". "All those trim fifty- and sixty-year olds had annoyed him. They'll find out, he thought vengefully, as he allowed himself to be led from the room."

Rich, dense, insightful, as the above quotes indicate. Ms. Brookner packs more original thinking on the human condition in one of her 10-15 page chapters than are in much longer novels. A wonderful, solid, 5-stars.