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ISBN:1558612645
Author: Ritu Menon,Shashi Deshpande
ISBN13: 978-1558612648
Title: A Matter of Time
Format: mbr lit txt lrf
ePUB size: 1917 kb
FB2 size: 1168 kb
DJVU size: 1398 kb
Language: English
Category: British and Irish
Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY; 1st edition (May 1, 2001)
Pages: 272

A Matter of Time by Ritu Menon,Shashi Deshpande



Shashi Deshpande's book, for one, begins at a different kind of starting point. Most storylines tend to start at the happy facade, veer into the sad twist, and thereon, chart a way forward. With bittersweet pride, I have to agree that is correct. Shashi Deshpande's book, for one, begins at a different kind of starting point. A matter of time is an honest, emotionally retrospective & complex book, mostly because it explores human relationships with this web of interwoven connections, & you're still just a spectator. an island in all that chaos & complexity.

Shashi Deshpande's book "A Matter of Time" is a "must" book for all those who are interested in the Indian way of thinking. In her book Deshpande tries to answer some very important questions like, "What is a relationship?", "What is life?", "What is death?", "Is death the final act which wipes out all that has been?" - questions that have bothered human beings from time immemorial. Seeped in Indian thoughts and philosophical thinking, rich in Indian images, the novel is a tapestry of human relationships. Thus in this novel Shashi Deshpande brings together women of three generations and shows their different outlooks on life. As with her other books, a variety of experiences await the reader of this novel. What a reader gets out of this book very much depends on the his/her own mental frame work. This novel is not meant to entertain, but to enlighten.

debut, "austere, philosophical, and rich; a work that. grows in moral force and pathos. Set in present-day Karnataka, A Matter of Time explores the intricate relationships within an extended family, encompassing three generations. Images from Hindu religion, myth, and local history intertwine delicately with images of contemporary India as the women face and accept the changes that have suddenly become part of their lives.

Shashi Deshpande, Ritu Menon (Afterword). She was awarded the Padma Shri in 2008. List of books by Shashi Deshpande. Dark Holds No Terrors (1982) That Long Silence (1989) A Matter of Time Moving On Small Remedies Shadow Play (2013) The Narayanpur Incident If I Die Today In the Country of Deceit The Binding Vine Ships That Pass (2012) The Intrusion And Other Stories 3 Novels : A Summer Adventure, The Hidden Treasure, The Only Witness Come Up & Be Dead Collected Stories (Volume - 1). Collected Stories (Volume - 2) Writing from the Margin: And Other Essays. Books by Shashi Deshpande

Book: A Matter of Time. Author: Shashi Deshpande Genre: Fiction. Publisher : Penguin Books. Deshpande’s simple yet powerful prose reads like a grandmother’s tale, that pierces deep into heart and settles. The last meeting of Gopal and Sumi is bluntly put It is on this note of laughter they part Deshpande writes and as one starts imagining the possibility of their union one reads They will not meet again.

Afterword by Ritu Menon. New York: The Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 1999.

System Control Number: (Sirsi) 3221651. ed. Publication, Distribution, et. New York. Feminist Press at the City University of New York, (c)1999. Projected Publication Date

One morning, with no warning, Gopal, respected professor and devoted husband and father, walks out on his family for reasons even he cannot articulate. One morning, with no warning, Gopal, respected professor, devoted husband, and caring father, walks out on his family for reasons even he cannot articulate. His wife, Sumi returns with their three daughters to the shelter of the Big House, where her parents live in oppressive silence: they have not spoken to each other in 35 years.

One morning, with no warning, Gopal, respected professor, devoted husband, and caring father, walks out on his family for reasons even he cannot articulate. His wife, Sumi returns with their three daughters to the shelter of the Big House, where her parents live in oppressive silence: they have not spoken to each other in 35 years. As the mystery of this long silence is unraveled, a horrifying story of loss and pain is laid bare—a story that seems to be repeating itself in Sumi's life.This multigenerational story, told in the individual voices of the characters, catches each in turn the cycles of love, loss, strength, and renewal that becomes an essential part of the women's identities. A Matter of Time reveals the hidden springs of character while painting a nuanced portrait of the difficulties and choices facing women—especially educated, independent women—in India today.
Reviews: 5
Shalizel
Shashi Deshpande's book "A Matter of Time" is a "must" book for all those who are interested in the Indian way of thinking. In her book Deshpande tries to answer some very important questions like, "What is a relationship?", "What is life?", "What is death?", "Is death the final act which wipes out all that has been?" - questions that have bothered human beings from time immemorial. Seeped in Indian thoughts and philosophical thinking, rich in Indian images, the novel is a tapestry of human relationships. It is quite unconventional in the way it uses the relationships within a family to explore the ways open to a man who is disenchanted with the material world. Gopal who he is haunted by a feeling of emptiness walks out of his family life leaving behind his young and beautiful wife, Sumi and three daughters. Sumi accepts his decision even if she does not understand it, and concentrates on continuing to live. It is as if within her heart she knows that no human being has the right to chain up another one, that each person has to travel the path of life alone. Aru, the eldest daughter does not have this ripeness of outlook. Just 17 years of age, she thinks that justice is something which can be obtained in a court of law. She divides life into fair and unfair zones. Kalyani, the grand mother has led a macabre married life. Her husband has not talked to her for decades, and leads a solitary life in a room built on the top of the house. But the fact that he is there in the house seems to lend an air of respectability to Kalyani's life. She does not understand the loneliness of the heart, and neither understands why Gopal has walked out nor why Sumi takes it so calmly. Thus in this novel Shashi Deshpande brings together women of three generations and shows their different outlooks on life. As with her other books, a variety of experiences await the reader of this novel. What a reader gets out of this book very much depends on the his/her own mental frame work. This novel is not meant to entertain, but to enlighten.
post_name
As a writer, Deshpande speaks with the voice of truth. The core of her talent is a profound understanding of the layered complexities of women's familial interactions, the nurturing friendships and smoldering silences of past deeds. She weaves the story of four generations of Indian women caught in the "metaphor of silence".
When Gopal, in a rush of existential angst, tells his wife, Sumi, that he cannot stay married, he makes this decision in good faith. Unable to find joy in the small moments of family, he is hyper-aware of the fleeting nature of happiness. With the simple intention to be true to himself, he sets in place a series of events with tragic consequences. The most wrenching change is for Sumi, Gopal's beautiful still-young wife, who must return to live in her parents home with three young daughters. In her struggle for a new definition of herself, Sumi grieves and accepts the loss of her marriage, discovers untapped strengths within herself and possibilities for her future. Sumi begins anew knowing that "where I stand is always the center to me". Of the girls, Anu, the oldest, struggles hardest to understand how her everyday simplicity could change so drastically. She watches the grownups carefully: her mother, Sumi, her grandmother, Kalyani, and distant grandfather, Shripati. And Anu listens to old family stories in an attempt to comprehend the intricacies of the women's subtle alliances.
No one is prepared for tragedy as they attempt to reassemble their hopes and dreams with an eye to the future. But life is ever unpredictable and this Indian family is dealt a blow that leaves them staggering for balance. In her powerful, quiet way, Deshpande lovingly renders her complex characters, bringing the reader into their home just long enough to love these women too, and mourn their loss, a rare gift in a writer.
Varshav
This book is fantastic! Deshpande uses such incredible imagery, such rich detail, I felt like I was part of the book. While exploring the inner workings of the Indian brain, this book also deals with the strength and power of Indian family life. I read this book from cover to cover in one sitting, and would gladly read it again. I absolutely loved it!
thrust
This must have been the most boring, hard to follow book I have read in my life.
There was not enought substance to hate it or to love it...just plain boring.
Uafrmaine
I confess I could not even complete the book. There are too many characters and it was hard to keep track of everybody. I had to go back many times to check whether the character was really introduced before. The description of places was remarkable. I felt I was physically 'seeing'them. The story might be enlighetening to some but Shashi Deshpande must keep the pace and interest of the reader. There were hardly any dramatic happenings in the first half which I read. Do the readers feel compel to read? My definite answer was big NO. Unless the reader feels compulsion to turn over the page and reach the last page neither entertainment nor enlightenment will be experienced.