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ISBN:1616576561
Author: Robertson Dean,F. Scott Fitzgerald
ISBN13: 978-1616576561
Title: The Great Gatsby [With Earbuds] (Playaway Adult Fiction)
Format: txt doc rtf lit
ePUB size: 1367 kb
FB2 size: 1485 kb
DJVU size: 1684 kb
Language: English
Category: Classics
Publisher: Tantor Audio (May 1, 2010)

The Great Gatsby [With Earbuds] (Playaway Adult Fiction) by Robertson Dean,F. Scott Fitzgerald



Only Gatsby, the man who gives his name to this book, was exempt from my reaction - Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn. If personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures, then there was something gorgeous about him, some heightened sensitivity to the promises of life, as if he were related to one of those intricate machines that register earthquakes ten thousand miles away. I never saw this great-uncle, but I’m supposed to look like him - with special reference to the rather hard-boiled painting that hangs in father’s office. I graduated from New Haven in 1915, just a quarter of a century after my father, and a little later I participated in that delayed Teutonic migration known as the Great War. I enjoyed the counter-raid so thoroughly that I came back restless.

ThePinkElephant:'The Great Gatsby is in many ways similar to Romeo and Juliet yet it is so much more than a love story. But that is the beauty of the book. Of course you hate Daisy Buchanan! Of course you hate Tom! You even begin to slightly dislike Gatsby, to whom it is not enough for Daisy to say that she loved him, but requires her to state that she never in her five year marriage loved her husband Tom. But Gatsby, to me, remains Great right until the end of this book. In Fitzgerald's masterpiece nothing is made whole by this tragedy. Many consider The Great Gatsby to be depressing because, in the end, those who dream do not achieve their aspirations. However, the main message that Fitzgerald sends to us isn't that dreaming will lead to despair, but that chasing an unworthy dream will lead to tragedy. Want to tell the world about a book you've read?

The Great Gatsby is, I believe, the most perfectly crafted work of fiction to have come out of America' Tony Tanner, in the Introduction 'A modern classic, a key American novel. For once, Fitzgerald really had won what he wanted: to create, amid the glitter and the gold, "a conscious artistic achievement" ' Malcolm Bradbury, Mail on Sunday. F. Scott Fitzgerald was born in 1896 in St Paul, Minnesota, and went to Princeton University, which he left in 1917 to join the army. He was said to have epitomized the Jazz Age, which he himself denied as 'a generation grown up to find all Gods dead, all wars fought, all faiths in man shaken'. In 1920 he married Zelda Sayre. Their traumatic marriage and her subsequent breakdowns became the leading influence in his writing. Published by the Penguin Group.

The Great Gatsby is the story of eccentric millionaire Jay Gatsby as told by Nick Carraway, a Midwesterner who lives on Long Island but works in Manhattan. Gatsby’s enormous mansion is adjacent to Carraway’s modest home, and Carraway becomes curious about his neighbor after being invited to one of his famous parties. Nick soon learns that Gatsby is in love Daisy Buchanan, Nick’s cousin and the wife of one Tom Buchanan, an acquaintance of Nick’s from Yale

THE GREAT GATSBY, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession, it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s. The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.

The Great Gatsby is F. Scott Fitzgerald's greatest novel-a book that offers damning and insightful views of the American nouveau riche in the 1920s. The Great Gatsby is an American classic and a wonderfully evocative work. Like much of Fitzgerald's prose, it is neat and well-crafted. Fitzgerald has a brilliant understanding of lives that are corrupted by greed and turn out incredibly sad and unfulfilled. He was able to translate this understanding into one of the finest pieces of literature of the 1920s. They are the society persons so prominent during the 1920s and 1930s. Like his novel The Beautiful and the Damned, Fitzgerald attacks the shallow social climbing and emotional manipulation-which only causes pain. With a decadent cynicism, the party-goers in The Great Gatsby cannot see anything beyond their own enjoyment.

The Great Gatsby is a Historical novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Jay Gatsby is the man who has everything. But one thing will always be out of his reach. Everybody who is anybody is seen at his glittering parties. Day and night his Long Island mansion buzzes with bright young things drinking, dancing, and debating his mysterious character. For Gatsby--young, handsome, and fabulously rich--always seems alone in the crowd, watching and waiting, though no one knows what for. Beneath the shimmering surface of his life he is hiding a secret: a silent longing that can never be fulfilled. And soon this destructive obsession will force his world to unravel.

We drove over to Fifth Avenue, so warm and soft, almost pastoral, on the summer Sunday afternoon that I wouldn’t have been surprised to see a great flock of white sheep turn the corner. Hold on, I said, I have to leave you here. No, you don’t, interposed Tom quickly. I beg your pardon, said Mr. McKee with dignity, I didn’t know I was touching it. All right, I agreed, I’ll be glad t. .I was standing beside his bed and he was sitting up between the sheets, clad in his underwear, with a great portfolio in his hands. Beauty and the Beast.

As rare and astounding as the art of Rembrandt, Renoir and Rodin, F. Scott Fitzgerald's short novel casts a spell on me in his painting Love, Truth, Mythology and Tragedy in words so poignant, eloquent and gorgeous that I, a mere mortal, cannot do them justice, so I must quote (though I typically prefer not to)

Confused about The Great Gatsby plot? Our complete summary outlines exactly what happens in the novel, as well as the major characters and themes. Maybe you’ve just finished The Great Gatsby and need some guidance for unpacking its complex themes and symbols. Or maybe it’s been awhile since you last read this novel, so you need a refresher on its plot and characters. Or maybe you’re in the middle of reading it and want to double check that you’re not missing the important stuff. Whatever you need - we’ve got you covered with this comprehensive summary of one of the great American novels of all time!

Reviews: 7
Aurizar
This review is about this version of the book, not the story itself. This is a "bootleg" version of the book, not an authentic publication. The cover has a poor quality picture (as evidenced by the visible pixels) and the book itself is typed in a different font than the publisher intended. I purchased this book for my son's high school english class and we had to get a different copy as this version has NO publication information. NO copyright information. Students are required to cite that information and this book doesn't even have a page for this information. Had I known, I would have purchased a different version. Unfortunately, the class didn't start reading the book until after my return window had closed or it would have gone back for sure.
 The Great Gatsby
Vuzahn
I don't know how I made it through high school without reading this classic, but I'm so glad I get to come back to books like this and read them as an adult. I'm sure I would have learned stuff in high school, but I feel like I'm getting more appreciation out of books like this as I get older.
The only thing I knew about this book before I started reading was that it was a shallow love story that ends with the girl dumping the poor, innocent guy....or something. And yes that is the plot, but I think the story can also be about the American dream and who it's really available to. What is the American dream? Is it just getting money and it doesn't matter how? Did we really get away from social inequality? I hadn't really thought about any of that before reading this book. It made me wonder what my American dream is. Do I just want to get lots of money, a big house, and tons of stuff? Or is there more to it than that? Without spoiling the end, I feel like Mr. Fitzgerald's opinion on the matter is that some people are born to live the American dream and some aren't - and there isn't much you can do to change it. The fate of Daisy and Gatsby really brings that tragic idea home.

The parties were unreal. I was drooling over the mention of all the food. I couldn't help but imagine the Dowager Countess from Downton Abbey coming to Gatsby's house and being appalled at what Americans called "a dinner party." My mind was buzzing with all the practical details and sheer amount of money that it would take to feed two dinners and tons of alcohol to that many people... But the parties and glamour are just covering up the fact that most of these people are shady, immoral, hypocritical and just plain unhappy. Especially Tom and his wife Daisy.

I loved the writing. It was simple, charming, and witty - an interesting contrast to the much deeper story going on. The last line about how we can't escape from the past points out that even though as Americans we say that anyone can achieve wealth, happiness and equality, the truth is we keep getting sucked into the rules of the past.

The only thing I thought was overdone was the symbolic Eye Doctor bilboard in the ash valley. Don't let the symbolic Eye Doctor Ad/God's Judgement fall on you on the way out.

Overall, a novel that got me really thinking about life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness in the context of a beautiful, tragic, and romantic story.
Watikalate
I believe the alchemy of time, place and the right talent and drive can create in an author the story and words to compose a portrait of truth and beauty that transcends time; a work of supreme art so rare and splendid that it is revered because our soul longs to be transported to the splendor of a moment in time and desires to be granted the providence to create something so divine that through it we may survive on this Earth forever.

As rare and astounding as the art of Rembrandt, Renoir and Rodin, F. Scott Fitzgerald's short novel casts a spell on me in his painting Love, Truth, Mythology and Tragedy in words so poignant, eloquent and gorgeous that I, a mere mortal, cannot do them justice, so I must quote (though I typically prefer not to):

“The loneliest moment in someone’s life is when they are watching their whole world fall apart, and all they can do is stare blankly.”

***

“In his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the stars.”

***

“His heart beat faster and faster as Daisy’s white face came up to his own. He knew that when he kissed this girl, and forever wed his unutterable visions to her perishable breath, his mind would never romp again like the mind of God. So he waited, listening for a moment longer to the tuning fork that had been struck upon a star. Then he kissed her. At his lips’ touch she blossomed like a flower and the incarnation was complete.”

***

“And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And one fine morning——

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
***

This is my favorite American novel.