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ISBN:0801478111
Author: Matthew Fuhrmann
ISBN13: 978-0801478116
Title: Atomic Assistance: How "Atoms for Peace" Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs)
Format: docx mbr doc lrf
ePUB size: 1483 kb
FB2 size: 1909 kb
DJVU size: 1909 kb
Language: English
Category: Military
Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (July 24, 2012)
Pages: 344

Atomic Assistance: How "Atoms for Peace" Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs) by Matthew Fuhrmann



Matthew Fuhrmann's Atomic Assistance makes a critical contribution toward improving our understanding of the causes and effects of peaceful nuclear assistance. Policymakers, scholars, and students will all benefit greatly by reading this important book. Start reading Atomic Assistance on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Series: Cornell Studies in Security Affairs. In Atomic Assistance, Matthew Fuhrmann argues that governments use peaceful nuclear assistance as a tool of economic statecraft. Fuhrmann draws on several cases of "Atoms for Peace," including . civilian nuclear assistance to Iran from 1957 to 1979; Soviet aid to Libya from 1975 to 1986; French, Italian, and Brazilian nuclear exports to Iraq from 1975 to 1981; and . nuclear cooperation with India from 2001 to 2008.

The Nuclear Renaissance and International Security. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013. Benoît Pelopidas (a1).

Home All Categories Atomic Assistance: How "atoms for Peace" Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity. ISBN13: 9780801478116. Atomic Assistance : How "Atoms for Peace" Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity. Part of the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs Series). Nuclear technology is dual use in nature, meaning that it can be used to produce nuclear energy or to build nuclear weapons.

He is the author of Atomic Assistance: How Atoms for Peace Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity (Cornell University Press, 2012) and the coauthor of Nuclear Weapons and Coercive Diplomacy (Cambridge University Press . International security, military power, international conflict, nuclear proliferation, drones. Bio. Matthew Fuhrmann is Professor of Political Science at Texas A&M University. He was named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow in 2016 by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. He is the author of Atomic Assistance: How Atoms for Peace Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity (Cornell University Press, 2012) and the coauthor of Nuclear Weapons and Coercive Diplomacy (Cambridge University Press, 2016).

Atomic Assistance: How Atoms for Peace Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. How to Build a Nuclear Bomb: And Other Weapons of Mass Destruction. New York: Nation Books. Columbia University Press. Day 5 - 1/30: How Nuclear Weapons Work and the Consequences of Their Use - Frank Barnaby. How to Build a Nuclear Bomb, 15-39.

Atomic Assistance: How "Atoms for Peace" Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs). Author : Matthew Fuhrmann. Publisher : Cornell University Press. R.,434 on (FREE Delivery) R.,218 kart.

Atomic Assistance: How ‘Atoms for Peace’Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2012. Crisis bargaining and nuclear blackmail. TS Sechser, M Fuhrmann. International organization 67 (1), 173-195, 2013. Attacking the Atom: Does Bombing Nuclear Facilities Affect Proliferation? SE Kreps, M Fuhrmann. Journal of Strategic Studies 34 (2), 161-187, 2011. When leaders matter: Rebel experience and nuclear proliferation. M Fuhrmann, MC Horowitz. The Journal of Politics 77 (1), 72-87, 2014.

Matthew Fuhrmann – Texas A&M University Matthew Fuhrmann is an associate professor of political science and Ray A. Rothrock & Fellow at Texas A&M University. He is the author of Atomic Assistance: How Atoms for Peace Programs Cause Nuclear Insecurity (Cornell University Press, 2012. Todd S. Sechser – University of Virginia Todd S. Sechser is Associate Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia, and a former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Nuclear technology is dual use in nature, meaning that it can be used to produce nuclear energy or to build nuclear weapons. Despite security concerns about proliferation, the United States and other nuclear nations have regularly shared with other countries nuclear technology, materials, and knowledge for peaceful purposes. In Atomic Assistance, Matthew Fuhrmann argues that governments use peaceful nuclear assistance as a tool of economic statecraft. Nuclear suppliers hope that they can reap the benefits of foreign aid―improving relationships with their allies, limiting the influence of their adversaries, enhancing their energy security by gaining favorable access to oil supplies―without undermining their security. By providing peaceful nuclear assistance, however, countries inadvertently help spread nuclear weapons.

Fuhrmann draws on several cases of "Atoms for Peace," including U.S. civilian nuclear assistance to Iran from 1957 to 1979; Soviet aid to Libya from 1975 to 1986; French, Italian, and Brazilian nuclear exports to Iraq from 1975 to 1981; and U.S. nuclear cooperation with India from 2001 to 2008. He also explores decision making in countries such as Japan, North Korea, Pakistan, South Africa, and Syria to determine why states began (or did not begin) nuclear weapons programs and why some programs succeeded while others failed. Fuhrmann concludes that, on average, countries receiving higher levels of peaceful nuclear assistance are more likely to pursue and acquire the bomb―especially if they experience an international crisis after receiving aid.