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ISBN:0674854330
Author: J. L. Heilbron
ISBN13: 978-0674854338
Title: The Sun in the Church: Cathedrals as Solar Observatories
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ePUB size: 1731 kb
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Language: English
Category: World
Publisher: Harvard University Press; Second Printing edition (October 15, 1999)
Pages: 366

The Sun in the Church: Cathedrals as Solar Observatories by J. L. Heilbron



Between 1650 and 1750, four Catholic churches were the best solar observatories in the world. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. Publisher: Harvard University Press.

Between 1650 and 1750, four Catholic churches were the best solar observatories in the world. A tale of politically canny astronomers and card Between 1650 and 1750, four Catholic churches were the best solar observatories in the world. Descriptions of the meridian lines built in several cathedrals around Italy and France during this time period form the majority of the book, with in depth analysis of the various challenges each one faced along with their benefits and contributions to science. Built to fix an unquestionable date for Easter. Heilbron, upending common views of the Church's relationship to science after it condemned Galileo, shows that Rome handsomely supported astronomical studies, accepting the Copernican hypothesis as a fiction convenient for calculation.

John L. Heilbron - (J. L. Heilbron) is an American historian of science best known for his work in the history of physics and the history of astronomy.

Through much of the Scientific Revolution, between 1650 and 1750, Catholic churches were the best solar observatories in the world. Constructed initially to solve the pressing problem of providing an unquestionable date for Easter, the instruments that made the churches' observatories also threw light on the disputed geometry of the solar system. A tale of politically canny astronomers and cardinals with a taste for mathematics, The Sun in the Church explains the unlikely accomplishments of the Church-sponsored observers. It engagingly describes Galileo's political.

Solar eclipse at the Meridian line at . aria degli Angeli in Rome by Mario Catamo. The Sun in the Church: Cathedrals as Solar Observatories by . Heilbron is an extremely interesting book. Unfortunately, it is not easy to read. It contains both serious mathematics and serious history. If you have a hard time keeping track of the different meridiana mentioned in the book, this table may be useful.

L. Heilbron's remarkable book draws our attention to church users of a very different kind: early modern astronomers measuring the solar path to correct the shift of the ancient Julian calendar, and incidentally to confirm or refute details of the cosmic systems of Ptolemy, Copernicus, Tycho Brahe, and Kepler. In 1475 Toscanelli built the first church meridiana using Brunelleschi's dome at the cathedral of Florence. In the late sixteenth century Duke Cosimo I de Medici proposed to reform the Julian calendar, and his cartographer Egnatio Danti built instruments at Santa Maria Novella in Florence and at San Petronio in Bologna.

This book series seeks to highlight the multifaceted connections between the disciplines of mathematics and architecture, through the publication of monographs that develop classical and contempora ry mathematical themes – geometry, algebra, calculation, modelling. In this paper data of the total flux observations of the sun at lambda3. 2 cm obtained in the Nanjing University, Department of Astronomy, during the years 1980 - 1981 have been analysed.

Between 1650 and 1750, four Catholic churches were the best solar observatories in the world. Built to fix an unquestionable date for Easter, they also housed instruments that threw light on the disputed geometry of the solar system, and so, within sight of the altar, subverted Church doctrine about the order of the universe.

A tale of politically canny astronomers and cardinals with a taste for mathematics, The Sun in the Church tells how these observatories came to be, how they worked, and what they accomplished. It describes Galileo's political overreaching, his subsequent trial for heresy, and his slow and steady rehabilitation in the eyes of the Catholic Church. And it offers an enlightening perspective on astronomy, Church history, and religious architecture, as well as an analysis of measurements testing the limits of attainable accuracy, undertaken with rudimentary means and extraordinary zeal. Above all, the book illuminates the niches protected and financed by the Catholic Church in which science and mathematics thrived.

Superbly written, The Sun in the Church provides a magnificent corrective to long-standing oversimplified accounts of the hostility between science and religion.

Reviews: 7
Jeb
So much science in this book like real nitty gritty equations and instrument descriptions and detailed drawings. I get very much more than I bargained for and it took me months to finish. I had heard reference to this book in another book by Brother Guy of the Vatican Observatory and was expecting more a history of science overview level so if you go in knowing it is more literally a science book you will be better start than me. It really is fascinating once you get through the math or not if you love astronomy. The use of churches as astronomical devices is rich and varied and incredibly important. Really read in the interest of learning more about the storied history of Vatican and science being partners, not the adversaries that most Americans are wrongly taught, this didn't disappoint. It was just a much denser read than I had wanted or expected
Ariurin
Great book. Well researched. Author has a dry wit that can catch you off guard. I learned a lot of details about the development of the field of astronomy, early popes, and the relationship of the catholic church to science.
Eseve
Excellent book, I highly recommend it. Easy to read, though there are a few places that are technical, but overall it rounds out historical footnotes to religion and its place in astronomy. It is a great book for amateurs as well as professionals.
Marieann
Kakashkaliandiia
Very important topic. Not well presented, but important in any case.
Brannylv
Thanks
Painshade
Nice academic piece on the history of the Catholic Church's work on establishing the date of Easter, and how, ironically, that work ultimately supported heliocentic theories of planetary motion that The Church opposed. Fascinating history.
Uranneavo
It's a beautiful book; it's astronomy and history all together.Very well written.
Kind of a slow read, but very interesting stuff.