Download Ironweed epub book
ISBN:0743263065
Author: William Kennedy
ISBN13: 978-0743263061
Title: Ironweed
Format: docx doc mbr mobi
ePUB size: 1798 kb
FB2 size: 1987 kb
DJVU size: 1179 kb
Language: English
Category: Contemporary
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd (September 30, 2004)
Pages: 208

Ironweed by William Kennedy



Ironweed is a 1983 novel by William Kennedy. It received the 1984 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and is the third book in Kennedy's Albany Cycle. It is included in the Western Canon of the critic Harold Bloom. Ironweed is set during the Great Depression and tells the story of Francis Phelan, an alcoholic vagrant originally from Albany, New York, who left his family after accidentally killing his infant son while he may have been drunk

First published in the United States of America by The Viking Press 1983. Published in Penguin Books 1984. This book is for four good men: Bill Segarra, Tom Smith, Harry Staley, and Frank Trippett. Tall Ironweed is a member of the Sunflower Family (Asteraceae). It has a tall erect stem and bears deep purple-blue flower heads in loose terminal clusters. Its leaves are long and thin and pointed, their lower surfaces downy.

Easily the best novel I've read in years. Each book in Kennedy's Albany Trilogy is worth your attention but the final novel, Ironweed, is the tour de force that will leave you at once thoughtful, enriched, and somber. Guess them Pulitzer Prize folks know their game, alright.

The third book in the Albany Cycle series.

Book's title: Ironweed William Kennedy. Library of Congress Control Number: 96034825 //r97. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Ironweed, William Kennedy.

IRONWEED by William J. Kennedy was the latest selection for a book club I've recently joined. The premise of the club is to read a novel and then view the movie (at the group meeting) that was based on the novel. As I expected, the movie paled in comparison to the book, despite the screenplay being written by Kennedy himself. Jack Nicholson plays the main character (Francis) and Meryl Streep is his "wanna be" socialite girlfriend (Helen), but this star power doesn't elevate the story beyond what Kennedy had already done in the novel.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. I'd Rather Fight Than Swish.

Reading this book brought up the same feelings in me, even though there was no possibility of two-way interaction. I did not want to have to see this ugly, desperate part of the world. I did not want to sympathize with a man who killed his own son and slept on a pile of cardboard. But every character is human, and Francis is kind and even generous. Somehow, he is comfortable helping where I would not be. He, whose life makes me want to sidle away, is better than me. This book forces you to confront the humanity within the lives of the destitute.

Reviews: 7
Nenayally
This is not a happy book, but it is a view into the life of homeless people and their sorrows and trouble.
Zorve
Finally, a Pulitzer I enjoyed! The harsh realities for Francis and Helen really puts the reader into their situation, as grim as it is. But yet Francis still maintains a positive attitude, something many could not. Loved the authentic language throughout; it really sold it.
lucky kitten
THIS WAS A FASCINATING LOOK AT DEPRESSION ERA ALBANY - THE CHARACTERS THAT DWELLED THERE. KENNEDY'S WRITING STYLE HAD ME ENGROSSED ALL THROUGHOUT THE BOOK. MERYL STREEP SINGING "HE'S ME PAL" WAS ABSOLUTELY UNFORGETTABLE. (SAW THE MOVIE TOO) I LIKED THIS BOOK SO WELL I BOUGHT TWO OF KENNEDY'S OTHER BOOKS....
FRANK - SAN CLEMENTE, CA
Winotterin
There are so many things happening in this brief novel. This is another book that I have given away over and over, have purchased over and over, and still recommend to anybody who I think might fit the bill of interest. (I still haven't watched the movie...)
Impala Frozen
IRONWEED by William J. Kennedy was the latest selection for a book club I've recently joined. The premise of the club is to read a novel and then view the movie (at the group meeting) that was based on the novel. As I expected, the movie paled in comparison to the book, despite the screenplay being written by Kennedy himself. Jack Nicholson plays the main character (Francis) and Meryl Streep is his "wanna be" socialite girlfriend (Helen), but this star power doesn't elevate the story beyond what Kennedy had already done in the novel.

Set during the "Great Depression," IRONWEED is a great look at the underbelly of society: drunks, homeless, impoverished, and in that regard the story is timeless. I enjoyed the characters' quirkiness and the loosely connected plots, but more significantly to me were the themes of redemption, forgiveness, and love. The love aspect may be hard to spot, but it is there, unconventionally, in many of the character's interactions.

This favorable recommendation comes with a warning: it can be a depressing read, definitely not a happy one, and while I found it inspirational, it will not conjure any blithe emotions. IRONWEED is definitely not a June beach read, being more apropos to a long winter night, indoor, by a warm fire.
Xisyaco
You may have seen the movie. You may feel it evokes Albany, NY. But reading this gave me insight into the mind of my own homeless alcoholic, my younger brother.

Like the protaganist, my brother doesn't have to be homeless. But the requirements of the straight life are just too much.

Why would anyone choose this? How can my brother prefer sleeping outside in the cold, being dirty and hungry? He had a good job, was a homeowner, a husband, is still a father and grandfather.

William Kennedy has given me a clue. I'll never really get it, but Ironweed got me closer.
Quendant
Really got entwined in Fran,s life. Hard at times to know the present,past or future. Take n by old ALbany and familiar names.
I am on a quest to read all novels that have won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. IRONWEED is one of my favorites of the novels I have read so far. One passage from the book continues to speak to me: "If you love something well enough...you will die for it; for when we love with all our might, our silly little selves are already dead and we have no more fear of dying."