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ISBN:1846031761
Author: Gordon Rottman
ISBN13: 978-1846031762
Title: Fubar F***Ed Up Beyond All Recognition: Soldier Slang of World War II (General Military)
Format: mbr azw mobi txt
ePUB size: 1912 kb
FB2 size: 1478 kb
DJVU size: 1762 kb
Language: English
Category: Military
Publisher: Osprey Publishing (September 1, 2007)
Pages: 272

Fubar F***Ed Up Beyond All Recognition: Soldier Slang of World War II (General Military) by Gordon Rottman



The soldier slang of World War II was as colourful as it was evocative. It could be insulting, pessimistic, witty, and even defeatist. From 'spam bashers' to 'passion wagons' and 'roof pigs' to 'Hell's Ladies', the World War II fighting man was never short of words to describe the people and events in his life. F ed Up Beyond All Recognition" takes a frank look at the British, Commonwealth, American, German, Japanese and Russian slang used by the men on the ground, and shows how, even in the heat of battle, they somehow. 5:30 PM. Page 18. FUBAR: F ed Up Beyond All Recognition Vehicle (LVT). Those who used them also referred to LVTs as Large Vulnerable Targets, or sometimes amphtrac. Amphibian tank versions, however, were not called amtanks.

FUBAR F ed Up Beyond All Recognition: Soldier Slang of World War II (General Military). Download (pdf, . 2 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

It could be insulting, pessimistic, witty, and even defeatist.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The soldier slang of World War II was as colourful as it was evocative. It could be insulting, pessimistic, witty. this is the quintesensual book on military slang used from the 40's until even now. If you served reading it is like being back living in shacks and listening to the usual scuttlebutt of normal military life. S A Gallard CD Cdn Army Ret'd.

Gordon L. Rottman entered the US Army in 1967, volunteered for Special Forces and completed training as a weapons specialist. He served in the 5th Special Forces Group in Vietnam in 1969–70 and subsequently in airborne infantry, long-range patrol and intelligence assignments until retiring after 26 years. He was a Special Operations Forces scenario writer at the Joint Readiness Training Center for 12 years and is now a freelance writer, living in Texas.

From 'spam bashers' to 'passion wagons' and 'roof pigs' to 'Hell's Ladies', the World War II fighting man was never short of words to describe the people and events in his life. F ed Up Beyond All Recognition" takes a frank look at the British, Commonwealth, American, German, Japanese and Russian slang used by the men on the ground, and shows how, even in the heat of battle, they somehow managed to retain their sense of humour, black though it might have been. The Ancient World in Minutes(2719) Warplanes & Air Battles of World War II(2519) US Marine Corps in the Second World War: R(2223) 24 Hours in Ancient Egypt: A Day in the Li(2212) F/A-18 Hornet-Super Hornet Illustrated(1954) The History of WWII: 1941(1911) Smithsonian: The Dinosaur Book (Dk Smithso(1847) The Soldier Through History(1822) JUNKERS Ju.

Part of the General Military series. It could be insulting, pessimistic, witty and even defeatist. From 'spam bashers' to 'passion wagons' and 'roof pigs' to 'Hell's ladies' the World War II fighting man was never short of words to describe the people and events in his life. F ed Up Beyond All Recognition takes a frank look at the Commonwealth, American and German slang used by the men on the ground and.

Gordon Rottman - FUBAR F ed Up Beyond All Recognition: Soldier Slang of World War II Osprey Publishing 2009 ISBN: 1849081379 300 pages PDF 2. MB.

Much of the slang of World War II was handed down from World War I and earlier conflicts. These words were so ingrained into the soldier's vocabulary that their use was continued by a new generation of soldiers and by the end of the war some Humorous, sarcastic, sober, pessimistic, fatalistic, defiant or defeatist, slang is an important part of every soldier's vocabulary. Much of the slang of World War II was handed down from World War I and earlier conflicts. A quick reference book of slang terms used by soldiers during World War II, many of which are still in use today by soldiers and civilians alike. Good reference for general interest, and perhaps story writers or scripters. Author has a bit of a sly sense of humor evident in many of the definitions. Interesting to note how many of the words have found their way into the general lexicon. F ed Up Beyond All Recognition" takes a frank look at the British, Commonwealth, American, German, Japanese and Russian slang used by the men on the ground, and shows how, even in the heat of battle, they somehow managed to retain their sense of humour, black though it might have been

The soldier slang of World War II was as colourful as it was evocative. It could be insulting, pessimistic, witty and even defeatist. From 'spam bashers' to 'passion wagons' and 'roof pigs' to 'Hell's ladies' the World War II fighting man was never short of words to describe the people and events in his life. "F***ed Up Beyond All Recognition" takes a frank look at the Commonwealth, American and German slang used by the men on the ground and shows how, even in the heat of action, they somehow managed to retain their sense of humour, black though it might be.
Reviews: 7
Swordsong
This book will take you back through many wars and battles while learning what this crazy info we Vets used.to talk to each other....
So if you wanted to get "Squared Away" it will tell you why Vets all love to be squared away unlike many civilians who don't understand that being clean and neat is squared away lol

"Fubar and Snafu will be explained. Probably the 2 most often words used after WWII and introduced before the "F" work became common in civilian life while in the Military it is used in common conversation.
I don't think I dare and write the meanings of this Lingo here without getting thrown off. lol

You will find that the words change as we moved into Korea and Vietnam and all of the other wars and conflicts we have had
It's a funny read just keep it away from Minors in your home......
TheJonnyTest
I own several different dictionaries of military slang, and this is far and away the best. Rottman did his homework. In addition to library research, he worked with online discussion groups including WW II vets to understand the precise meaning (or meanings) of expressions. He also has a way with words himself -- it's not easy to get ideas across in brief dictionary entries, but Rottman does it. The entries are always informative, often full of personality, and sometimes funny -- never pedantic. It's also obvious that helping to recreate and preserve the culture of WW II soldiers is something Rottman really cares about.

Before I peeked at his Amazon listing, I was pretty sure that this wasn't Rottman's first book on the war. The depth of his knowledge really shines through. I had more than a few "Wow, I didn't know that!" moments while reading. For example: "Zombies." These were Canadian soldiers who declined to volunteer for overseas deployment. Apparently if you didn't volunteer, Canada would not send you. Didn't know that.

Reading this book is like eating a really well-prepared meal -- it's full of little surprises and pleasures. Highly recommended. If you have a serious interest in WW II, this should be in your collection.
Ziena
If you have read much WW2 history, many of the terms will be old hat, but I did find lots of educational entries. The information on British, Commonwealth, and German slang was mostly new to me. I was surprised to see that "Furphy" was omitted (WW1 Australian slang for erroneous water cooler gossip).

Also, the slang is oriented towards ground forces only (Army and Marines), with no Navy slang to speak of.

Three and one-half stars. If you are not a regular reader of WW2 history, the rating is higher.
Mitynarit
Anyone familiar with Gordon Rottman's work know they can expect excellence. In this book he takes the dictionary format to it's highest level with humor and common sense practicality. When looking for quick research type books I always look for Rottman's work and order with confidence that it will be as described and will meet my needs. In this case I needed Wehrmacht slang without spending hours researching and translating. FUBAR: Soldier Slang of World War II delivered very nicely.
Ueledavi
Having been a MARINE's wife forever, I found some of this factual, but a lot of it not ...the title is classic USMC, however. Someone should have looked a little more closely at some of the author's definitions.
Diredefender
NAM memories.
Delalbine
if lists are your thing this is a Five star. Not really a book, it's a listing with no story or characters as such.
I always enjoy books on slang. It would be nicer if it had more origins of the words. Blah, Blah to fill word requirements.