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Download It Don't Worry Me: The Revolutionary American Films of the Seventies epub book
ISBN:057121486X
Author: Ryan Gilbey
ISBN13: 978-0571214860
Title: It Don't Worry Me: The Revolutionary American Films of the Seventies
Format: doc lrf lit mbr
ePUB size: 1955 kb
FB2 size: 1420 kb
DJVU size: 1400 kb
Language: English
Category: Movies
Publisher: Faber & Faber; First Edition edition (June 1, 2003)
Pages: 256

It Don't Worry Me: The Revolutionary American Films of the Seventies by Ryan Gilbey



It Don't Worry Me book.

Granted, I am already a fervent fan of the "Raging Bulls-Easy Riders" Seventies filmmakers, the era when American Cinema flourished- and yet Gilbey's work brought me fresh, witty insight into the works. The author is a master of the succinct summation that captures a detail in the films you might overlook, even with repeated viewings, plus the book is great fun to read. It's a perfect balance of scholarship and entertainment, with just enough potentially divisive opinion making to keep you plunging ahead to finish a chapter.

It Don't Worry Me" celebrates the enduring genius of the time by scrutinizing the work of ten directors who were prominent-or promising-in that uniquely creative decade and their contributions to this cinematic uprising.

Book Description A close look at the maverick filmmakers of the seventies-from Scorsese and Coppola to Spielberg and Lucas-who forever altered the landscape of cinema The 1970s were a landmark era in American film, during which a cadre of young directors.

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I Heart The Seventies AND this book. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago. It's refreshing (and rare) when a film critic understands that movies are more than an extension of literature and theater. I love that he writes so deeply and intelligently about "Alice Doesn't Live.

Ryan Gilbey now looks afresh at the remarkable movies of this era, and their gifted makers. Today these directors are sometimes lambasted as sell-outs or burn-outs, but their best films of the Seventies - from American Graffiti to The Conversation, Nashville to Carrie, Badlands to Taxi Driver - still feel as urgent and innovative as they did on first release, and still inspire young film-makers at a time when movies are once more depressingly formulaic. These directors cultivated a fascinating eclecticism, driven by creative hunger and insatiable imagination

It Don’t Worry Me celebrates the enduring genius of the time by scrutinizing the work of ten directors who were prominent-or promising-in that uniquely creative decade and their contributions to this cinematic uprising. The writer of It Don't Worry Me: The Revolutionary American Films of the Seventies content conveys the thought easily to understand by most people. The printed and e-book are not different in the articles but it just different in the form of it.

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Описание: Book DescriptionA close look at the maverick filmmakers of the seventies-from Scorsese and Coppola to Spielberg and Lucas-who forever altered the landscape of cinemaThe 1970s were a landmark era in American film, during which a cadre of young directors emerged wh. .

A close look at the maverick filmmakers of the seventies—from Scorsese and Coppola to Spielberg and Lucas—who forever altered the landscape of cinemaThe 1970s were a landmark era in American film, during which a cadre of young directors emerged who would effectively slay the old Hollywood and become royalty in the new. It Don’t Worry Me celebrates the enduring genius of the time by scrutinizing the work of ten directors who were prominent—or promising—in that uniquely creative decade and their contributions to this cinematic uprising. While Francis Ford Coppola was taking Hollywood by the horns, George Lucas and Steven Spielberg were fashioning the first blockbusters, and Martin Scorsese was marrying old-school movie glamour to a savvy street edginess; Woody Allen forged an irreverent vocabulary for film comedy; Brian De Palma shot delirious horror comedies that trapped audiences between laughter and terror; Stanley Kubrick and Terrence Malick labored over austere dramas that challenged viewers’ expectations; and Robert Altman rattled off fourteen movies in the space of ten years, several of them masterpieces, most of them a miniature revolution in their own right. Meanwhile, on the sidelines, a young buck named Jonathan Demme kick started his career with a series of snappy comedies and thrillers.More than just a tribute to past glory, though, It Don’t Worry Me takes a close look at the work of these filmmakers with a contemporary eye, discovering an urgency and innovation still resonant today.
Reviews: 3
YSOP
Writers like this have some interesting insights into films they discuss, however its overshadowed by a lot of opinionated, assumptive, self impressed and self congratulatory ''witty''(?) drivel, awaiting applause as they drool over themselves; they are no help to the world of art nor the artists they ''critique'' in the least. He seems to think he knows Coppola’s innermost thoughts, putting himself now in the class of “soothsayer” as well as his obvious opinion of himself as “brilliant critic.” At first i thought this writer was a sophomoric high school-er, whose early comment about John Cazale's looks, (as if his opinion on that is of any interest, other than to reveal an immature superficiality), was insultingly derogatory, to say the least, especially given the relevance of Cazale's widespread respect by peers for his acting talent. So called ''critics'' this should take Goddard's advice who said the way to criticize a movie is to ''make one yourself''..i doubt whether this writer has ever even picked up a camera. Writers like this offer nothing to the world of cinema, their sole purpose being only to show the reader how impressed they are with themselves and their own narcissism.
Cerar
It's refreshing (and rare) when a film critic understands that movies are more than an extension of literature and theater. Most critics merely review the screenplay and the acting, but Ryan Gilbey obviously appreciates all of the elements that go into filmmaking, from the visual compositions to the lighting, editing and art direction to the psychological sense of space to the aural textures and everything in between. I love that he writes so deeply and intelligently about "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore," a Scorcese masterpiece that is usually ignored. As a teenager in the seventies, I watched that movie a dozen times, fascinated by the tiny details that Gilbey brilliantly explores. With the recent revival in seventies cinema worship, I was afraid there was nothing left to say on the subject. But Gilbey brings a sharp probing eye and intriguing new insight to the films he discusses. He dares to tackle DePalma without going on and on about the obvious Hitchcock nods. He gives "American Grafitti" the full credit it deserves as a truly groundbreaking work of cinematic layering that predates Robert Altman's "Nashville." He ingeniously points out that "The Godfather" might not have earned its classic status without the superimpositions of "Godfather 2". He presents compelling theories as to why Peter Bogdanovich and William Friedkin never lived up to their early successes. He reminds us how innovative "Annie Hall" was at the time, how interesting Jonathan Demme can be, and how complex Terrence Malick films are. My only complaint: Sometimes it's obvious that Gilbey was just a baby when these films were released (he seems to assume that DePalma was well-respected/received during that era, etc.) but it's nice to know the films can still work their magic after all these years. I wish he had written more about the directors' later films but I guess that's another book. At least he mentions them briefly, and also tips his hat to the new wave of auteurs like Wes Anderson, David Lynch, etc. Personally, I believe we are living in a new Golden Age of Cinema that rivals the seventies. Since the late nineties, the "indies" have given us so many new interesting directors and eccentric visions that it's hard for the average filmgoer to keep up with them all. Maybe the talented Ryan Gilbey will turn his critical lens on the last ten years of moviemaking for his next book -- and blow away all those boring critics who can't stop reviewing movies as if they're writing book reports for English class.
Winail
Granted, I am already a fervent fan of the "Raging Bulls-Easy Riders" Seventies filmmakers, the era when American Cinema flourished- and yet Gilbey's work brought me fresh, witty insight into the works. The author is a master of the succinct summation that captures a detail in the films you might overlook, even with repeated viewings, plus the book is great fun to read. It's a perfect balance of scholarship and entertainment, with just enough potentially divisive opinion making to keep you plunging ahead to finish a chapter. There is an obvious debt to Pauline Kael but Gilbey's fresh perspective on the era (due to his youth) lends the analysis more insight and depth than Kael. It's a shame this book isn't getting more distribution. The author needs a better publicist in the US! Keep writing, Mr. Gilbey! A new generation needs your writing to remind them of what they're missing at the soulless multiplexes of today!