» » One God: Pagan Monotheism in the Roman Empire
Download One God: Pagan Monotheism in the Roman Empire epub book
ISBN:0521194164
Author: Stephen Mitchell,Peter Van Nuffelen
ISBN13: 978-0521194167
Title: One God: Pagan Monotheism in the Roman Empire
Format: rtf doc mbr doc
ePUB size: 1920 kb
FB2 size: 1279 kb
DJVU size: 1940 kb
Language: English
Category: World
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (June 7, 2010)
Pages: 250

One God: Pagan Monotheism in the Roman Empire by Stephen Mitchell,Peter Van Nuffelen



This book discusses pagan monotheism in its philosophical and intellectual context, traces the evolution of new religious ideas in the time of the Roman empire, and evaluates the usefulness of the term 'monotheism' as a way of understanding these developments in later antiquity outside the context of Judaism and Christianity. In doing so, it establishes a new framework for understanding the relationship between polytheistic and monotheistic religious cultures between the first and fourth centuries AD. Скачать (pdf, . 1 Mb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

Topics Monotheism, God, theology, Jew, Roman Empire. Collection folkscanomy history; folkscanomy; additional collections. Cambridge University Press. Identifier mInTheRomanEmpire.

This book discusses pagan monotheism in its philosophical and intellectual context, traces the evolution of new religious ideas in the time of the Roman empire, and evaluates the usefulness of the term 'monotheism' as a way of understanding these developments in later antiquity outside the context of Judaism and Christianity. In doing so, it establishes a framework for understanding the relationship between polytheistic and monotheistic religious cultures between the first and fourth centuries A. .

Eine internationale Diskussion (Berlin 1997), especially the contribution by Iggers, . Historismus - Geschichte und Bedeutung. Eine kritische Übersicht der neuesten Literatur, 102–26.

On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

In a well-structured methodological article, "Pagan Monotheism as a Religious Phenomenon" (pp. 16-33), Peter Van Nuffelen discusses the history and usefulness of such coinages as henotheism, monotheism, and monolatry, together with the neologism megatheism, in the context of the study of Greco-Roman religion.

In essence, pagan monotheism becomes a heuristic device. The final paper in the volume is by Stephen Mitchell. It is a brilliant rejoinder to critics of his 1999 article on the cult of Theos Hypsistos.

chapter 1 Introduction: the debate about pagan monotheism Stephen Mitchell and Peter Van Nuffelen Within the largely stable social and political structures of the RomanEmpire, the most far-reaching change was the religious revolution by which the polytheistic environment of the age of Augustus gave way tothe overwhelming predominance of monotheism in the age of St Augus-tine. This transformation in religious On the one hand they have deliberately shifted  Mitchell and Van Nuffelen( . In primis Edwards (  ). Advertisement.

com: Pagan Monotheism in Late Antiquity (9780199248018): Polymnia Athanassiadi, Michael Frede: Books. 471 Views · View 2 Upvoters. Related QuestionsMore Answers Below. Yes. The ancient Neo-Platonists were monotheists, especially given their discussion of the One. They are technically pagans because they wrote while remaining unaffiliated with or outright rejectors of Christianity. They were more of a philosophical sect than a religion, even though they would probably identify as monotheists.

Graeco-Roman religion in its classic form was polytheistic; on the other hand, monotheistic ideas enjoyed wide currency in ancient philosophy. This contradiction provides a challenge for our understanding of ancient pagan religion. Certain forms of cult activity, including acclamations of 'one god' and the worship of theos hypsistos, the highest god, have sometimes been interpreted as evidence for pagan monotheism. This book discusses pagan monotheism in its philosophical and intellectual context, traces the evolution of new religious ideas in the time of the Roman empire, and evaluates the usefulness of the term 'monotheism' as a way of understanding these developments in later antiquity outside the context of Judaism and Christianity. In doing so, it establishes a framework for understanding the relationship between polytheistic and monotheistic religious cultures between the first and fourth centuries AD.