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Download The Art of War epub book
ISBN:0978653637
Author: Antoine Henri De Jomini,G. H. Mendell,W. P. Craighill,Horace E. Cocroft
ISBN13: 978-0978653637
Title: The Art of War
Format: mbr txt azw mobi
ePUB size: 1922 kb
FB2 size: 1664 kb
DJVU size: 1965 kb
Language: English
Category: Military
Publisher: Arc Manor; Reformatted ed. edition (November 15, 2006)
Pages: 300

The Art of War by Antoine Henri De Jomini,G. H. Mendell,W. P. Craighill,Horace E. Cocroft



Jomini, Antoine Henri,, baron de, 1779-1869. Uniform Title: Prâecis de l'art de la guerre. Download The art of war by Antoine Henri de Jomini (Baron de Jomini) ; translated from the French by .

Translated by G. H. Mendell. amp; W. P. Craighill. Horace E. Cocroft, Jr. The Art of War by Antoine Henri (Baron) de Jomini. Originally published in French, 1836. The Art of War is a book with a purpose to educate.

This e-book may become hostile and unpleasant to talk with in the presence of anything written by Clausewitz. The Baron de Jomini’s The Art of War is a special case – a magnum opus of one of the most influential thinkers on war in the 19th century, it was translated twice at West Point.

Antoine Henri de Jomini, G. Mendell (Translated from the French by), John-Allen Price (Introdution by). Скачать (pdf, . 8 Mb).

Antoine-Henri, baron Jomini (March 6, 1779-March 24, 1869), general in the French and afterwards in the Russian service, and one of the most celebrated writers on the Napoleonic art of war, was born at Payerne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland, where his father was syndic. Early life and career Jomini's youthful preference for a military life was disappointed by the dissolution of the Swiss regiments of France at the start of the Revolution.

An eyewitness to most of the important battles of the Napoleonic Wars, Baron Antoine Henri de Jomini served with both the French and the Anglo-Allied armies. Summary An eyewitness to most of the important battles of the Napoleonic Wars, Baron Antoine Henri de Jomini served with both the French and the Anglo-Allied armies.

The art of war, as generally considered, consists of five purely military branches,-viz. Strategy, Grand Tactics, Logistics, Engineering, and Tactics. De Jomini was an eyewitness to most of Napoleon's important battles, and privy to the machinations of the Great Man himself. As a member of Napoleon's staff and a keen observer, de Jomini's descriptions of the battles are widely recognized by military experts to be both accurate and insightful.

Antoine Henri De Jomini, Mendell & Craighill, Horace E Cocroft. In 1991, General Norman Schwarzkopf drove Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait using several specific strategies. Schwarzkopf established a temporary supply base in the Saudi Arabian desert to form a base of operations for the .

"In 1991, General Norman Schwarzkopf drove Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait using several specific strategies. Schwarzkopf established a temporary supply base in the Saudi Arabian desert to form a base of operations for the U.S. Seventh Corps and then used Marine and Arab coalition allies in a pinning operation against Iraqi troops in Kuwait while the Seventh Corps made a turning movement into the Iraqi rear. Having captured its limited, geographic objective, the coalition called a halt to the war. Schwarzkopf's strategies came straight from Antoine-Henri Jomini's The Art of War, which is the foundation of professional military education in the Western world." - from the new introduction....Antoine Henri de Jomini's The Art of War is considered by many to be the definitive work on military strategy and tactics. His impact on professional military thinking, doctrine and vocabulary is unparalleled by any other military theoretician. Though authors like Clausewitz may be better known to some, few can match the breadth of practical advice offered by the man who served both Napoleon and the Russian Tsar....This edition faithfully reproduces Jomini's seminal work, beautifully reformatted and typeset and includes a new introduction and brief chapter by chapter commentary.
Reviews: 7
Windforge
I want to tell future readers of this book in this way. I read it first when I was 14 or 15. I thought it was a book on how to smartly fight a war. Then I re-read it when I was 28 and it occurred to me that it may be an instruction book on how to navigate an honorable life. Years passed and I recently found it at the bottom of a box in my closet. I read it again at age 56. I realized it has more to offer. If you read this book, you will actively have to replace Sun Tzus' ancient terms and placement of hierarchy and apply them to modern situations and people. Family, bosses, neighbors, employees and the list goes on. It is my belief that this "manual" can help solve minor and major disruptions in life if used correctly. It is a book meant for good.
Xtreem
This is an absolutely amazing book on self-discipline and creativity.

If you're an entrepreneur, an artist, a writer, scientist or just about anybody with an internal urge to CREATE something but cannot because of distractions, fears, doubts and apprehensions, then this is the book for you.

This will book show and define the #1 thing that's stopping you from bringing out your creative potential. It's called Resistance and how it behaves and how it beats you.

And then it stresses why we should overcome the resistance and how to overcome it successfully by detaching ourselves from the fruits, operating from a territorial perspective (i.e. Doing work for the sake of doing work).

By the time I reached the small chapter on Gita and Krishna's explanation on doing work for work's sake, I literally had tears in my eyes.

... Because that's the way an artist must operate, not caring for the fruits.

And I can attest my success in my business & job for JUST that. I gave up all hopes, desires & doubts I had.

I didn't care. I just decided to do the work, punched in my time and 3 years later, I'm at a level that's shocking for many (but something I dreamed about).

However, I still have a lot of blocks where I didn't express myself and get the creative part of me and I'm fortunate to have come across this book.

Anyone who is here to CREATE something - read it. It will change your life!
MOQ
VERY misleading of Amazon. This is a thin booklet overview. The reviews here cover many different versions of The Art of War and are all combined here. It's a complete joke. Get it together AMAZON.
Weiehan
This is a ~15 page "summary" of the book. Ordered this thinking it was the full text because it doesn't say otherwise in the description.
Reemiel
It’s clear that Mr. Gagliardi is extremely passionate about all things Sun Tzu. Through various repackaged books sold both here at Amazon and through the “Science of Strategy Institute” he set up to sell you Sun Tzu themed board games and videos, he has certainly created a virtual cottage industry of Sunzi-phernalia. In addition, he also offers personalized training packages for up to $1,500 to amp up your ability to unleash the power of Sun Tzu’s system of total and complete victory in all competitive endeavors you face, whether in the boardroom or the bedroom.

But all of this aside, how successful is Mr. Gagliardi at his most basic task: competently translating Sun Tzu’s original text, The Art of War? The answer: not very.

This book is a complete mess, with unforgivable errors in both translation and general knowledge concerning China and the Warring States era present in almost every verse. In lieu of a laundry list I will give you just a one line example where Mr. Gagliardi clearly shows that he is out of his depth in terms of translation competence. I maintain a database of 30 translations of The Art of War in English that I use to compare and contrast various efforts, and included the screenshot of the relevant verse so you can compare it to how others have approached the text.

In Chapter 11, Sun Tzu is concerned that his own soldiers might either break and run or else refuse to support the other flanks of his own army while in battle. To show how this can be remedied, Sun Tzu brings up the example of how a certain snake can provide a valuable lesson for his soldiers. As Gagliardi translates it, the line reads: “Act like an ordinary mountain snake.”

From a novice’s perspective, this could be a defensible translation choice. The original Chinese characters for this line are:

CHANG SHAN ZHI SHE

If you looked up each character individually via the internet you could definitely make a case that the line could read:

ordinary mountain (of) snake

The problem is that professional translation doesn’t work this way (a one-for-one translation of characters), and you have to understand all of the nuances applicable to how these thoughts are put together, especially when you are talking about a millennia old text written in a language vastly different than its modern equivalent. What a competent Sinologist would easily understand, but Gagliardi obviously didn’t, is that the character CHANG isn’t functioning as an adjective modifying the noun “snake,” but instead is the proper noun indicating the name of the mountain on which the snake resides. So the line should read:

“Act like the snake of Mt. Chang”

So while Gagliardi is perfectly content in his own ignorance that Sun Tzu is talking about an ordinary snake, what the text is really saying is that he needs his soldiers to be like an EXTRAordinary snake which possesses the magical ability to continue providing support to its endangered other half even after being cleaved into two separate parts.

Now if you are looking to really get beyond the basics of the translation (say like someone who is willing to shell out $1,500 for advanced personal lessons) and might be curious where this Mt. Chang is located and why it was relevant to Sun Tzu, you might be surprised. Sun Tzu never actually mentioned Mt. Chang, but instead was referring to a Mt. Heng, where this extraordinary snake supposedly lived (by the way, Sun Tzu gave the snake a name, the Shuairan, a fact that was completely missed by Gagliardi). It turns out that the oldest extant copy of the Art of War was transcribed during the Han Dynasty period. What professional Sinologists know but Mr. Gagliardi might not, is that in classical Chinese there was a prohibition on using characters that were the same as the personal name of the sitting emperor. At around the same time as we believe the earliest version of The Art of War was transcribed, Emperor Wen of Han was sitting on the throne and had a personal name of “Liu Heng” which means that “Heng” would need to be omitted from all texts. “Heng” actually means “Perseverance” and it turns out that “Chang” also carries the meaning of “Perseverance” so Mt. Heng was changed to Mt. Chang to get around this prohibition—an interesting tidbit for your next trivia night.

Of course the name change does nothing to impact your understanding of the Art of War, but does illustrate the difference between buying a copy of the The Art of War from a professional Sinologist who understands both the translation issues and can provide relevant historical and philosophical background, and the rank amateur who does this for a hobby and wants to pass off an inferior product hoping you won't know the difference. There are too many professionally done Sun Tzu translations available by qualified individuals (Ames, Griffith, Sawyer, Ivanhoe, Mair, Minford) to justify paying the same amount of money for Mr. Gagliardi’s lackluster effort.

You wouldn’t select a surgeon for your triple-bypass surgery simply because he was “passionate” about cutting people open and learned some things on the internet. You would want to select someone who has years of relevant professional experience under their belt, and just as important, board certified. Fortunately, the stakes aren't quite so high when choosing the best Sun Tzu translation, but the same principle should apply. Don't be an ordinary purchaser of this classic text, be an extraordinary one.