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ISBN:0805043810
Author: Orville Schell
ISBN13: 978-0805043815
Title: Virtual Tibet: Searching for Shangri-La from the Himalayas to Hollywood
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ePUB size: 1198 kb
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Language: English
Category: World
Publisher: Metropolitan Books; First Edition edition (May 17, 2000)
Pages: 368

Virtual Tibet: Searching for Shangri-La from the Himalayas to Hollywood by Orville Schell



In Virtual Tibet, Orville Schell, one of the preeminent experts on modern China and Tibet, undertakes a strange and wondrous odyssey into our Tibetan fantasies. Meanwhile, back in Hollywood--the Dalai Lama became a cult figure for many of the figures of Filmistan. The cultural destruction of Tibet under Chinese rule came to the attention of many who previously could not have found Tibet on a map. In the 1990s, not one, but two movies were produced about Tibet--the film version of Heinrich Harrer's "Seven Years in Tibet" and "Kundun", more the story of the Dalai Lama.

The Dalai Lama meets The Player-from the Himalayas to Hollywood, a fantastic journey into the West's longstanding dream of Tibet. What has made remote. Schell begins with his first visit to the real Tibet in 1981, fills in his readers with relevant history and belief, then moves to Hollywood, where the Dalai Lama has become "a warmhearted, even cuddly religious icon. Schell meets and evaluates "self-styled Tibetan Buddhist in the Hollywood pantheon," from Richard Gere, who appears impressively dedicated, to Steven Seagal, who comes off here as secretive and egomaniacal and who claims to be a reincarnated lama

The Dalai Lama meets The Player-from the Himalayas to Hollywood, a fantastic journey into the West's longstanding dream of Tibet.

5 21. Personal Name: Schell, Orville. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Schell's father Orville Hickok Schell, J. was a prominent lawyer who headed the New York City Bar Association, chaired the human rights group Americas Watch from its founding in 1981 until his death in 1987, co-founded Helsinki Watch, forerunner to Human Rights Watch, and became the namesake of the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights at Yale Law School Schell attended Pomfret School in Pomfret, Connecticut, after which he attended Harvard University, leaving in 1960 after his junior year t. .Empire: Impressions of China (2004).

Schell was smitten early in life with yearnings for Tibet. He first made a disillusioning visit to Lhasa and then went to the Argentine Alps, where Hollywood was filming Heinrich Harrar's Seven Years in Tibet, the book that had ignited Schell's youthful imagination. But for all of its magical powers of enchantment, which included reproducing Lhasa in the Andes, Hollywood was not up to preserving the illusions of Tibet. To make matters worse, as filming began it was revealed that the Austrian Harrar, a sympathetic champion of Buddhism, had in fact been a dedicated Nazi and .

In Virtual Tibet, Orville Schell, one of the preeminent experts on modern China and Tibet, undertakes a strange and wondrous odyssey into our Tibetan fantasies. He recounts the spellbinding adventures of the Western explorers and spiritualists who for centuries were bent on reaching forbidden Tibet and the holy city of Lhasa. Simultaneously, Schell embarks on a parallel present-day journey from Beastie Boys' "Free Tibet" concerts to a re-creation of Lhasa in the high Argentine Andes - the extravagant set of Seven Years in Tibet, starring Brad Pitt.

Like many Europeans, they carried with them idealized and unrealistic views of Tibet, projecting, as Orville Schell remarks in his book Virtual Tibet, a fabulous skein of fantasy around this distant, unknown land. The Nazis’ dreams about Tibet derived directly from the ideas of the Vril and Thule societies, which had constructed an image of Tibet based on fantasies of the type made famous by Madame Blavatsky, Lobsang Rampa, and other mythologizers of Shangri-La.

Himalaya (2001), also known by the name "Caravan", is a fictional film about the real-life yak caravan between Tibet and the Dolpo region of Nepal that trades salt for grain. Directed by French film maker and photographer Eric Valli, it is a joint British production in a Tibetan dialect and subtitled English. It was nominated in 2002 for an Academy Award for best foreign film. Himilaya is shot in the Tibetan Dolpo region of Nepal

The Dalai Lama meets The Player-from the Himalayas to Hollywood, a fantastic journey into the West's longstanding dream of Tibet.What has made remote, mountainous Tibet and its only real celebrity, the Dalai Lama, so abidingly fascinating to the West? From Marco Polo's vision of Tibet as a land of enchanters to James Hilton's dream of Shangri-la in Lost Horizon, why have Westerners projected their yearnings onto that inaccessible place as onto no other corner on earth?In Virtual Tibet, Orville Schell, one of the preeminent experts on modern China and Tibet, undertakes a strange and wondrous odyssey into our Tibetan fantasies. He recounts the spellbinding tale of the Western adventurers, explorers, and spiritualists who for centuries were bent on reaching forbidden Tibet and the holy city of Lhasa. At the same time, Schell leads us on a riveting present-day journey from Hollywood dharma study groups and Beastie Boy "Free Tibet" concerts to a re-creation of Lhasa in the high Argentine Andes, which was the extravagant set of Seven Years in Tibet, starring Brad Pitt. As the past and the present, ancient customs and the superstar culture collide, Schell sheds light on the danger of blurring virtual and real worlds.A fabulous spectacle, peopled by celebrity Buddhists and Tibetan bonzes, Yak wranglers and high-powered publicists, Steven Seagal and the Dalai Lama, Virtual Tibet is an elegantly written work of extraordinary charm, power, and insight.
Reviews: 7
Marilbine
The love of the exotic lurks in many hearts and has for centuries. Some people, when told a place is closed, off limits, verboten, must go there at any cost. So it was with Tibet. But not only was Tibet far away, a blank spot on world maps, it had an aura of magic, mysticism, and mystery. Tibet---mysticism---the occult---spiritual life: these connections spread through the West and Russia like measles in a kindergarten. What a challenge, then, for the adventurers of this world. From the 1600s on, a certain kind of Westerners (missionaries, soldiers, explorers, mystics) yearned to reach Lhasa, the ultimate Forbidden City. Their efforts are well recorded by Orville Schell. Most of them failed, but returned with tall tales nonetheless. In 1904, the infamous Younghusband expedition ("Bayonets to Lhasa") battered its way to the Tibetan capital over the bodies of hundreds of Tibetans who had nothing to match machine guns. This was supposedly in aid of keeping the Russians out, but Younghusband was dead keen on getting there long before. Travel to Tibet, well into my own lifetime, was like a pilgrimage to "Otherness". Tibet, a real society, with deep socio-economic problems, a feudal system, was turned into "Virtual Tibet", a figment of Western imagination.

Meanwhile, back in Hollywood----the Dalai Lama became a cult figure for many of the figures of Filmistan. The cultural destruction of Tibet under Chinese rule came to the attention of many who previously could not have found Tibet on a map. In the 1990s, not one, but two movies were produced about Tibet----the film version of Heinrich Harrer's "Seven Years in Tibet" and "Kundun", more the story of the Dalai Lama. Since filming on site was out of the question due to politics, the former was filmed in Argentina starring Brad Pitt. Schell weaves an interesting tale, alternating between the story of Tibetan travellers and the production of the film. In the end, it seems that the film and real Tibet merged because the film brought the extinct version of Tibet back to life for Tibetan actors and film audiences everywhere. "...in the popular imagination of the West, the plight of the Tibetans....occupied against their will....has been added to the lure of Tibet as a mystical place of physical beauty and spiritual refinement." But haven't Westerners created "virtual Tibet" in order to improve the quality of our lives, to give hope that somewhere out there Shangri La really exists? Wasn't Heinrich Harrer an unreconstructed Nazi? Do we know much about real Tibet? These are very interesting questions because Tibet is not the only place, nor Tibetans the only people, to suffer "virtualization". I recommend this book if any of this interests you.
Lucam
"Virtual Tibet" is a sorely needed entry in American publication.
As a Mongolian Chinese American, it has pained me to see my fellow Americans presented with much delusion about Tibet by Hollywood. For one, the Free Tibet movement dismisses the existence of millions of real Tibetan minority people in central China. I have been quite despondent while watching the "Free Tibet" movement paint China into a mono-ethnic nation, thereby erasing any ethnic identity from the real minorities in central China.
Most of the American scholars focus on Tibet in studying this issue, but they totally ignore the real minorities in central China.
For my minority Chinese heritage, I wish to say this to a reviewer who compared the Tibet myth to Dr. King's dream: As far as I'm concerned, the Dalai Lama is not Dr. Martin Luther King. Dr. King had a dream for America. He helped all African Americans to gain self respect. He never forgot African Americans are all over the U.S. I don't see the Dalai Lama ever speak about how his fellow Tibetans in central China. They are swept under the carpet as the Tibet movement tries to convince the West that "Tibet was invaded", that "the Tibetans are a race distinct from the Chinese".
Ghandi wanted a whole India, not to split it.
The Free Tibet movement calls for ethnic segregation for the Tibet region under euphoric terms. It has built a great myth that sugarcoated Ethnic Segregation into supposed "freedom".
This movement is doomed because it does not have the support of real minorities in China. Just as most African Americans will not support a Black Nation, nor will most Europeans support an Aryan Nation, most minorities in China prefer a multiple ethnic nation.
What really matters is how America will fare at the end. The "Free Tibet" movement can hurt our nation. In the past, the Chinese people held a loving attitude toward the U.S., due to our saving China from the Japanese invasion during WWII. Now their feelings are changing. There is a great love for multiple ethnic culture in China. When we engage in "Free Tibet", many Chinese people are angry at the U.S. for wanting to split China.
In this new millennium when the Sino-American relationship is vital to world peace, Tibet has been a thorn in that relationship, and is an threat to world peace.
America may suffer decline in this century if we took the wrong direction on this issue. What's at stake is not what happens to Tibet. The Tibetans in China will have the ultimate say. What's at stake is what will happen to America as a result of helping the Tibet movement.
"Virtual Tibet" may be one of the most important books this year. It can help enlighten us how much of what we think of Tibet is but an illusion. I hope books like this will help call attention to a more realistic view on this issue.
It is sad to see how this book is being panned by the pro-Tibet campaign people, to the point of using phrases such as "communist party line" to attack a respected American scholar. McCarthism lives in Tibet movement. I'm not surprised. I've seen many Tibetan followers levy accusations of "communist" at anyone whose view does not promote their myth.
I do agree with the reviewer who says Tibet has colonized the West. How did the West allow this colonization? It shows a great weakness on the West's system to be manipulated so easily.
The real issue here is the West's need to save itself from Tibetan colonization. Reading Virtual Tibet may just be the first step.