» » Logical Chess, Move by Move
Download Logical Chess, Move by Move epub book
ISBN:0671211358
Author: Irving Chernev
ISBN13: 978-0671211356
Title: Logical Chess, Move by Move
Format: lrf txt txt lrf
ePUB size: 1199 kb
FB2 size: 1145 kb
DJVU size: 1758 kb
Language: English
Category: Puzzles and Games
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; New edition edition (January 1, 1957)
Pages: 250

Logical Chess, Move by Move by Irving Chernev



My first chess book was a Dover paperback copy of Irving Chernev's "The Most Instructive Games Ever Played". Unfortunately it was written in the archaic Descriptive (lol) chess notation which was basically unreadable.

Logical Chess - Move By . .has been added to your Cart. End of story for Game 1, as far as this book goes. Yet in this game, my "Spider Sense" told me that Black was playing a little too ambitiously against said lagging development, and Black's king-side attack is precise but hardly dominating. What's more, the final move of this particular game, as played in Berlin in 1907, Black's 17th move, is not a forcing move.

Logical Chess" is an excellent book of first chess games. It has helped me tremendously, and I would highly recommend it to anyone. May 13, 2008 If you hunt around the internet for the thousands of conversations in which beginners have asked for book recommendations, you'll find that Logical Chess is recommended to beginners more often than all other chess books combined. That's really all you need to know. When games and segments are used in a book, I do think the move by move method of explanation is excellent for beginner to novice, so I do look for that feature in topical books. I've learned a lot about pawn structure, strong and week squares, and the purpose of earlier moves that prepare for later moves, from the move by move explanations in some of my books on openings, for example. If you decide to go the topical route, I would recommend two books

Logical Chess Move by Move. Chess book by Chernev. Irving Chernev - Logical Chess - Move by Move. Libro de Ajedrez para nivel intermedioDescrição completa. Libro de Ajedrez para nivel intermedio. Logical Chess Move by Move. Logical Chess Move by MoveFull description. Logical Chess Move by MoveDescrição completa. Fighting Chess Move by Move. Stein Move by Move 2015.

In this much loved classic, Irving Chernev explains 33 complete games in detail, telling the reader the reason for every single move. Playing through these games and explanations gives a real insight into the power of the pieces and how to post them most effectively. Endgame Strategy (Russian Chess). Modern Chess Tactics: Pieces and Pawns in Action by Ludek Pachman. Vasily Smyslov: Endgame Virtuoso. Shall We Play Fischerandom Chess?

com, or try your local bookshop Distributed in the United States and Canada by Sterling Publishing C. 387 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10 016, USA.

Download Chessbook - Irving Chernev - Logical Chess - Move by Move. Report "Chessbook - Irving Chernev - Logical Chess - Move by Move". Please fill this form, we will try to respond as soon as possible. Posts : 130 Points : 416 Reputation : 82 Join date : 2011-01-01. Logical Chess Move By Move Irving Chernev.

Publication date 1957. Topics Chess, Échecs (Jeu). PublisherNew York : Simon and Schuster. Collectioninlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Digitizing sponsorInternet Archive. ContributorInternet Archive. I recomened that book! 661 Borrows. ENCRYPTED DAISY download. For print-disabled users.

By describing every move of thirty-three tournament games, the author illuminates the inner workings of a master's mind and the basic principles of position play
Reviews: 7
Centrizius
I am currently on game 30 out of 33 in this book, and am rated around 1300 USCF. This is the now my favorite chess book of all time. The book has really taught me that every move in a game is important. Now when I make a move I am thinking to myself "what is the purpose of this move" and asking what my opponents moves accomplish.
Previously I was not a big fan of chess books, and preferred using software or videos. But this book presents the material in a really exciting way. The author shows no arrogance and does not use examples from his own games (even Yasser Seriwan can't resist a "watch how I saw this 30 move combination and used it to defeat silly Karpov!") that are more about ego gratification than teaching. Additionally the book is well edited, and I only found one small mistake.
Some people might not like the style of how ideas are repeated over and over, like explaining the first moves the Queens Gambit again and again. At first I did not either, but now I realize after reading 90% of the book that it really helped the ideas to sink in, and now I can use these ideas in my play.
... Some people might be able to read the book without setting up pieces, but I was not able to do this and fully understand all of the variations and ideas. There are quite a lot of diagrams though.
Went Tyu
Ok, firstly, I'm not rated 1200, I'm around 1800. As such, I am reading this book for the purpose of being able to recommend it to some beginner players.

I do think it's great, Irving Chernev-- as usual-- is great, and the format of this book is superb for beginners or advanced beginners.

That being said, it's important to note that computers have changed everything in how we must study chess.

Case in point: Game 1 of this book, "von Scheve - Teichmann, Berlin 1907".

Now a general rule is that when you come across a game between a player you've never heard of versus a great grandmaster you have heard of, odds are good that the GM you've heard of wins. This game is no exception, with Teichmann threatening checkmate two different ways upon move 17, and von Scheve, who must have been understandably intimidated, resigns. End of story for Game 1, as far as this book goes.

But the thing is that Chernev selected this game in order to demonstrate the vital chess concept of good development and counter-play against weaker development. Yet in this game, my "Spider Sense" told me that Black was playing a little too ambitiously against said lagging development, and Black's king-side attack is precise but hardly dominating. What's more, the final move of this particular game, as played in Berlin in 1907, Black's 17th move, is not a forcing move. White thus has free reign on move #18. Yes, things look bleak with Teichmann's twin mate threats (as described by Chernev), but he does have available the move 18. Bc4 x f7+ (Check!). So is it a little pre-mature to resign?

Well, I plugged Game 1's final position into Shredder 2600 (Droid phone app, Grand Master strength) and played 18. Bc4 x f7+, and here's what Shredder found from there (with Shredder 2600 playing both sides):

18 Bxf7+
18……………… Ke7
19 Bg5+
19……………… Kf8
20 Bf4
20……………… Qxf4
21 Bh5
21……………… Nf6
22 Rxf2
22……………… Nxh5
23 Qd5
23……………… Qe3
24 Raf1
24……………… Ng3+
25 Kg2
25……………… Qxe4
26 Qd4
26……………… Kg8
27 Kxg3
27……………… Qg6+
28 Kh2
28……………… c6
29 Nh4
29……………… Qh5
30 Kg1
30……………… Qg5+
31 Rg2
31……………… Qe5
32 Qf2
32……………… Qc5
33 Nf5
33……………… Qxf2+
34 Rfxf2
34……………… g6
35 Nxd6
35……………… Rd8
36 Nf7
36……………… Rd7
37 Nxh8
37……………… Kxh8
38 Rd2
38……………… Rf7
39 Rd8+
39……………… Kg7
40 Rgd2
40……………… Rf5
41 R8d7+
41……………… Kh6
42 b4
42……………… Rf3
43 Rxb7
43……………… Rxc3
44 Rh2+
44……………… Kg5
45 Rhxh7
45……………… c5
46 b5
46……………… axb5
47 Rxb5
47……………… Kf4
48 a6
48……………… Rc1+
49 Kg2
49……………… Rc2+
50 Kf1
50……………… Ra2
51 a7
51……………… Ra1+
52 Ke2
52……………… Ra2+
53 Kd3
53……………… g5
54 Rb8
54……………… g4
55 a8=R
55……………… Rxa8
56 Rxa8
56……………… g3
57 Rg8
57……………… g2
58 Rxg2
58……………… Kf5
59 Rf2+
59……………… Ke5
60 Rh5+
60……………… Ke6
61 Rh6+
61……………… Ke7
62 Kc4
62……………… Kd7
63 Rf7+
63……………… Ke8
64 Rhh7
64……………… Kd8
65 Rf8#

Yes, White won.

Bottom line: It's a great book alright, but it was written back in the days when computers comprised a room full of vacuum tubes, and had maybe 1 KB of memory (less than enough to hold just my Amazon review here). Chernev, like every other author of his time, plus and minus several decades, had no access to a "Grand Master in his pocket" like my handy dandy Droid phone. And he, like von Scheve in this game, were a little too awed by even great masters like Teichmann.

But now we know better. It's a whole new world.

Game on!

: )
Lanin
What a wonderful concept! Every move is commented on. And, Chernev started it all with Dr. Nunn writing, "Understanding Chess" for the advance player and the Chess for Jrs. Series writing "Unbeatable and More Unbeatable Chess For Jrs." for the Advanced Beginner and Intermediate Player.

My only two complaints are that this book is outdated and it gets rather boring when in each game there must be a comment for the same previously played opening move - both which the other books have taken care of.

Over all a very good book with a couple small flaws.