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ISBN:0880640081
Author: Alfred Doblin,John E. Woods
ISBN13: 978-0880640084
Title: A People Betrayed: November 1918: A German Revolution (English and German Edition)
Format: txt azw lrf lit
ePUB size: 1294 kb
FB2 size: 1711 kb
DJVU size: 1944 kb
Language: English German
Category: Contemporary
Publisher: Fromm Intl (September 1, 1987)
Pages: 656

A People Betrayed: November 1918: A German Revolution (English and German Edition) by Alfred Doblin,John E. Woods



Personal Name: Döblin, Alfred, 1878-1957. Download A people betrayed : November 1918, a German revolution : a novel by Alfred Döblin ; translated from the German by John E. Woods. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book A people betrayed : November 1918, a German revolution : a novel, by Alfred Döblin ; translated from the German by John E.

In A People Betrayed, the first volume of the epic November 1918: A German Revolution, Alfred Doblin takes us into the public and private dramas of these turbulent days, introducing us to a remarkable cast of fictional and historical characters, and bringing them to life in one of the great historical epics of the century. I've rarely seen someone make compelling characters out of people who are real (Teddy Roosevelt solving crimes in Caleb Carr's "The Alienist" is a pretty wince-worthy example). After a few pages, I got that feeling I get when I try to read Mailer, like someone who has spent a lifetime writing instruction manuals has decided to turn their hand to fiction.

November 1918: A German Revolution (German: November 1918, eine deutsche Revolution) is a tetralogy of novels by German writer Alfred Döblin about the German Revolution of 1918–1919. The four volumes-Vol. I: Bürger und Soldaten (Citizens and Soldiers), Vol. II Verratenes Volk (A People Betrayed), Vol. III, Heimkehr der Fronttruppen (Return of the Frontline Troops), and Vol. IV, Karl und Rosa (Karl and Rosa)-together comprise the most significant work from Döblin's period of exile (1933–1945).

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A PEOPLE BETRAYED November 1918: A German Revolution. Translated by John E. 642 pp. New York: Fromm International Publishing. Doeblin's history of the German experience at the end of the first World War--what he calls a revolution, and which it surprises me to realize I'd never really thought to describe with that word--is a really monumental piece of historical fict Sprawling, troubling, remarkable.

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A People Betrayed : November 1918, a German Revolution. Book in the Novembre 1918 Series). The First World War is over, the battle is lost a and everywhere there is talk of revolution.

November 1918. The First World War is over, the battle is lost a and everywhere there is talk of revolution. Leaders of the German military have formed an uneasy alliance with the socialists who control the government and have proclaimed a new German republic, but throughout Berlin rival groups stage rallies and organize strikes. In A People Betrayed, the first volume of the epic November 1918: A German Revolution, Alfred Doblin takes us into the public and private dramas of these turbulent days, introducing us to a remarkable cast of fictional and historical characters, and bringing them to life in one of the great historical epics of the century.
Reviews: 6
Nettale
The Titleof this Book says it all.
Look at what is happening in in the Middle East today
Thetahuginn
Initially interesting but ultimately dissatisfying. The book suffers from WAY too many characters, a tendency to run down rat-holes to give (sometimes helpful, sometimes just silly) 'color' and finally an excruciating trip into the 'spirit world' for the character Becker. I found the presentation of the historical characters interesting and wanted more, and cared about many other characters (specifically the aforementioned Becker) but the constant diversions and random interjections became tiresome.

An interesting book, worth reading -- it just could have been better.
Clonanau
Historical fiction many times runs aground because the fictional characters are basically just ciphers through which events are related. I have this problem with some of Zola's fiction. Reading one of his books is sometimes like sitting on the sidelines watching a game of "Risk" between two people who debate their moves longer than chess masters. The other problem with such books is that when actual historical figures enter the stage, they are hidebound in their behavior by what we know about them and by what they've actually done. I've rarely seen someone make compelling characters out of people who are real (Teddy Roosevelt solving crimes in Caleb Carr's "The Alienist" is a pretty wince-worthy example).

This is a minority report (as a lot of my reviews are), but for me, everything that could go wrong in "A People Betrayed" does go wrong. After a few pages, I got that feeling I get when I try to read Mailer, like someone who has spent a lifetime writing instruction manuals has decided to turn their hand to fiction. This kind of multiple perspective, "God's Eye" view of things can work, as in the truly bizarre science fiction of Olaf Stapledon, or in the historical novels of John Dos Passos. It works in Lovecraft's fiction if only because the anti-human tone is perfect for unveiling his eldritch, otherworldly creations. Doblin is not writing Lovecraftian (sic?) horror, however, from an awe-inspiring and wonderfully misanthropic anti-human perspective, though. He's supposed to be writing a social history through flesh-and-blood characters trying to survive in the aftermath of the Great War.

The German writer Hans Fallada is certainly a master at evoking how what Vonnegut called the "hare of history" overruns the more modest ambitions of those who must endure her mercurial whims. But Doblin doesn't pull off the trick. This is a turgid history book posing as a wide-sweeping work of fiction. I usually find some way to qualify a negative review and I hate to tap out before finishing a book no matter how much I dislike it, but I really hated this book and could not finish it. I could not even slog my way through one-quarter of it. I might perforate my eardrums if it were turned into a book on tape, or gouge out my eyes if it were adapted for the screen.
Fesho
Armistice Day, 11 November 1918. The war that used to be called the Great War, the one President Wilson said would make the world safe for democracy, the war to end all wars but that turned out to be just a prelude – this war had finally come to an end. And then? What would happen in the defeated German Empire? What was going on in the minds of ordinary Germans in those days of confusion?

“All Quiet on the Western Front” had focused on the fate of a small number of characters, from their enthusiastic greeting of the war's outbreak through their experience of its horrors in the trenches to their senseless death in its final days. Remarque had tried to explain why the soldiers who fought on the western front were a lost generation, unable to adjust to peacetime and civilian life.

Doeblin's novel picks up only a few weeks after the end of “All Quiet.” His approach, though, is completely different. Doeblin's panorama is both detailed (in 600 pages, he manages to cover only three hectic weeks) and vast, stretching from Berlin to Strasbourg to Paris, from Wilson – portrayed sympathetically – to the political generals around Hindenburg, to ordinary people like an assistant pharmacist: “What could be more pleasant in all the world, he thought, than to lay one's body, be it ugly or beautiful, in the frying pan of alcohol and let it warm there lightly till it was finally ready for the finest thing in the world – sleep.”

Written during the Second World War and originally published in German in 1948-49, “A People Betrayed” is Doeblin's attempt to explain the origins of Hitler's War by examining the mistakes made in 1918. Max Weber used to say in private conversation that the problem with the Germans was that they had never guillotined a Hohenzollern. They missed their last chance when the Kaiser was allowed to abdicate and take up residence in Holland. Although the monarchy was disposed of, the old conservative institutions, like the general staff and the civil service, provided an element of continuity that would eventually prove fatal. To put down the communists, Ebert's Social Democrats reluctantly cooperated with the Reichswehr officers. It's not clear that they had any better choice, but the founders of the new republic ended up with blood on their hands.

Until the Nazis forced him to emigrate, Doeblin (1878-1957) was not only an author but a practicing physician. Here he writes like a doctor merely describing symptoms, not peering into the souls of his characters. His sympathy lies with the people betrayed by their leaders, though he expresses little of this overtly. He concentrates rather on their personal affairs, like how to find the wherewithal to survive when the entire social structure has been shattered. Though the characters themselves may not be aware of it, Doeblin shows how all their individual problems exist in a larger political context.

“The war is still going on, even if it is not in the trenches anymore.” Now it is being waged in the minds of those who survived. Among the politically aware characters, some want to change man's soul through a rebirth in Christ, while others want to change the social structure from top to bottom, though these Germans prove singularly inept at revolution. Doeblin's sympathies clearly lie with the former group, yet his concept of Christianity allows for harsh criticism of social ills – and of the church as an institution.

What makes this neglected masterpiece worth reading is Doeblin's gift for presenting characters both high and low in a panoramic sweep. He treats all his many figures with clinical distance, as if he could control his anger only through self-imposed detachment. Readers not well familiar with this period of German history would, however, have profited from some explanatory notes. Nonetheless, this readable translation (by John E. Woods) should serve to introduce a great author to the wider audience he deserves.