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ISBN:0452275067
Author: Kim Wilson Brandt,Philip J. Cunningham
ISBN13: 978-0452275065
Title: Zakennayo!: The Real Japanese You Were Never Taught in School
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ePUB size: 1151 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humor
Publisher: Plume (November 1, 1995)
Pages: 128

Zakennayo!: The Real Japanese You Were Never Taught in School by Kim Wilson Brandt,Philip J. Cunningham



Gavin said: I can't say I learned very much from this book that I didn't already know  . Ten years ago I could have had a ton of fun with this book. The direct style is a welcome relief from the sanctimonious cultural propaganda found in most Japanese textbooks. It's kind of a pity it only uses roman script, as anyone using these expressions has probably learned their way around some kana. Still, it's a fun read to pass away an hour or tw I can't say I learned very much from this book that I didn't already know. There's even less that is much use for a minivan-driving father of two. Ten years ago I could have had a ton of fun with this book

Zakennayo!: The Real Japanese You Were Never Taught in School. by Philip J. Cunningham, Kim Wilson Brandt (Illustrations). November 1st 1995 by Plume.

Cunningham Philip J. Издательство: Penguin Group. repertoire of "colorful" Japanese expressions.

Philip J. Cunningham. Zakennayo!: The Real Japanese You Were Never Taught in School. Cunningham and Kim Wilson Brandt. Book Depository Books With Free Delivery Worldwide. Box Office Mojo Find Movie Box Office Data. ComiXology Thousands of Digital Comics.

Zakennayo" is very much a real phrase known to anyone who has studied basic Japanese. It's a contraction of the phrase "Fuzakeru na yo" which means something along the lines of "Don't mess with me". If you are Japanese you most certainly have heard it by the age of 5. 0. Report. Zakennayo is a refreshing romp through Tokyo in the disguise of a book about slang. It's delightfully politically uncorrect and pokes fun at nearly everyone, from gaijin adventurers to the gatekeepers of Japan's insular culture. A fun read for a rainy day or any day in Japan. Manufacturer: Plume Release date: 1 November 1995 ISBN-10 : 0452275067 ISBN-13: 9780452275065.

Cunningham and his sketch artist, Brandt, engage students who’ve slogged their way through the typical formal Japanese texts with some in-your-face, real, downright inappropriate Japanese. The focus here is street culture – sex, stereotypes, alcohol and cursing.

The Real Japanese You Were Never Taught in School by Philip J. Cunningham, Kim Wilson Brandt, Kim Wilson Eversz, Philipj Cunningham Paperback, 128 Pages, Published 1995 by Plume ISBN-13: 978-0-452-27506-5, ISBN: 0-452-27506-7.

by Kim Wilson Brandt, Phillip J. Cunningham, Kim W. Eversz.

Scheisse: The Real German You Were Never Taught in School by Gertrude Besserwisser. Zakennayo! by Philip J. Translate Series Title. Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher. Avoid series that cross authors, unless the authors were or became aware of the series identification (e. avoid lumping Jane Austen with her continuators). Also avoid publisher series, unless the publisher has.

The Japanese are known for their polite discourse and deferential demeanor, but there's another side to the language of the land of the rising sun--and every one of its biting curses, scathing slanders, and frustration-venting expressions is captured here in this priceless repertoire of "colorful" Japanese expressions. 16 line drawings.
Reviews: 7
Chilldweller
I saw this book a while ago in bookstore and didn't purchase it. I finally tracked it down on amazon and the price was perfect for such an enlightening and entertaining book! Illustrations and Japanese and English translated dialogue make it fun for anybody interested in Japanese language and culture a midst the young adult lifestyle in in Japan. It has a variety of slang words and truths about foreigners in Japan. Any young person planning a trip to Japan would get a kick out of this book. This book doesn't teach the basics of Japanese but is meant to add color to your Japanese speaking. :D Any student of Japanese would most likely find this book ridiculous, yet infectiously entertaining. I definitely recommend it to young adult audience rather than teen because of sexual themes and language.
Melipra
The book is outdated... but it is a great book, one of the best! The characters are spot on. This was the first Japanese language slang book i bought back in 1997, when I first started studying Japanese language. The only real knock (and the reason I gave it four stars) is that the whole thing is in romaji. I really hate romaji most days, because it makes me pronounce the word wrong if I'm not careful - watch out for words with "a" in them. The book needs to be updated, as far as including kanji/furigana/hirigana -- but that's about it. The illustrations are great as well, they catch the avarice and sheisty-ness that people living in a country obsessed with the concepts of tatemae/honne/mie know so well. The ending of this book is all too true! This is exactly how it works... again, one of the best books of the genre.
Ueledavi
It is a funny collection of stories about some foreigners in Japan, Kenny is an American English Teacher, Nigel is a British news writer, and Sharon is an Australian hostess. In Japan, they are simply gaijin. Taro is a Japanese-American who is gaijin as well, but he doesn't look like the others, so he is never called gaijin. I have lived in Japan for about 3 years, and I can say that there are many similar stories that happen in Japan every day. I have read this book twice, and these stories made me laugh too much.

However, many of the terms used in this book are outdated and the dialect used is "adequate" only in Tokyo, and truly obscene.

A Japanese friend who is from Hokkaido and lives in Nagoya doesn't understand some of the words used in this book.

As I have said, this book actually doesn't improve your vocabulary, unless you want to be a Yakuza in Tokyo, but as other reviewer said maybe it encourage yourself to learn more Japanese because it presents many truly stories that happen even today.

They are 12 stories:

-Alien Invaders.

-The ABC's of Japanese.

-Street Jive.

-Waiting at Hachiko.

-Talking about people.

-The gay life.

-Hookers and Gangsters.

-Disco City.

-Foreign Drinking Holes.

-After Hours.

-Romance and Low life.

-Talking about Sex.

The dialogues are presented first in Romaji, followed by their English translations, and there is a vocabulary list at the end of each story. I gave it 4 stars because I consider it much better than "Japanese Street Slang", both are outdated, but "Zakennayo" is much more humorous and easier to read.
Uyehuguita
well this one is not one I'm fond of.. i only read it for like 30 minutes.. i think that perhaps a 13 year old boy might be interested in this book but not me.. i really don't think i want to speak nihongo in such a tacky manner.. which is weird because i swear like a sailor in english.. i think i want to have a bit more class than that when i speak japanese.. it might be mildly entertaining to read on an airplane..

all and all its awful.. i bought it for 3$ and ended up giving it to a library..
Gugrel
This book is for English speakers struggling with learning Japanese and want a comic book to stimulate some interest in continued learning. The slang is out dated and mostly likely used a few decades ago. The converse would be a Japanese coming to the USA speaking like Austin Powers, "Groovy Baby!" Naturally proper etiquette requires you would not speak such words in civilized company. As in the USA using out of date slang is most likely going to result in you getting laughed at, beat up or a combination of both. I say buy the book for a few good laughs and encourage yourself to learn more Japanese. I recommend Barrons CD set although it too is a little dated and when the Japanese women narrators speak they are almost inaudible.
Umsida
I read this after my first year of Japanese study. I would not recommend using any of the terms or phrases discussed in this book without first bouncing them off a few native Japanese speakers. I suggest this because you run the risk of sounding like a total fool if you try some of these phrases out on strangers. Problems: First, the author does not point out that many of the phrases used in the book would only be used by women or school girls (if you want to appear effeminate, use these terms recklessly). In addition to this, many of the expressions discussed are terribly outdated. Finally, several of my Japanese friends told me that they had never heard the word "Zakennayo" before. To be fair they did tell me that the term might be from a dialect they were unfamiliar with. However, I think they were just being polite. Anyway, please don't take my opinions and experiences with this book as gospel. I'm in my third year of Japanese study, so I'm no way near fluent. Rather, go to any well known internet search engine any type "Zakennayo" in. Be sure to take note of the number of hits you obtain. Now type in an equivalent term in English, German, French, Spanish, or any other European language you may be familiar with. Compare the number of hits. Well, this was fun, Thanks for listening.
Yananoc
Zakennayo is a refreshing romp through Tokyo in the disguise of a book about slang. It's delightfully politically uncorrect and pokes fun at nearly everyone, from gaijin adventurers to the gatekeepers of Japan's insular culture. A fun read for a rainy day or any day in Japan.