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Download Getting Started with Lego Trains epub book
ISBN:1593270062
Author: Jacob H. McKee
ISBN13: 978-1593270063
Title: Getting Started with Lego Trains
Format: lit azw lrf docx
ePUB size: 1128 kb
FB2 size: 1740 kb
DJVU size: 1743 kb
Language: English
Publisher: No Starch Press; 1 edition (December 2003)
Pages: 128

Getting Started with Lego Trains by Jacob H. McKee



Jacob McKee, the author, is webmaster at Bricks On The Brain, a good site which acts as a portal to build instructions. Both the book and the site itself promise at least a couple of articles by McKee but these are still "to come. There are still some useful nuggets such as the 'Studs Not On Top' technique for getting bricks pointing away from the vertical and interesting trivia such as a short history of Lego trains.

Here's everything you need to know to build LEGO® trains, from setting up train tracks to building custom freight cars. Veteran LEGO® trains fanatics and curious beginners alike will find this book the easiest way to get started with LEGO® trains. JACOB H. MCKEE is a well-known figure in the LEGO trains community and the LEGO Community Development Manager for North America. He has been building LEGO creations since he was a young bo. .

Sure to be an essential reference for experienced LEGO train builders, Getting Started with LEGO Trains is also for LEGO train novices who want to get started with this creative hobby. Getting Started with LEGO Trains begins with the fundamentals of LEGO trains: setting up the track and electrical components.

1/9 21. Personal Name: McKee, Jacob H. Publication, Distribution, et. San Francisco. No Starch Press, (c)2003. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Getting started with LEGO trains, Jacob H. McKee.

An Unofficial Guide to the world of Lego Trains. Great introductions for beginners to advance techniques such as SNOT (studs-not-on-top). LEGO Lap Tray Table Carrying Case Travel Base Plates Storage W/Legos. Lego- Lego Trains, Getting Started With Lego Trains Book. Getting Started With LEGO Trains ~ Jacob H. McKee ~ 2004 ~ EXCELLENT CON. Thanksgiving 1973 Beautiful RARE 1 Troy O.

They're based on the Old-Style Refrigerator Car in Getting Started with LEGO Trains by Jacob H. McKee (a wonderful book). Check out Jake McKee's Brickshelf for some additional inspiration. Jake's the author of Getting Started with LEGO Trains and has some great rolling stock. zephyr1934's Brickshelf also has some great boxcars.

THE LEGO® TRAINS BOO. nternational variants. Based on the English version futher translations showed up on various markets, . Spain, Italy and (upcomming) Russia. The LEGO Trains Book English version published by No Starch Press. Holger Matthes: Frauenkirche Dresden. Re-built and built with LEGO. private photo book), 2006, German and English. Holger Matthes: Modellbau mit LEGO. Holger Matthes: Modellbau mit LEGO (private photo book), 2010, German. Die Sucht hat 8 Noppen.

My own tattered copy of Jake McKee’s Getting Started With LEGO Trains. In all, I have to give this book a 10/10 score. There was not a detail that was skipped over. This is certainly the new Getting Started With LGEO Trains, without any doubt. The instructions may be for foreign (to me) models, but they offer a lot, not to mention the countless other photos and well-written paragraphs full of useful stuff. I would recommend this book to anyone, even myself.

The first and only in-depth reference to building LEGO trains.

Here's everything you need to know to build LEGO® trains, from setting up train tracks to building custom freight cars. LEGO insider, Jacob H. McKee, shares some of his most fascinating and original train designs, while including descriptive articles on basic building techniques, plus high-quality building instructions for several different projects. Veteran LEGO® trains fanatics and curious beginners alike will find this book the easiest way to get started with LEGO® trains.

JACOB H. MCKEE is a well-known figure in the LEGO trains community and the LEGO Community Development Manager for North America. Jacob has worked on more than 400 websites and countless community projects, including the official LEGO® Trains website www.lego.com/trains. He has been building LEGO creations since he was a young boy.

Reviews: 7
Mogelv
Just what I was looking for, a comprehensive guide for Lego rail fans.
Zargelynd
This book is was printed while the LEGO 9V was still around. That's no longer the case with LEGO releasing RC trains. I would like the book to have more examples of locomotives and train cars to build. Right now there are only four intructions for building your own. I would look forward to a second edition. Overall, there isn't a better book out there, however, this is all we have. It's good, but not great.
Chuynopana
I have a confession to make. There is one small part of my childhood that is constantly returning; every few years it breaks out and I find my apartment covered in small pieces of brightly coloured plastic: Yes, the Lego addiction strikes. One of those recent episodes involved a train set (perhaps I indulged in a few pieces of track and an extra car or two - but that's all, I swear.

Getting Started with Lego Trains is a fairly good guide to designing and building Lego trains. The writing is a clear, simple style that should be understood by anyone, the layout is clear.

Jacob McKee, the author, is webmaster at Bricks On The Brain, a good site which acts as a portal to build instructions. He also has a section devoted to the book which has three example pages and some links to other sites useful to Lego train builders. Both the book and the site itself promise at least a couple of articles by McKee but these are still "to come." I hope they come soon as McKee promises (in the book and on the site) an article on using decals and I'd like to know his sources and methods.

The book starts with two chapters that are absolutely basic; most of the information here is included in the Lego documentation you get with the train kits, such as how to hook up the electrical power and the different train and carriage sets available. There are still some useful nuggets such as the 'Studs Not On Top' technique for getting bricks pointing away from the vertical and interesting trivia such as a short history of Lego trains. McKee also adds some details that may be hard to glean from the Lego manuals such as how an active passing line can cause a short circuit in your track.

The third chapter is only two pages, which once again detail some fairly obvious information such as the various parts of the train couplings and bogies. From that point on, the book gets interesting. The real core of the book consists of the three chapters that McKee has devoted to three different train models. Instead of just giving you the plans to build the locomotive and two carriages, McKee has shared the design process itself and gives some useful design and building tips before showing you the instructions.

The first model is a glorious model of a GP-38 locomotive (if you want to see the finished models then you can get decent-sized pictures on McKee's site). It might have been better to have had this model last of the three, as it is the most complex and I found it the hardest to make with my Lego collection - there are more specialized parts in this model and I had to change the design in a couple of spots. Given the great look of the finished model, this isn't too much of a complaint.

The second example is a refrigerated car (or "reefer car" in train yard slang). I found that I couldn't build this car in the all-green of the book design but had the parts to build it in red. Since, as McKee points out, these sorts of cars are to be found in dozens of different paint jobs I don't feel this was a problem. There are considerably fewer specialized parts in this model.

The third example is a container car (with containers), which is the easiest to build and uses few specialized pieces you are unlikely to have if you own a train set already. Once again my only real problem was one of having exactly the same colour as the book -- one of my containers has red doors instead of white, for example.

I hope from my descriptions of the chapter you can see why I think the model order is wrong -- I'd completely reverse the order of these three chapters.

For an early teen (or older) reader, the strength of this book is the tips and encouragement McKee gives in these three chapters for designing your own locomotives and carriages. There are dozens of little tips and tricks on creating a visually pleasing and playable model design. Younger readers may not appreciate McKee's excellent advice on creating your own designs as much as older readers, but they will enjoy building the models all the same.

There is a final chapter on building track layouts, including some useful tips on building track inclines, and finally two short appendices, one on where to buy Lego and a glossary (McKee labels it "terminology").

Originally (before publication, that is), this book was advertised at $24.95. The actual cover price is $19.95, though, and No Starch have dropped the price again. At the new list of $14.95, it becomes much more attractive and I recommend it to anyone who is interested in designing and building their own Lego train locomotives and carriages. The readable, simple style and clear build instructions make it enjoyable for quite young readers and older, more dedicated builders will appreciate the design tips. Lego have train sets that they advise are for 8 years old or older, and I believe the average seven-year-old would have no problem understanding the build instructions in this book.
MOQ
Buy this book for the fabulous building instructions alone! Amidst the pages of this well-written overview of LEGO trains are instructions for an impressively detailed diesel locomotive, a refrigerator car and an intermodal container car.
Whether you are new to LEGO model railroading or are a traditional model railroader wondering if LEGO trains are more than a toy, this book is impressive.
McKee will walk you through the history of LEGO model trains, make some comparisons to traditional model railroading, introduce you to LEGO train-building terminology, review setup and maintenance, and then pour on the building instructions. To wrap things up, McKee includes a chapter on track plans, changing track elevation, and then concludes with a list of resources designed to help you expand your LEGO hobby.
Getting Started With LEGO Trains is a must have book for both railroad and LEGO fans everywhere.
Voodoosida
The book is well made, with good construction (which is important, since you'll be using the model instructions in the book regularly). I like that they color-coded the background of each section, making it easy to find the instructions.
The book is a good extension ot the authros website, and the three models are good examples of "prototype" train stock, as well as being good illustrations for building techniques being explained (such as studs-not-on-top, and color detailing).
I agree with the 12+ rating for this book, because I think some of the vocabulary may be too advanced for some younger readers on their own. But, it could be a good book for a youngster to share with an older sibling or Adult Fan Of LEGO.
Besides modeling tips, there is a lot of experience shared with the readers, as well as useful web pointers.
I enjoyed this book (and the models), and I recommend it.
Agantrius
This is an excellent overview of the fun that can be had with LEGO Trains. Jake McKee is well known within the community of Adult Fans of LEGO as a train afficionado, and he's done a nice job of giving an overview of the general principles that LEGO trains work under. The book covers track design, train terminology, and other tidbits; several chapters are devoted to step-by-step instructions for a locomotive and articulated container cars. It'd be an excellent gift for a young person (or not so young) just getting their first LEGO train set; it's also a nice companion for someone who then turns to the Internet for the many LEGO train sites and clubs (start at [...] to find these). Either way, it's a book that's worth your time and money!
Loni
This book delivers pretty much what you would expect.

The first part covers some general background on the Lego 9V train system (if you are looking for info on the newer RC stuff, this book is not for you). The second part gives detailed building instructions for some cars and an engine. The last chapter gives some track layout ideas. The book is written in a very to-the-point style and very well illustrated.

The projects suggested are very nice, though it might be hard finding some of the parts Jake suggests using.

The only reason I didn't give this book five stars is that it leaves me wanting more.....