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Download The Beautiful and Damned epub book
ISBN:078619815X
Author: William Dufris,F Scott Fitzgerald
ISBN13: 978-0786198153
Title: The Beautiful and Damned
Format: mbr docx lrf azw
ePUB size: 1324 kb
FB2 size: 1994 kb
DJVU size: 1111 kb
Language: English
Category: Classics
Publisher: Craig Black; Unabridged edition (November 1, 2000)

The Beautiful and Damned by William Dufris,F Scott Fitzgerald



The Beautiful and Damned. 5 5 Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald Narrator: William Dufris. As in Fitzgerald's other novels, the characters are complex, especially with respect to marriage and intimacy. The book is believed to be largely based on Fitzgerald's relationship with Zelda Fitzgerald.

Scott Fitzgerald's second novel, The Beautiful and the Damned, "marks an advance over This Side of Paradise," Edmund Wilson wrote. The style is more nearly mature and the subject more nearly unified, and there are scenes that are more convincing than any in his previous fiction. Published in 1922, it chronicles the relationship of Anthony Patch, Harvard-educated aspiring aesthete, and his beautiful wife, Gloria, as they wait to inherit his grandfather's fortune. A devastating satire of the nouveaux rich and New York's nightlife, of reckless ambition and. With The Beautiful and the Damned, . People Who Liked The Beautiful and Damned Also Liked These Free Titles

Lyrical, romantic, yet cruelly incisive, it signaled a new stage in Fitzgerald’s career. With The Beautiful and Damned, . Announce URL: This Torrent also has several backup trackers.

The book hesitated and then suddenly went. A spokesman of the Salvation Army denounced it as a cynical misrepresentation of all the uplift taking place in the underworld. Clever press-agenting spread the unfounded rumour that Gypsy Smith was beginning a libel suit because one of the principal characters was a burlesque of himself. It was barred from the public library of Burlington, Iowa, and a mid-Western columnist announced by innuendo that Richard Caramel was in a sanatorium with delirium tremens.

In The Beautiful and The Damned, F Scott Fitzgerald explores the trivial and shallow lives of the well-heeled inheritors of the American Dream the second or third generation that can afford to live on the fortunes that their forbears worked so hard to accumulate. The book traces the life of Anthony Patch between the ages of 25 and 33 and focuses intensely on his almost obsessive love for the gorgeous looking Gloria Gilbert.

Dufris' reading reflects the sophistry of aristocracy that Fitzgerald both hated and desired. Attn: Author/Narrator If you have any queries please contact me at info19782 @ gmail.

Home F. Scott Fitzgerald The Beautiful and Damned. The beautiful and damned, . 8. Because she was brave, because she was "spoiled," because of her outrageous and commendable independence of judgment, and finally because of her arrogant consciousness that she had never seen a girl as beautiful as herself, Gloria had developed into a consistent, practising Nietzschean. This, of course, with overtones of profound sentiment.

The Beautiful and Damned. First published in 1922. Last updated Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 13:39. To the best of our knowledge, the text of this work is in the Public Domain in Australia.

Narrated by William Dufris. Set in the heady Jazz Age of New York, The Beautiful and Damned chronicles the relationship between Anthony Patch, a Harvard-educated aspiring aesthete, and his beautiful trophy wife, Gloria, as they wait to inherit his grandfather's fortune. Anticipating easy millions, they embrace the glittering, hedonistic lifestyle of the pretentious nouveaux riches but find that they are living a dream that is all too fleeting. A devastating satire of reckless ambition and squandered talent, Fitzgerald's novel is also a shattering portrait of a marriage wasted by alcohol and wealth.

Written By: F. Scott Fitzgerald. Narrated By: William Dufris. Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks. Duration: 13 hours 4 minutes. Summary: Set in the heady Jazz Age of New York, The Beautiful and Damned chronicles the relationship between Anthony Patch, a Harvard-educated aspiring aesthete, and his beautiful trophy wife, Gloria, as they wait to inherit his grandfather's fortune. Anticipating easy millions, they embrace the glittering, hedonistic lifestyle of the pretentious nouveaux riches, but find that they are living a dream that is all too fleeting

Set in the heady Jazz Age of New York, The Beautiful and Damned chronicles the relationship between Anthony Patch, a Harvard-educated aspiring aesthete, and his beautiful trophy wife, Gloria, as they wait to inherit his grandfather's fortune. Anticipating easy millions, they embrace the glittering, hedonistic lifestyle of the pretentious nouveaux riches but find that they are living a dream that is all too fleeting. A devastating satire of reckless ambition and squandered talent, Fitzgerald's novel is also a shattering portrait of a marriage wasted by alcohol and wealth. It depicts an America embarked on the greatest spree in its history, a world Fitzgerald embraced even as he attacked its false social values and shallow literary tastes. Lyrical, romantic, yet cruelly incisive, it signaled a new stage in Fitzgerald's career.
Reviews: 7
Quttaro
There's a reason F. Scott is one of the GOATs. What he can do in describing a dinner scene is greater than what most authors can do in their entire novels. The words here are beautiful, decadent, oozing style and grace and charm and sensuality in spades. While the pacing is often slow, when you realize that it was done deliberately you begin to enjoy the words upon words F. Scott uses to delve into the minutiae of these people's lives. Anthony and Gloria aren't exactly likable characters, and they weren't meant to be, but in watching their lives fall apart and their dreams become ever more deferred they do manage to extract a tiny bit of sympathy from the reader. If you have some time on your hands and enjoy a little bit of schaudenfreude, it's more than worth a read.
Jan
I enjoyed reading this novel for Fitzgerald's brilliant portrayal of broken and twisted characters who give into the Seven Deadly Sins, and their rewards. Fitzgerald's writing style in this book makes it apparent that he's still developing and honing his skill, yet it doesn't distract from the story. I really like "The Beautiful and Damned."
Vikus
The Beautiful and Damned is Fitzgerald's second book and is set in pre Jazz Age NYC. It is a dark and depressing story of the American aristocracy and nouveau-riche. The author writes a scathing commentary on society life and his tone is cynical and critical of nearly every character he introduces us to.

There is nothing redeeming about our two selfish and shallow protagonists, Anthony and Gloria. It's all about greed, manipulation, pettiness and depravity. If, as is thought, Gloria is based on Fitzgerald's wife, Zelda, it's not a very flattering portrayal. Gloria is trading on her beauty and Anthony on his promised inheritance. I felt no sympathy for these two, who find themselves in dire straits due mostly to their hedonism and stupidity. Both are pathetic.

While there are very many well written passages, some parts of the novel seemed over long. The story did keep me guessing as it unfolded, but I anticipated a bad end to this well-matched couple: well-matched in their extreme narcissism and lack of morale ethic.

Fitzgerald thoroughly convinced me there was nothing glamorous about the endless partying, resulting alcoholism and broken, useless lives of the Beautiful and Damned.
Kamick
Nearly ninety years after its first publication, _The Beautiful and Damned_ is still a shockingly relevant account of the entitlement class, the children of the rich or privileged who don't know how to navigate through life without big money. And, it's a New York City novel--written as only a mid-westerner can. It seems to me that because New Yorkers are too much in the middle of it to see themselves clearly, an intelligent "outsider" like F. Scott Fitzgerald must come along. To write as well as he did, Fitzgerald let the city inhabit him. New York got into his blood, and he recorded it in narrative right down to the dirt under the carpet. Fitzgerald's details lead the reader into the depths of the beautiful and doomed couple, the Gloria-Anthony entanglement, as they are part and parcel of the extremes of poverty and wealth (in the World War I era or the roaring 20s).

I don't know how Fitzgerald knew what he knew about the human psyche, or specifically about how a young man might react when he is good-looking and swimming in money and New York, but Fitz's life at Princeton University among this set of people gave him the environment in which to observe; Fitzgerald supplied the story around which the narrative coheres. Of course, there are autobiographical elements to this novel--a lot of himself and Zelda--but what the literary art requires is critical distance. To put his main characters through some shameful scenes, Fitzgerald had to know what tough love is in the New York City context. He had to put his couple to the test, people who from birth had relied on the "religion" of charm and money. And the author had more than just critical distance: F. Scott had them down right! Every expression, every word. Gloria: "This is life! Who cares for the morrow." And you can see Anthony deciding to have one more drink, his speech becoming slurred, his manners maudlin. While Anthony and Gloria wait for his inheritance, we find out what they're made of.

Most pleasurable about Fitzgerald's craft is his carefully-controlled technique of letting Anthony and Gloria visit hell (the "damned" in the title) while softening the harsh surgery-like light with well-timed, well-handled, lyrical sentences. In a single beautiful line, the passage of the winter sun describes both Fitzgerald's craft and his beautiful couple's descent: Gloria "lay still for a moment in the great bed watching the February sun suffer one last attenuated refinement in its passage through the leaded panes into the room" (p.173). Fitzgerald knew how to show the attenuated and refined way downhill.

One more thing about the craft of writing: Only the omniscient narrator technique--which Fitzgerald employs--can show characters in shameful acts and show what they're thinking, and the circumstances in which they got there, and how they "need" money in order to "survive." I wonder if now, in nearly 2010, this novel is not more important than in 1922. More than ever, _The Beautiful and Damned_ is a national portrait. (I can see how "spending" money could be the "sex" in the novel.)

Advice: Read this novel while in New York, if possible. The first time I read _The Beautiful and Damned_, I was living near 123rd (me, a Westerner!). I looked up every address in the novel (except for the gray house near Cos Cob, Conn.) and got to know New York through this novel. In fact, I could almost pick out their final apartment in Harlem near 127th.