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ISBN:0271018240
Author: Suzanne Selinger
ISBN13: 978-0271018249
Title: Charlotte von Kirschbaum and Karl Barth: A Study in Biography and the History of Theology (Penn State Series in Lived Religious Experience)
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ePUB size: 1799 kb
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Language: English
Category: World
Publisher: Penn State University Press; 1 edition (November 25, 1998)
Pages: 216

Charlotte von Kirschbaum and Karl Barth: A Study in Biography and the History of Theology (Penn State Series in Lived Religious Experience) by Suzanne Selinger



In the Shadow of Karl Barth: Charlotte Von Kirschbaum. Karl Barth: An Introductory Biography for Evangelicals. Suzanne Selinger is Theological Librarian and Associate Professor of Historical Theology at Drew University and author of Calvin Against Himself: An Inquiry in Intellectual History (1984).

Chalotte von Kirschbaum was introduced to Karl Barth and his writings in the early 1920's. By 1929 she was working full-time for Barth as a secretary and assistant preparing his lectures. In October 1929 she moved into the Barth household with Barth's wife and children to continue academic theological work, where she remained until 1966. Charlotte and Barth cowrote the Church Dogmatics and many other theological works while she resided in the Barth household, and Barth's children referred to her as "Aunt Lollo"  . Selinger, Suzanne (1998), Charlotte von Kirschbaum and Karl Barth: A Study in Biography and the History of Theology, Penn State University Press, ISBN 0-271-01824-0.

Fritz Barth was a theology professor and pastor and desired for Karl to follow his positive line of Christianity, which clashed with Karl's desire to receive a liberal protestant eduction. Karl began his student career at the university of Bern, and then transferred to the University of Berlin to study under Adolf von Harnack, and then transferred briefly to the University of Tübingen before finally in Marburg to study under Wilhelm Herrmann (1846-1922). From 1911 to 1921 he served as a Reformed pastor in the village of Safenwil in the canton. Charlotte Von Kirschbaum and Karl Barth: A Study in Biography and the History of Theology. pp. 1–. ISBN 978-0-271-01864-5. Archived September 27, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.

Penn State Series in Lived Religious Experience. Charlotte von Kirschbaum and Karl Barth. A Study in Biography and the History of Theology. Von Kirschbaum gave a series of lectures in 1949, published in the same year, on women in the perspective of Scripture, theology, and the church. In the three volumes of Barth's Church Dogmatics that deal with humankind, including the male-female relationship as the locus of the image of God, Barth cites von Kirschbaum's scholarship. The subject inevitably reflects upon their own relationship.

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University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998. Douglas R. Sharp (a1). Northern Baptist Theological Seminary.

A study of the relationship between Karl Barth and his assistant, Charlotte von Kirschbaum. Charlotte von Kirschbaum and Karl Barth is the first concentrated study of the collaboration of the towering theologian Karl Barth and his secretary and theological assistant for more than three decades, Charlotte yon Kirschbaum. Barth always maintained that he could not have produced his theological oeuvre without her. Von Kirschbaum was also his constant companion.

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This book is the first concentrated study of the collaboration of the towering theologian Karl Barth and his secretary and theological assistant for more than three decades, Charlotte von Kirschbaum. Von Kirshbaum was also his constant companion. Pennsylvania State University Press, 206 pages. Charlotte von Kirschbaum and Karl Barth: A Study in Biography and the History of Theology (9780271018645) by Suzanne Selinger.

Barth's Moral Theology: Human Action in Barth's Thought. Edinburgh: T&T Clark. A new and revisionist reading would argue that the later Karl Barth saw the existence of the eternal Trinity not as the ground and presupposition, but as the consequence of God's pre-temporal decision of election. A more traditionalist reading, on the other hand, as defended by this essay, denies that proposition. The texts adduced by the revisionists, it is argued, fail to make their case.

Charlotte von Kirschbaum and Karl Barth is the first concentrated study of the collaboration of the towering theologian Karl Barth and his secretary and theological assistant for more than three decades, Charlotte von Kirschbaum. Barth always maintained that he could not have produced his theological oeuvre without her. Von Kirschbaum was also his constant companion. Discussion of the two has long been aswirl in rumor and speculation, with regard both to their personal relationship and to von Kirschbaum’s part in Barth's theological achievement.

Drawing upon published and unpublished sources that include their own writings, the observations of contemporaries, and correspondence with people who knew them, Suzanne Selinger seeks to describe the collaboration in a multidimensional way. Von Kirschbaum gave a series of lectures in 1949, published in the same year, on women in the perspective of Scripture, theology, and the church. In the three volumes of Barth's Church Dogmatics that deal with humankind, including the male-female relationship as the locus of the image of God, Barth cites von Kirschbaum's scholarship. The subject inevitably reflects upon their own relationship. Moreover, it is just this subject—the anthropology of gender—that has been the source of the categorical rejection of Barth by many feminists.

The author—a Barthian, a feminist, and a trained historian—addresses the concerns of Barth's critics by agreeing deeply with them in part but also by insisting upon understanding Barth and von Kirschbaum contextually. This means biographically and in relation to early German feminism (a phenomenon little known in the English-speaking world), the intellectual movement known as dialogical personalism, and the background of everything Barth and von Kirschbaum wrote or thought in their work together: the steady, threatening growth of the Nazi state, World War II, and the postwar German situation.