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ISBN:0719555892
Author: John Keay
ISBN13: 978-0719555893
Title: Last Post : The End of Empire in the Far East
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ePUB size: 1491 kb
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Language: English
Category: World
Publisher: John Murray Pubs Ltd; New Ed edition (March 31, 2000)
Pages: 400

Last Post : The End of Empire in the Far East by John Keay



John Keay has built up a reputation for writing a series of singular narrative histories dealing with Asia in relation to European imperialism as in this book or his history of the British East India Company ("The Honourable Company"), as well as more general histories of individual countries ("China" and "India"). John Keay (born 1941) is an English journalist and author specialising in writing popular histories about India and the Far East, often with a particular focus on their colonisation and exploration by Europeans. John Keay is the author of about 20 books, all factual, mostly historical, and largely to do with Asia, exploration or Scotland. His first book stayed in print for thirty years; many others John Keay (born 1941) is an English journalist and author specialising in writing popular histories about India and the Far East, often with a particular focus on their colonisation and exploration.

The book is really divided into three parts. The first part charts the initial contact of the various Empires with the Far East. It explains why the Portugese were displaced by the Dutch and how the Dutch attempted to keep their area of influence insulated from the other European powers. The British, of course, were relative late comers but the European politics of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars was a catalyst for the Royal Navy and the East India Company to make inroads into the region

This book is a major and wide-ranging re-assessment of Anglo-American relations in the Middle Eastern context. It analyses the process of ending of empire in the Middle East from 1945 to the Yom Kippur War of 1973. It demonstrates that, far from experiencing a ‘loss of nerve’.

The End of Britain’s Informal Empire: The Middle East. Writing in September 1945, Baron Altrincham declared in a Colonial Office memorandum on British policy in the Middle East that ‘as a funnel of communication between the western, eastern and southern peoples of the British Commonwealt. e cannot allow any other Power to dominate and must preserve for ourselves the maximum friendship and goodwill’. Thus far, this essay has illuminated the various ways in which the process of decolonization within the British Empire often ran counter to London’s desires and interests. In Asia, Britain was forced to concede Malaya and Singapore, despite the evident economic and strategic advantages the two territories provided. In the Middle East, Britain was usurped from its last remaining (and so vital) strategic hub by the compulsion of economic crisis.

This book is a major and wide-ranging re-assessment of Anglo-American relations in the Middle Eastern context. Far from tamely acquiescing in a transfer of power to the United States, as Ritchie Ovendale and others contend, British decision-makers robustly defended their regional interests well into the 1960s and even beyond.

John Stanley Melville Keay FRGS, widely known as John Keay, (pronounced 'Kay') is a British historian, journalist, radio presenter and lecturer specialising in popular histories of India, the Far East and China, often with a particular focus on their colonisation and exploration by Europeans. In particular, he is widely seen as a pre-eminent historian of British India  . In 1971 he gave up his correspondent's job to write his first book, Into India, which was published in 1973. Keay followed it with two volumes about the European exploration of the Western Himalayas in the 19th century: When Men and Mountains Meet (1977) and The Gilgit Game (1979). Last Post: The End of Empire in the Far East (John Murray 1997), ISBN 0-7195-5346-6. In particular, he is widely seen as a pre-eminent historian of British India The author of over some twenty-five books, he also writes regularly for a nu. .Awards and recognition. The professional recognition he has received has included the following:.

Last Post: The End Of Empire In The Far East. Keay has written a terrific book, but, to appreciate it, you have to know what it is and what it isn't. It's not a general history of the Middle East in the first half of the twentieth century, but rather a history of Western colonialism, or imperialism, in the Middle East during that time period.

As John Keay’s ambitious new book makes clea. hina’s history is intoxicatingly interesting and is sure to keep us on the edge of our geopolitical seats. Independent on Sunday. Absorbingly readable. John Keay’s books include ‘India Discovered’, ‘The Honourable Company’, ‘Last Post: The End of Empire in the Far East’, the two-volume ‘Explorers of the Western Himalayas’, ‘India: A History’, ‘The Great Arc’, ‘Sowing the Wind: The Seeds of Conflict in the Middle East’ and ‘Mad About the Mekong: Exploration and Empire in South East Asia’. He is married with four children, lives in Scotland, and is the co-author, with Julia Keay, of the ‘Collins Encyclopaedia of Scotland’. Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start overPage 1 of 1. This shopping feature will continue to load.

970444 22. Personal Name: Keay, John. Publication, Distribution, et. London On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Mad about the Mekong : exploration and empire in South-East Asia, John Keay.

John Keay's epic, expert study of the twenthieth-century demise of colonial rule in the Far East The names echo like the last long notes of a bugle call: Hiroshima, Dien Bien Phu, Tiananmen Square; MacArthur and Mountbatten; The Quiet American and Bridge over the River Kwai. In a twentieth-century welter of war, Depression and Communism four empires crumbled and the West was bundled out of the East. John Keay's acclaimed study of this imperial finale draws on contemporary sources ranging from Ho Chi Minh to Dirk Bogarde. The narrative swoops from the showpiece cities of Shanghai, Saigon and Manila to the tough backwaters of Borneo and the tinkling rice fields of Bali. Grandeur of treatment is matched by trenchant analysis; unexpected continuities are revealed; and to the interaction of West and East is traced the dynamism of the Far East today.
Reviews: 3
Gralinda
John Keay has built up a reputation for writing a series of singular narrative histories dealing with Asia in relation to European imperialism as in this book or his history of the British East India Company (The Honourable Company), as well as more general histories of individual countries (China and India). His books have formed, for me at least, an excellent introduction into the history of the East, and been a starting point for further enquiry into their variety of pasts.

Keay begins with a number of concise accounts of how the Empires that were to be lost were gained in the first place, before moving onto the end of formal imperialism in the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, ending up with the handing over of Hong Kong to China. His narrative gives the main facts, as well as a good deal of detail that is strongly flavoured by Keays keen eye for the oddities of Empire. He perhaps over indulges his interest in such characters as James Innes who complains of having "no time to read his bible" while smuggling opium into Fukien; or the Commissioner of Weihaiwei who shares his office with a number of imaginary friends including the "outrageous and improper" Mrs Walkinshaw, the Earl of Dumbarton, and (most intriguingly) "The Trouserless one". History no doubt has its funny moments, and its funny characters, but these anecdotes are just the tip of the iceberg as Keay wrings out the laughs at a furious rate, some of them are very funny, though there is an occasional flop. I ended up longing for a few pages of sober narrative and analysis; the history of the end of Empire in the Far East was after all no joke for many of those concerned.

One of the strengths of Keays book is the broad coverage of the French, American, and particularly the Dutch, and their Empires in the East, as well as the Japanese "co-prosperity sphere" of 1941-45. When I first read "Last Post" a number of years ago, I had little knowledge of the Dutch in Indonesia, nor of the brutal British attack on the town of Surabaya after WW2, nor of the use of Japanese troops in support of re-Imperialising the East in the same period, and the book awakened a curiosity regarding European Imperialism in the Far East. Re-reading it now, and while still appreciating the scope of the events related, I felt disappointed in the quality of Keays accompanying analysis which can be a bit slap dash, especially with regard to the French then American involvement in Vietnam.

In short, this isn't a bad place for a reader unfamiliar with the subject to start, if they can get through the relentless word-play, the excess of eccentrics, and the torrent of humour (which to be fair can raise a smile but ought to have been rationed) they will get a good general overview of events, accompanied with some less than spectacular analysis of what was going on. For the reader who has read a good deal of the subject already, Keays "Last Post" maybe a little beyond the joke, its certainly not his best work.
Quashant
I have to ask myself sometimes about the benefit of reading popular history of the type sold retail, and this book might be one of the reasons.

Sure, it's very entertaining and well-written and part of my reason for reading history is a form of distraction easier on my liver than Old Crow.

However, as a journalist, the author lays entirely too much stress on the antics of the usual bunch of adventurers and lunatics who fantasized, like Lansdale ("The Quiet American" who drummed up support for Diem's Catholic *regime* in South Vietnam in order to manufacture the support of American Catholics for the war), that they influenced policy.

The fact is that the West needed the markets and resources of the Far East more than the Far East needed the West and the result was the struggles of countless wacks and lunatics, and working folk, to create "colonialism".

Furthermore, the narrative comes to a perhaps premature end in 1997, with Prince Charles bidding adieu to Hong Kong. I say this because only six years later, after a sort of world colonialist half-time around the millennium year, the British and the Americans invaded Iraq in a paleo-colonialist fashion, basically for the oil.

Lenin may have been right. Economic forces, while not overdeterminate, force our hand into a colonialism which then appears to be a marginal matter of people like the original Brooke and other adventurers who've scuttled out of the home counties with trollops and debt-collectors in pursuit, and who embody the contradiction, that smallish Western European states of the 18th century were not in fact sustainable economies.

Today, the USA having deindustrialized during the fat years may not be sustainable either and the result is a new colonialism. Fortunately, East Asia is spared so far.

But we need to read these accounts with care. Tolstoy may have been right: personalities cannot influence great events, only ride the tiger.
Grarana
Keay provides an enthralling account of why and how the British, Dutch, French and American Empires developed in the Far East, especially in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Then he describes how each of these Empires unravelled in the few short years after WW II. The book provides fascinating insights of the differing techniques utilized to control (and divest) their respective Empires e.g. British vs. Dutch. Keay tells the whole complex story in a very readable, colorful way. This is a book that the reader will want to come back to re-enjoy in the future.