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ISBN:0674024028
Author: Edward M. Coffman
ISBN13: 978-0674024021
Title: The Regulars: The American Army, 1898-1941
Format: lrf txt mbr lrf
ePUB size: 1901 kb
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Language: English
Category: Military
Publisher: Belknap Press; First Thus edition (April 30, 2007)
Pages: 528

The Regulars: The American Army, 1898-1941 by Edward M. Coffman



In 1898 the American Regular Army was a small frontier constabulary engaged in skirmishes with Indians and protesting workers. Forty-three years later, in 1941, it was a large modern army ready to wage global war against the Germans and the Japanese. In this definitive social history of America's standing army, military historian Edward Coffman tells how that critical transformation was accomplished. This book is about their lives and their roles in this era of momentous change. In the fall of 1969 a conversation with Francis Paul Prucha, author of the landmark military social history, Broadax and Bayonet: The Role of the United States Army in the Development of the Northwest 1815–1860, crystallized my thinking about a social history of the Regular Army from the War of Independence to World War II.

In 1898 the American Regular Army was a small frontier constabulary engaged in skirmishes with Indians and protesting workers. In this definitive social history of America's standing army, military historian Edward Coffman tells how that critical tran In 1898 the American Regular Army was a small frontier constabulary engaged in skirmishes with Indians and protesting workers. As in his earlier book, The Old Army, to which this is largely a sequel, Coffman gives as much attention to wives and families as he does to the officers and enlisted men themselves, and I have to say it’s this that mostly interests me. To be the child of an officer . 910 meant one or more transpacific voyages (lasting a month each way), and living in the exotic milieu of Manila or Tientsin.

Extramarc University of Toronto. Identifier regulars00edwa. Identifier-ark ark:/13960/t34212r32. Ocr ABBYY FineReader 1. Openlibrary OL7671061M. Openlibrary work OL17684296W. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on October 28, 2013.

October 1989 · JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association. British manpower and the States' Army. The first emperor - China's terracotta army. September 2007 · Arts of Asia. In this definitive social history of America's standing army, military historian Edward Coffman tells how that critical transformation was accomplished

Personal Name: Coffman, Edward M. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge, M. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The regulars : the American Army, 1898-1941, Edward M. Coffman.

In 1898, the American Regular Army was a small frontier constabulary engaged in skirmishes with Indians and protesting workers.

The American Army, 1898–1941. In this definitive social history of America’s standing army, military historian Edward Coffman tells how that critical transformation was accomplished. Coffman has spent years immersed in the official records, personal papers, memoirs, and biographies of regular army men, including such famous leaders as George Marshall, George Patton, and Douglas MacArthur. He weaves their stories, and those of others he has interviewed, into the story of an army which grew from a small community of posts in China and the Philippines to a highly effective mechanized ground and air force. 2005 Distinguished Book Award, Society for Military History.

In 1898 the American Regular Army was a small frontier constabulary engaged in skirmishes with Indians and protesting workers. Forty-three years later, in 1941, it was a large modern army ready to wage global war against the Germans and the Japanese. In this definitive social history of America's standing army, military historian Edward Coffman tells how that critical transformation was accomplished.

Coffman has spent years immersed in the official records, personal papers, memoirs, and biographies of regular army men, including such famous leaders as George Marshall, George Patton, and Douglas MacArthur. He weaves their stories, and those of others he has interviewed, into the story of an army which grew from a small community of posts in China and the Philippines to a highly effective mechanized ground and air force. During these years, the U.S. Army conquered and controlled a colonial empire, military staff lived in exotic locales with their families, and soldiers engaged in combat in Cuba and the Pacific. In the twentieth century, the United States entered into alliances to fight the German army in World War I, and then again to meet the challenge of the Axis Powers in World War II.

Coffman explains how a managerial revolution in the early 1900s provided the organizational framework and educational foundation for change, and how the combination of inspired leadership, technological advances, and a supportive society made it successful. In a stirring account of all aspects of garrison life, including race relations, we meet the men and women who helped reconfigure America's frontier army into a modern global force.

Reviews: 7
Yla
Huzzah for Coffman's account of the U.S.Army between Spain and Pearl Harbor. Not only does he trace the organizational evolution of the Army, but he includes many personal accounts of careers in the service to life on posts for the children. It is easy to forget that for forty years American soldiers served in China, the Philippines, and Panama. Coffman also describes the Army educational system at the Command and General Staff School and the War College that developed the leaders of World War II. This account is very comprehensive yet entirely readable.
Togar
Dr. Coffman is the consumate historian of the US Army. This is an outstanding account of the "Old Army". Fascinating first-person personal vignettes from old soldiers makes this a great reference work.
Siralune
Great insights on the rebuilding of the Army for WWII and the drawdown after the war.
Kardana
Classic by one of the greats!
Lonesome Orange Kid
This book Is required reading for anyone interested in real soldiering. A very hard profession for professionals without a war. With a war those professionals are priceless. By the way, I very strongly believe the new army since is not a good or reliably effective one. Too much dependence on "space war toys" that reduce the initiative and responsibility of a weapon bearer (see drones). Dangerously incompetent leadership at the top ( see Gulf War). This army could become a good one with an infusion of those "Regulars" who were soldiers. Read this book to learn about them.
Cordaron
It gave me a realistic understanding of the historical evolution of our current military and the system of which I became a part.
Llathidan
This book lacks the personal anecdotes from enlisted men that would have made this a successful tome. Even the Volunteers in the Philipines are not covered well.
I'm now in my 60s, and I grew up an Army brat in the 1950s, so much of the social history and attitudes depicted so clearly and engagingly in this engrossing book are familiar to me -- even though the author is speaking about a period a couple of generations earlier. Even though it changed dramatically during the forty years between the end of the War with Spain and the beginning of World War II, the Regular Army still is and always has been a deeply conservative institution. In times of national emergency, millions of civilians may volunteer and be drafted, but when the emergency is over they -- the survivors, anyway -- will take off their uniforms and go back to the civilian world. But the Regulars will still be there, like the rocks that reappear, unmoved, when the tide has flowed out again. During the late 19th century, the Army acted primarily as a frontier constabulary, fighting skirmishes against the Indians and maintaining order in Western communities (and suppressing labor strikes, unfortunately). The coming of war in 1898 brought a flurry of enlistments and applications for commissions, but the war itself didn't last very long. The result, however, was an empire in Cuba and Puerto Rico, and especially in the Philippines, and the Regulars found themselves in the role of an imperial military force, not unlike the British Army in India. There were also several regiments stationed in China as part of the international occupation force that followed the Boxer Rebellion. That period also provided practical experience for such future luminaries as Pershing, McArthur, Marshall, Arnold, and later Patton and Eisenhower -- not unlike the role played by the Mexican War for future Civil War generals. During the few years just before the United States got involved in World War I, the Army underwent a managerial revolution -- and "revolution" is not too strong a word -- under the leadership of Secretary of War Elihu Root (strongly backed by Theodore Roosevelt), who pushed through a long list of much-needed reforms, especially the formation of a general staff to centralize military planning and coordinating. That was followed by the drastic overhaul of the Military Academy and the establishment of the War College. After 1918, the Army was practically in limbo for more than a decade, with its budget cut, little attention given to technical development, and promotions so glacial many ambitious officers and noncoms resigned in frustration. Under FDR, however, it became clear to most military planners that a new global war was coming and the mobilization that began in the late '30s meant the Regulars were able to be halfway prepared by the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

As in his earlier book, The Old Army, to which this is largely a sequel, Coffman gives as much attention to wives and families as he does to the officers and enlisted men themselves, and I have to say it's this that mostly interests me. To be the child of an officer c.1910 meant one or more transpacific voyages (lasting a month each way), and living in the exotic milieu of Manila or Tientsin. In the 1920s, the destination was likely to be Hawaii, which was being developed as the center of U.S. military and naval operations in the Pacific. It was, in many ways, a cloistered life; it was still largely that way overseas in the early '50s, when I lived in occupied Europe. Things were a good deal different for the rank and file, of course, and even more so for non-white soldiers. The end of World War I coincided with a strong upturn in racial bigotry and discrimination, to which Coffman also gives full consideration, comparing it to the somewhat less strained earlier situation in which black officers like Benjamin O. Davis could built a career. Throughout the book, Coffman strews anecdotes and reminiscences from many published sources and from the hundreds of interviews he conducted with those who lived through the period, and there are a great many fascinating photos, mostly of the unposed snapshot variety, which makes them more true-to-life. The "all volunteer" Army of the 21st century is a very different world. This is a book that anyone with an interest in American military history, or in the U.S. in the 20th century generally, absolutely must read.