Download Hurry on Down epub book
ISBN:0436560607
Author: John Wain
ISBN13: 978-0436560606
Title: Hurry on Down
Format: lrf doc docx mbr
ePUB size: 1838 kb
FB2 size: 1849 kb
DJVU size: 1307 kb
Language: English
Category: Contemporary
Publisher: Martin Secker & Warburg Ltd; First Edition edition (May 15, 1978)
Pages: 241

Hurry on Down by John Wain



Hurry on Down (1953), his first novel, ushered in a new type of English fiction and paved the way for many later classics, including Kingsley Amis’s Lucky Jim (1954) and John Braine’s Room at the Top (1957). John Wain was born in 1925 in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire. He attended St John’s College, Oxford, earning a BA in 1946 and an MA in 1950. A prolific author and man of letters, Wain wrote poetry, novels, criticism, and biographies during a writing career that spanned more than forty years.

A great fund of comic invention  . For the most part, the novel has been lucidly strung together, and save for a slow, wordy beginning it is only once in a while that it loses momentum, showing signs of being the authors first major work.

The e-book makes an intensive study of John Wain as an English novelist in the larger perspective of contemporary period. Let it be remembered at the outset that there are writers like Dryden and Flaubert of whom it can be said that the excitement that generates their work is partly a critical excitement. This is true of John Wain as well. In fact, critical awareness was in his grain, and he was acutely aware of it very early in life. So, Wain's desire to be a 'critical writer' was shadowed when he was twelve or so.

Hurry on Down Short Biography John Barrington Wain was born on 14th March 1925 in Staffordshire England. Wain went to St. John´s College in Oxford. He seems to have married in 1947, since . Lewis wrote a poem for his wedding in June of that year. He was an English novelist, poet and critic associated with the literary group The Movement. John Wain´ s first novel was Hurry on Down in 1953. The idea for the novel can be led back to a very early period. When John Wain was nine, one afternoon he was walking back to school from his grand-parent's house. It was a cold, leaden afternoon, with snow lying in dirty heaps. Some high school boys, six or eight in number, came in sight and were walking slightly to one side of John Wain.

Young Men, although this association is largely misrepresentative of his fiction. There is a certain amount of annoyance with conventional society in Hurry On Down, but this is never given the left-wing political or ideological direction that was assumed by later Angry writers such as Osborne and Sillitoe. The main protagonist, Charles Lumley, has a broadly anti-establishment outlook, eschews identification with any social or political group, and endeavours to pursue an individualistic resistance to all forms of collective activity.

John Wain’s first novel, published in 1953, which has been called the first appearance of the Angry Young Man as hero. Charles Lumley has finished University, which has left him totally unsuited for any job he would want to take, and he has split from the woman he has been in love with since they were at school. He takes on any number of jobs as his whims and circumstances dictate : window cleaner, comedy scriptwriter, delivery driver, hospital porter. Through a picaresque chain of accidents he comes to terms with his own feelings and the girl that he has set his heart on, even.

Hurry on get this book - a splendid read! By Thriftbooks. com User, December 4, 2003. John Wain's literary excellence lies in his simple style of writing. Hurry on Down is a study of disaffected youth in 1950's Britain.

Other articles where Hurry on Down is discussed: John Wain: Hurry On Down (1953) was Wain’s first and, to some critics, best novel. Other contenders would probably be Strike the Father Dead and A Winter in the Hills. Hurry On Down (1953) was Wain’s first and, to some critics, best novel. It follows the adventures of a university graduate valiantly trying to establish some sort of.

John Wain's literary excellence lies in his simple style of writing. This is the world of mugs of tea, Woodbine Cigarettes, rainy streets, fog and smog, a country that appeared to exist in continuous monochrome and the enigmatic pre-decimal coinage, even the book jacket proclaims that it cost "2/6" (two shillings and sixpence). At the centre of the book is Charles Lumley

I think Wain is attempting a full-blooded picaresque, but doesn't really manage to sustain it. He certainly uses all the furniture, including increasingly unlikely co-incidences where old acquaintances keep turning up to to send our hero spinning off in a different direction as he continues his spiral from Middle Class graduate to down-and-out. Charles Lumley is as unattractive character as you could want to meet, his sense of his own superiority to his origins, and his fatuous rejection of them, are nothing to his all-round loathing for everyone fellow beings

"A great fund of comic invention." - "Times Literary Supplement" "Written with great spirit . . . very funny . . . fresh, unhackneyed and excellently observed." - "Listener" "[A] bustling kaleidoscope of a book, by an author fertile in expedient, keenly observant and occasionally probing the heart of darkness." - "Sunday Times" Charles Lumley feels that he has been born in captivity - the captivity of his smugly conventional bourgeois upbringing. Now he has just graduated from university, only to make the discouraging discovery that his education has rendered him unfit for any kind of useful employment. Wondering what to do with the rest of his life and longing to escape, a chance remark overheard in a pub sets him off on a picaresque and hilarious tour of 1950s Britain. He undergoes a string of comic misadventures as he works as a window cleaner, a drug trafficker, a hospital orderly, and a chauffeur, all while trying to find his place in the world and win the love of the beautiful Veronica Roderick. John Wain (1925-1994) was one of the great English men of letters of the 20th century, a prolific novelist, poet, biographer, and critic whose many accolades included the Somerset Maugham Award, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, and the Whitbread Award. "Hurry on Down" (1953), his first novel, ushered in a new kind of English novel and paved the way for many later classics, including Kingsley Amis's "Lucky Jim" (1954) and John Braine's "Room at the Top" (1957). This 60th anniversary edition includes an introduction by Nick Bentley and marks the novel's first republication in the United States in more than half a century.
Reviews: 6
ᵀᴴᴱ ᴼᴿᴵᴳᴵᴻᴬᴸ
John Wain was a member of a generation of British writers after World War II whose work provided some social criticism of the opinions and customs of ordinary Britons. There’s more than one way to do this kind of thing, but these writers usually chose to allow their protagonists to be callous and aggressive. I could tolerate this in a David vs. Goliath conflict, but most of these kinds of stories pitted David against David.

In spite of this and other difficulties, this was a very entertaining and interesting book. The protagonist, Charles Lumley, though not particularly likeable, is someone you can care about because his plight is familiar but not often written about--He doesn’t know what to do with his life. The story that unfolds from there is full of interesting surprises, including a destructive love affair, an ensemble of colorful characters and a variety of jobs.

The setting is urban England after the war and there’s plenty of period detail. I enjoyed Wain’s writing. Here’s an excerpt:

“Among the nameless crimes he had seen hinted at in newspaper reports, or half-heard as a child in whispered conversations among scandalized elders, was one known as Living on Women. The phrase evidently embraced the whole range of possibilities from the full-scale organization of prostitution to the regular accepting of valuable presents from rich old ladies.”

The book is suitable for children, but I doubt they’d like it very much.

2.9 stars
Yar
Perceeding by one year Kingsley Amis' " Lucky Jim" who was a friend, John Wain has written a picaresque novel about the trials and tribulations of an Oxford graduate who is cast into a sea of chance jobs, all of which he is is wildly over qualified for. Each new job leads to a new encounter as Charles Lumley pursues the only thing he really wants Veronica Roderick. This novel comically lampoons the the English social climate and attitudes with incision and charm and like Amis, Mr. Wain has a gift for isolating singular images to make his point. Delightful and depressing.
BlackBerry
good..
Dead Samurai
I read this in the late 50s and it was an opening into a world and a time I felt existed somewhere but at 17 hadn't the wherewithal to locate. It was the dreary world of Post World War 2 in England that spawned Philip Larkin, Kingsley Amis (Lucky Jim) and a host of other likable, humorous writers who recorded their struggles in that dreary time. Something similarly hollow was going on in the U S. The Brits were labeled 'The Angry Young Men' perhaps as a marketing ploy to link them with 'The Beat Generation' soon to rise in America. But I didn't find them angry but funny and irreverent. This novel is a picaresque tale of a fellow's adventures as he tries to make something of the nothing that's been given him. He is as endearing and unluckily erstwhile as Lucky Jim. It provided a pattern of experiences and adventures that I identified with. Scenes from it have stayed with me for fifty years. He followed this with 'Living in the Present' which I also enjoyed.
Adaly
John Wain's literary excellence lies in his simple style of writing. Hurry on Down is a study of disaffected youth in 1950's Britain. This Briain is smokey and industrial and everyone is earning a wage. This is the world of mugs of tea, Woodbine Cigarettes, rainy streets, fog and smog, a country that appeared to exist in continuous monochrome and the enigmatic pre-decimal coinage, even the book jacket proclaims that it cost "2/6" (two shillings and sixpence).
At the centre of the book is Charles Lumley. Given that the book was written in 1953, Wain had become part of the tradition that had spawned fifties Anti-Heroes (Look back in Anger and Rebel without a cause). Lumley's first act of rebellion is to forego his university education and become a window cleaner.
Consider these passages:-
"In Charles's breast pocket was a paper packet containing his last cigarette. He took it out carefully, but it had somehow bent , and the paper was broken in the middle. He began to smoke it, holding it so that one finger exactly covered the torn spot, inhaling deeply. The hot storm-centre of alcohol in his stomach rose to meet the smouldering pool of nicotine in his lungs, and, the burden of guilt and fatigue slipping from his shoulders, he breathed a silent prayer of gratitude to the twin deities of his world"
"The words crashed into the silence by the sudden cessation in Blearney's voice. The effect was that of a man talking loudly in a tube train, who barks out at the end of his sentence as soon as the tube stops, and the whole carriage hears it"
"...Now we can really beginthe fun - the party's complete. Folks, this is Harry Lumpy...This is Jimmy, Stanley and Elsa" The succession of names flooded over his mind like dirty water..."
Dagdardana
This book starts out hilariously with interesting characters and situations. Then there's a series of episodes that are only saved by the chance encounters with former acquaintances.
The end is like the beginning, funny, engaging . . . I just wonder where the middle came from, why it needed to be there.
All in all, well worth the read, likeable protagonist . . .