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ISBN:0813338697
Author: Eric M Bergerud
ISBN13: 978-0813338699
Title: Fire In The Sky: The Air War In The South Pacific
Format: docx lrf doc txt
ePUB size: 1886 kb
FB2 size: 1478 kb
DJVU size: 1934 kb
Language: English
Category: Military
Publisher: Basic Books; Complete Numbers Starting with 1, 1st Ed edition (April 13, 2001)
Pages: 752

Fire In The Sky: The Air War In The South Pacific by Eric M Bergerud



Fire in the Sky is possibly the very best analysis of a major air campaign ever placed in print. Bergerud’s consummate writing style is very entertaining, his skillful use of personal anecdote combined with the detachment of a historian, blend into compelling reading and a truly enjoyable experience. Destined to be the definitive history of the air war in the South Pacific, no serious student of World War Two oraviation can afford not to have this book in their personal library. Indeed the struggle for dominancein the South Pacific began when Japan seized Rabaul northeast of Australia in January 1942.

In the first two years of the Pacific War of World War II, air forces from Japan, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand engaged in a ruthless struggle for superiority in the skies over the Solomon Islands and New Guinea.

2011-11-07The Air War In Southeast Asia (Case Studies of Selected Campaigns). 2010-05-30Fire In The Sky: The Air War In The South Pacific. 2010-05-29Fire In The Sky: The Air War In The South Pacific. 2018-01-26 Touched with Fire: The Land War in the South Pacific. 2018-01-15 The Great Canoes in the Sky: Starlore and Astronomy of the South Pacific. 2017-05-11Touched With Fire: The Land War In The South Pacific. 2017-03-11Touched With Fire The Land War in the South Pacific. 2016-12-30The Great Canoes in the Sky Starlore and Astronomy of the South Pacific

Fire In The Sky book. I appreciated Bergerud's thesis that in the air war with Japan, the Allies eventually overwhelmed the Japanese with quantitative and qualitative superiority, but before the advanced technology was introduced-the F6F Hellcats and F4U Corsairs, the radio and the radar and the proximity fuses, the Essex class aircraft carriers and the Iowa class battleships

This book analyzes in depth the air war between Japan and the Allies in the South Pacific during World War II. The struggle took place on an immense battlefield that included New Guinea, New Britain, and the Solomon Islands. The period I examine begins in early 1942, when both sides almost simultaneously mounted serious military operations in the area. I end the analysis in early 1944, when the Allies crushed Japanese land-based airpower at the great base at Rabaul, a process completed by May 1944. Their defensive line shattered and their forces greatly weakened by the debacle in the South Pacific, the Japanese were unable to resist the coming onslaught that put the Allies on Tokyo's doorstep just more than a year later. Three years ago I wrote Touched with Fire: The Land War in the South Pacific, which analyzes the brutal ground struggle in the same theater.

Always interested in the war in the South Pacific because my father was a pilot in VP-12 (Black Cats) from 41-45, though patrol squadrons aren't the subject of his book. A lot of the content in Fire in the Sky is great, in many ways a worthy successor to Bergerud's first-rate Touched by Fire and Red Thunder, Tropic Lightning. Even pretty knowledgeable readers will learn a lot from reading this book, and Bergerud presents the air war in a clear, dispassionate, and intelligent manner that really allowed me to understand the conflict in the Pacific at a level that I never had before.

In the first two years of the Pacific War of World War II, air forces from Japan, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand engaged in a ruthless struggle for superiority in the skies over the Solomon Islands and New Guinea. with surviving veterans of all ranks and duties, Eric Bergerud recreates the fabric of the air war as it was fought in the South Pacific. He explores the technology and tactics, the three-dimensional battlefield, and the leadership, living conditions, medical challenges, and morale of the combatants.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker. Touched with Fire: The Land War in the South Pacific.

In the first two years of the Pacific War of World War II, air forces from Japan, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand engaged in a ruthless struggle for superiority in the skies over the Solomon Islands and New Guinea. Despite operating under primitive conditions in a largely unknown and malignant physical environment, both sides employed the most sophisticated technology available at the time in a strategically crucial war of aerial attrition. In one of the largest aerial campaigns in history, the skies of the South Pacific were dominated first by the dreaded Japanese Zeros, then by Allied bombers, which launched massed raids at altitudes under fifty feet, and finally by a ferocious Allied fighter onslaught led by a cadre of the greatest aces in American military history.Utilizing primary sources and scores of interviews with surviving veterans of all ranks and duties, Eric Bergerud recreates the fabric of the air war as it was fought in the South Pacific. He explores the technology and tactics, the three-dimensional battlefield, and the leadership, living conditions, medical challenges, and morale of the combatants. The reader will be rewarded with a thorough understanding of how air power functioned in World War II from the level of command to the point of fire in air-to-air combat.
Reviews: 7
Lucam
This book is not for everyone. It is a detailed analysis of the situation and developments related to the early air war around New Guinea and the Solomon Island chain. This book is very detailed. The author does a fantastic job of gathering data on what transpired and then rational analysis as to why events unfolded as they did. And how the combatants of both sides faced the odds from each other, the geography, the weather and the environment. This book is not an action based air battle book. Yet I found it extremely interesting and hard to put down. Probably in part due to my Naval Aviation and military analysis background. It is well written and easy to read. Filled with many personal accounts of those who were there (perhaps on average one every other page). Each account relates to the particular topic the author is analyzing. And the accounts range from those of pilots to air operations to mechanics to the medical personnel etc.
The authors conclusions are firmly based on his thorough investigation and analysis and opened my eyes to a part of the war in the South Pacific that I thought I already understood. A must read if you crave for the real story of things as I do. As someone once said "The real story is usually much more interesting than the myth."
RUL
Always interested in the war in the South Pacific because my father was a pilot in VP-12 (Black Cats) from 41-45, though patrol squadrons aren't the subject of his book.
The contents of Fire in the Sky is what is usually summarized in just a few pages in other histories of the war, possibly because the war in the South Pacific was about as unglamorous as war can be. Bergerud's research, along with interviews, are the stars of the show. He shows how badly the Japanese underestimated the willingness and ability of the allies to fight with the forces on hand at the outbreak of the war and before the massive build up that came in late 1943. That's the good news and what makes this book well worth reading.
The cons of the book are that the author uses adjectives and adverbs excessively. Everything seems to have added emphasis. Discussing the book with a friend, we both immediately commented that it could have benefited from better editing. There is frequent and considerable digression from the subject at hand, critiques, and plenty of "what if" speculation. The book is written in a circular fashion, each chapter returning anew to the beginning of the campaigns, so that there is a good deal of repetition, as if the reader needs to be reminded of the contents of the previous chapters. Unlike many historians, Bergerud is a fan of MacArthur, his murderous South Pacific strategy, and entirely unnecessary invasion of the Philippines. Considering how he speculates endlessly about everything else, it's a shame he didn't speculate how the war might have been shorter with far less loss of life had MacArthur been taken prisoner in the Philippines, leaving Nimitz to conduct the war on his own.
Winn
A lot of the content in Fire in the Sky is great, in many ways a worthy successor to Bergerud's first-rate Touched by Fire and Red Thunder, Tropic Lightning. Even pretty knowledgeable readers will learn a lot from reading this book, and Bergerud presents the air war in a clear, dispassionate, and intelligent manner that really allowed me to understand the conflict in the Pacific at a level that I never had before.
All that having been said, this book is an incredible case study for a near-total editorial failure. The narration veers into meandering pointlessness for pages upon pages on many occasions. Huge sections are almost completely unfoucussed. Where Bergerud retains his focus and has a point, the effect is excellent, and produces a result that falls just short of Keegan. But brevity is the soul of wit, and where he doesn't, the whole thing becomes a morass.
It's interesting to watch the progression: Red Thunder, Tropic Lighting had tight, crisp prose and a focussed narrative, and was easily Bergerud's best book. Touched with Fire was detailed and insightful, and was absolutely first-rate despite it's tendancy to go on a bit and repeat himself a bit too often. Fire in the Sky, though, has really gone over the edge. To get the most of this book (and there really is quite a lot in there to come away with), you really have to be willing to either wade through a lot of pointless rambling or be willing to skip over large sections.
Don't get me wrong, I'm giving this book 4 stars, because there is a lot of awesome content and when it's controlled, the writing is very good. This book clearly had the potential to be a definitive work with a strong editorial hand, which is how highly I think of a lot of the content. Unfortunately, the hand was clearly missing.