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ISBN:0198258526
Author: A. W. Brian Simpson
ISBN13: 978-0198258520
Title: Leading Cases in the Common Law
Format: mbr lrf txt lit
ePUB size: 1457 kb
FB2 size: 1754 kb
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Language: English
Category: Specialties
Publisher: Oxford University Press (October 19, 1995)
Pages: 336

Leading Cases in the Common Law by A. W. Brian Simpson



Simpson, A. W. B. (Alfred William Brian). Publication, Distribution, et. Oxford On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Leading cases in the common law, . Brian Simpson online for free.

Brian Simpson's new book addresses the phenomenon of the leading case-the judicial decision which acquires a timeless quality, coming the stand for some legal idea, or principle, or doctrine thought to be central to the casuistic tradition of the common law. How do such cases arise in the first place? Can we tell why they were decided as they were? How do they come to ach Brian Simpson's new book addresses the phenomenon of the leading case-the judicial decision which acquires a timeless quality, coming the stand for some legal idea, or principle, or doctrine thought to be central.

This book offers a collection of essays by arguably the most popular legal historian writing today.

Brian Simpson's new book addresses the phenomenon of the leading case-the judicial decision which acquires a timeless quality. Book Condition: BOOK: SOFTCOVER: COVER: Light edgewear, Very Good. PAGES: Clean, bright, unmarked, Very Good.

the common law. How do such cases arise in the first place? Can we tell why they were decided as they were? . 3. Description this book Brian Simpson s new book addresses the phenomenon of the leading case-the judicial decision which acquires a timeless quality, coming the stand for some legal idea, or priniciple, or doctrine thought to be central to the casuistic tradition of the common law. How do such cases arise in the first place?

Leading cases in the common law. By . Oxford: Clarendon Press. The notion of collecting "leading cases," Professor . Brian Simpson' informs the reader of this engaging and profoundly sub-versive book, emerged in the nineteenth century as a handmaiden to the ideal of legal science. The cases gave a method of learning law not as a hodgepodge of precedents but as a coherent body of principles. valuable chapters in the book. Fowleris known as the origin point in English law for the fellow-servant doctrine, that an employee may not hold his em-ployer vicariously liable for another employee's negligence (p. 109).

This book offers a collection of chapters by arguably the most popular legal historian writing today. This book offers a collection of chapters by arguably the most popular legal historian writing today.

W. Brian Simpson, The late . He was also an honorary fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford and an Honorary Queen's Counsel. Reflections on 'The Concept of Law'. Leading Cases in the Common Law. A. Brian Simpson. Fiduciaries of Humanity. Evan J. Criddle, Evan Fox-Decent.

Born in Kendal, Cumbria, Simpson was educated at Oakham School and The Queen's College, Oxford, where he took a First in Law.

Brian Simpson's new book addresses the phenomenon of the leading case--the judicial decision which acquires a timeless quality, coming the stand for some legal idea, or priniciple, or doctrine thought to be central to the casuistic tradition of the common law. How do such cases arise in the first place? Can we tell why they were decided as they were? How do they come to achieve their special status? By a detailed and meticulous investigaion of their original historical context, and by tracing out their strange intellectual history, this book develops a highly original approach to the study of judicial decisions; one which represents an attack upon the deeply anti-empirical tradition of academic legal writing. Written in an unpretentious style, and in a manner which assumes of the reader no special legal expertise, this book will appeal to all those who are interested in the cultural and social history of the law and of legal thought, and who like to combine intellectual stimulation with the innocent pleasure of a good read.
Reviews: 2
Mightsinger
I read this book in bits and pieces during my first term of law school while taking Torts, Contracts, and Constitutional, but really wish that I had read it over the summer before. Many of the cases that Professor Simpson uses showed up in my courses and demonstrate many of the key concepts that law students learn. But, Professor Simpson, unlike the casebook authors (for obvious space reasons), actually explains a lot of the detail and history of the cases, making them much more real to the law student or average joe reader. His explanations and history are also entertaining (in his typical weird British way!). For some cases and concepts, I even ended up going back to this book to get a better explanation.

While it will be easier to read if you have some basic legal knowledge, it's also great fun if you're even remotely interested in law or the weird things that the (primarily British) people get up to in these old cases.
Mikarr
A high rating for this book, although now more than fifteen years since publication, because it selects well-known cases and presents their backgrounds and aftermaths in a readable fashion. The reader does need to have a working knowledge of the basis principles in the various areas of law (e.g., law of contract, law of torts) and for that reason it is not really a layperson's book. Having said that, it has both breadth and depth of comment presented in a fashion that maintains interest, and assembles subsequent legal opinion and reflection that is not available in a succinct way elsewhere. Some other cases could have been added, but the ones chosen are appropriate and most will be well-known to law