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ISBN:0691152535
Author: Winnifred Fallers Sullivan
ISBN13: 978-0691152530
Title: Prison Religion: Faith-Based Reform and the Constitution
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ePUB size: 1471 kb
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Language: English
Category: World
Publisher: Princeton University Press; Reprint edition (September 26, 2011)
Pages: 320

Prison Religion: Faith-Based Reform and the Constitution by Winnifred Fallers Sullivan



Sullivan, Winnifred Fallers, 1950-. Publication, Distribution, et. Princeton On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Prison religion : faith-based reform and the constitution, Winnifred Fallers Sullivan.

Prison Religion: Faith Based Reform and the Constitution by Winnifred Fallers Sullivan is an analysis of a 2005 court case in Des Moines, Iowa involving the InnerChange Freedom Initiative (IFI). The book looks at the challenges of the separation of church and state, and faith-based programs inside government funded social services. The lawsuit was brought against IFI by Americans United for Separation of Church and State (AU). The book opens by briefly explaining the arguments of religious freedoms and the First Amendment

After ten years of public policy promoting the greater integration of faith-based organizations into the ranks of government funded social service providers, the nature and role of faith in this effort remains elusive. In December 2006, in Des Moines, Iowa, a .

In Prison Religion, law and religion scholar Winnifred Fallers Sullivan takes up these and other important questions through a close examination of a 2005 lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a faith-based residential rehabilitation program in an Iowa state prison.

By Winnifred Fallers Sullivan. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009. Cradling the Sacred: Image, Ritual, and Affect in Mexican and Mesoamerican Material Religion.

1. The Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment has not found much traction in prison religion cases, despite the United States Supreme Court's holding otherwise in Cruz v. Beto (1972). Apparently, this is because of the courts' over-reliance on the fact that religious practices in various religions are not the same. Consequently, they have not extended Equal Protection to address equity among religious accommodations in prisons (yet). Recommend this journal. Create a SciFeed alert for new publications. With following keyword. Princeton University.

Sullivan, Winnifred Fallers. Faith-Based Reform and the Constitution. Princeton university press. Prison Religion is a remarkable and illuminating book. -Michael Warner, Yale.

Implicit Religion, Vol 14, No 3 (2011). Reading Tools Drummond. All Authors Title Abstract Index terms Full Text.

More than the citizens of most countries, Americans are either religious or in jail--or both. But what does it mean when imprisonment and evangelization actually go hand in hand, or at least appear to? What do "faith-based" prison programs mean for the constitutional separation of church and state, particularly when prisoners who participate get special privileges? In Prison Religion, law and religion scholar Winnifred Fallers Sullivan takes up these and other important questions through a close examination of a 2005 lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a faith-based residential rehabilitation program in an Iowa state prison.

Americans United for the Separation of Church and State v. Prison Fellowship Ministries, a trial in which Sullivan served as an expert witness, centered on the constitutionality of allowing religious organizations to operate programs in state-run facilities. Using the trial as a case study, Sullivan argues that separation of church and state is no longer possible. Religious authority has shifted from institutions to individuals, making it difficult to define religion, let alone disentangle it from the state. Prison Religion casts new light on church-state law, the debate over government-funded faith-based programs, and the predicament of prisoners who have precious little choice about what kind of rehabilitation they receive, if they are offered any at all.