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ISBN:0747238049
Author: Kay Nolte Smith
ISBN13: 978-0747238041
Title: Tale of the Wind (Spanish Edition)
Format: mbr lrf lit rtf
ePUB size: 1851 kb
FB2 size: 1357 kb
DJVU size: 1510 kb
Language: Spanish
Category: Contemporary
Publisher: Headline Book Publishing (May 7, 1992)
Pages: 608

Tale of the Wind (Spanish Edition) by Kay Nolte Smith



A Tale of the Wind book. Spanning nearly a century-from the birth of Romanticism to the. And even the historical setting in this, quite significant, was not quite my cup of tea, especially compared to some of the others

Kay Nolte Smith, the author of "The Watcher" and other mystery novels, died on Saturday at Monmouth Medical Center in Long Branch, . She was 61 and lived in Tinton Falls, . The cause was lung cancer, said her sister, Judith Nolte Heimer of Manhattan. Ms. Smith was born in Eveleth, Minn. and grew up in Baraboo, Wis. In 1952 she earned a bachelor's degree in the liberal arts at the University of Minnesota. She was awarded a master's degree in speech and theater at the University of Utah in 1955. Her other novels included "Country of the Heart," "Elegy for a Soprano," "Mindspell," "A Tale of the Wind" and "Venetian Song," to be published next year by Villard Books. In addition to her sister, she is survived by her husband, Phillip J. Smith; her father, Clifford Nolte of St. Louis, and a brother, Douglas, of St. Louis. October 1, 1993, Page 00008 The New York Times Archives.

Looking for books by Kay Nolte Smith? See all books authored by Kay Nolte Smith, including Pleasing God, and Catching Fire, and more on ThriftBooks. Books by Kay Nolte Smith. Pleasing God. by Kay Nolte Smith. Publisher: Calvary Chapel Resources. A Tale of the Wind: A Novel of 19Th-Century France.

Kay Nolte Smith (July 4, 1932 – September 25, 1993) was an American writer Smith was born in Eveleth, Minnesota and grew up in Baraboo, Wisconsin. Smith launched her literary career after her separation from the Ayn Rand circle. Her first novel was the mystery story The Watcher. A Tale of the Wind (1991) - nominated for 1992 Prometheus Award in Best Novel category. Venetian Song (1994). Translations Essays. Truth or the Consequences" in Women without Superstition: No Gods, No Masters.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. A Tale of the wind : a novel of 19th century France by Kay Nolte Smith. Book's title: A Tale of the wind : a novel of 19th century France by Kay Nolte Smith. Library of Congress Control Number

Kay Nolte Smith (1932-1993) was an American writer. She was for a time friendly with the Ayn Rand, who was her leading literary and philosophical influence. Her novel Elegy for a Soprano is a roman a clef inspired by Rand, Nathaniel Branden, and the circle around them. Elegy for a Soprano also portrays the life of Jewish Holocaust survivors from Czechoslovakia and Norway.

Kay Nolte Smith - the complete book list. View on the Mobile Site. This is a historical novel that takes place in 19th-century Paris. Nandou, a talented actor, magician, and dwarf, falls in love with Jeanne Sorel, a ragpicker. He takes her home and educates her, never telling her of his feelings Country of the Heart.

Kay Nolte Smith (July 4, 1932 – September 25, 1993) was an American novelist, essayist, and translator Smith was born in Eveleth, Minnesota and grew up in Baraboo, Wisconsin. She published seven novels before her death from cancer at age 61. Contents.

Kay Nolte Smith was an American writer. also known as K. Nolte Smith. born on 4 July 1932 (83 years ago) in Eveleth. nationality: United States of America. nominated to Prometheus Award for Best Novel - "A Tale of the Wind". Online dictionaries and encyclopedias with entries for Kay Nolte Smith (novelist). Go to the wordplay of Kay Nolte Smith for some fun with words!

Kay Nolte Smith (1932-1993) was an American actress and writer who began as part of Ayn Rand's inner circle and subsequently published a number of novels, one of which - Elegy for a Soprano - was widely considered a critical take on Rand's personality and devoted inner circle of admirers. Elegy for a Soprano (1985). Country of the Heart (1987). A Tale of the Wind (1991). Edmond Eugène Alexis Rostand (April 1, 1868 - December 2, 1918), French poet and dramatist. The art and science of Kay Nolte Smith, Novelist by Greg Swann.

A love story set in nineteenth century Paris.
Reviews: 7
artman
Thoroughly researched and incredibly rich characters. This is literature in the tradition of Victor Hugo.
Banal
I looked a long time for this book and finally found it through Amazon (should have looked here first). Kay Nolte Smith brought Paris a live for me and I am a Francophone to the hilt!
Kit
First off, I have to admit that I didn't read the entire book. I set it down, determined not to finish it several times but pushed myself through half of it before I finally gave up.
The three main problems I had with this book were these:

1) The style of writing: It's not that I simply didn't prefer the style, it was simply amateurish. While I admire Smith's obvious exstensive study of the history of the time, everything was so melodramatic it was almost embarrasing. The sun couldn't just rise, it had to bleed onto the horizon. The cat couldn't just jump off the windowsill, he had to alight on the floor with the agility and grace of a ballerina. It's tiresome and seems very much like the author ran to the thesaraus after every verb to find something obscure and dramatic.

2) The characters: They are wildly unbelievable and suspicously similar. Nadou, Edimee and Nicolas could only be distinguished by their discriptions. Each of them always says the right thing, are almost always calm until they break open with passion momentarily, and are often making "profound" remarks that thoroughly amaze the other characters in the book (apartently to make up for the certain lack of amazment the reader will feel after one such soliliquy). Jeanne, Gabrielle and Lois could also be easily interchanged. They are all passionate, blunt, stubborn, proud and deal with these emotions in much the same manners. With the dozens of characters Smith shuffles us through, I was suprised at how either similar or cliche they each were... couldn't anyone be shy? Or humorous? Or goofy? Or at least not so annoyingly dramatic? It is also quite a suspension of belief that Nadou and Jeanne could become so VERY educated without ANY eduaction, even to the point that Jeanne becomes a famous playwrite? Seriously, Smith. And why does everyone constantly fall in love at first sight? I think an author can only safely do this about once in a book or else, unless its of the fairy tale genre, its a little insulting to the reader's intelligence. Nadou with Jeanne, Jeanne with Lois, Lois with Jeanne, Edimee with Lois, Gabrielle with Lois... and who knows how many more times I (thankfully) missed in the last half of the book!

3) The pace of the book: When I got this book, I expected lots of detail, plenty of character development and loads of history. Do not be decieved! I'm not quite sure how Smith dragged the book out for so long being that quite often years pass within one or two pages. Simply put, everything happens far too fast. If something bad happens to a character, you needn't worry... it will be solved within a few paragraphs (and usually in an unbelievable manner, such as Nadou finding Jeanne's brothers in PARIS only after a few hours of searching when he had NO CLUE to their whereabouts). It seemed very much to me that Ms. Kay got bored with a certain scenario and would simply bound ahead to the next one she had in mind which usually meant "years later...". Being as such, none of the characters are ever fully developed. You miss so much of their lives and thoughts that even toward the middle of the book I didn't much care that Nadou was still suffering from lovesickness, that Jeanne was still heartbroken and that Lois was still constantly battling within himself. Why should I when I hardly know the people?

This was, I am aware, a pretty harsh review. It's not particularly terrible if you're just looking for a light history action adventure book... just don't go into it trying to take it as seriously as Ms.Smith does or else you'll end up as irritated at me at its shallow attempt at delving into the human psyche.
Cetnan
First off, I have to admit that I didn't read the entire book. I set it down, determined not to finish it several times but pushed myself through half of it before I finally gave up.
The three main problems I had with this book were these:

1) The style of writing: It's not that I simply didn't prefer the style, it was simply amateurish. While I admire Smith's obvious exstensive study of the history of the time, everything was so melodramatic it was almost embarrasing. The sun couldn't just rise, it had to bleed onto the horizon. The cat couldn't just jump off the windowsill, he had to alight on the floor with the agility and grace of a ballerina. It's tiresome and seems very much like the author ran to the thesaraus after every verb to find something obscure and dramatic.

2) The characters: They are wildly unbelievable and suspicously similar. Nadou, Edimee and Nicolas could only be distinguished by their discriptions. Each of them always says the right thing, are almost always calm until they break open with passion momentarily, and are often making "profound" remarks that thoroughly amaze the other characters in the book (apartently to make up for the certain lack of amazment the reader will feel after one such soliliquy). Jeanne, Gabrielle and Lois could also be easily interchanged. They are all passionate, blunt, stubborn, proud and deal with these emotions in much the same manners. With the dozens of characters Smith shuffles us through, I was suprised at how either similar or cliche they each were... couldn't anyone be shy? Or humorous? Or goofy? Or at least not so annoyingly dramatic? It is also quite a suspension of belief that Nadou and Jeanne could become so VERY educated without ANY eduaction, even to the point that Jeanne becomes a famous playwrite? Seriously, Smith. And why does everyone constantly fall in love at first sight? I think an author can only safely do this about once in a book or else, unless its of the fairy tale genre, its a little insulting to the reader's intelligence. Nadou with Jeanne, Jeanne with Lois, Lois with Jeanne, Edimee with Lois, Gabrielle with Lois... and who knows how many more times I (thankfully) missed in the last half of the book!

3) The pace of the book: When I got this book, I expected lots of detail, plenty of character development and loads of history. Do not be decieved! I'm not quite sure how Smith dragged the book out for so long being that quite often years pass within one or two pages. Simply put, everything happens far too fast. If something bad happens to a character, you needn't worry... it will be solved within a few paragraphs (and usually in an unbelievable manner, such as Nadou finding Jeanne's brothers in PARIS only after a few hours of searching when he had NO CLUE to their whereabouts). It seemed very much to me that Ms. Kay got bored with a certain scenario and would simply bound ahead to the next one she had in mind which usually meant "years later...". Being as such, none of the characters are every fully developed. You miss so much of their lives and thoughts that even toward the middle of the book I didn't much care that Nadou was still suffering from lovesickness, that Jeanne was still heartbroken and that Lois was still constantly battling within himself. Why should I when I hardly know the people?

This was, I am aware, a pretty harsh review. It's not particularly terrible if you're just looking for a light history action adventure book... just don't go into it trying to take it as seriously as Ms.Smith does or else you'll end up as irritated at me at its shallow attempt at delving into the human psyhce.

Thanks for reading, hope this helps.
Simple fellow
The birth and struggles of Romanticism and of three generations of strong women in 18th century France. Begings with the fight to perform Victor Hugo's "Hernani" and ends with the struggle to publish Edmond Rostand's "Cyrano De Bergerac."
Owomed
Kay N Smith writes with such fluidity. I love this tale of Nandou the dwarf who falls in love with an impoverished girl and brings her up. It is a timeless classic and much under appreciated in my view. I bought this book years back and an glad to review it.
Modimeena
Having the mind and soul of an artist that loves beautiful spectacular sunsets and ethereal settings, I found this story was similar in feelings. What Kay Nolte Smith wrote in words could not have been any more artistically expressed than Monet sharing his thoughts with his brush strokes. If the reader would like to read a soul stirring novel, full of compassion and love, then I would recommend this book.
This book had wonderful characters, especially Nandou and Jeanne. The setting of the story in 19th century France really came alive, not only the politics, but the art and theater worlds as well. Highly recommended!!