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ISBN:0199513619
Author: Robert Blake
ISBN13: 978-0199513611
Title: Gladstone, Disraeli, and Queen Victoria: The Centenary Romanes Lecture Delivered Before the University of Oxford on 10 November 1992
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Language: English
Category: Europe
Publisher: Oxford Univ Pr (October 1, 1995)
Pages: 25

Gladstone, Disraeli, and Queen Victoria: The Centenary Romanes Lecture Delivered Before the University of Oxford on 10 November 1992 by Robert Blake



Blake, Robert, 1916-2003. Publication, Distribution, et. Oxford ; New York. Clarendon Press, (c)1993. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Gladstone, Disraeli, and Queen Victoria : the Centenary Romanes lecture delivered before the University of Oxford on 10 November 1992, Robert Blake.

Lord Blake delivered the Romanes Centenary Lecture before the University of Oxford on 10 November 1992. The first Romanes Lecture was given by Gladstone on 24 October 1892. On this centenary occasion it seems appropriate to say something about one of Oxford's greatest alumni and about two other eminent Victorians with whom he had so many dealings - Benjamin Disraeli and the Queen Victoria. He was unhappy with the Queen and hated Disraeli who reciprocated the feeling. She came to adore Disraeli and detest Gladstone who was nevertheless a strong monarchist. The lecture analyzes this triple relationship and shows that party politics were as much involved as personality. It also discusses the role of the Victorian monarchy, some of whose problems, especially in finance and public relations, are of topical interest today.

1992 Robert Blake - Gladstone, Disraeli and Queen Victoria (The Centenary Lecture). 1993 Henry Harris - Hippolyte's club foot: the medical roots of realism in modern European literature. 1994 Lord Slynn of Hadley - Europe and Human Rights. Romanes lectures, University of Oxford, 1986–2002, Oxford, Bodleian Library: MSS. Eng. c. 7027, Top. Oxon. Reason before identity. Oxford New York: Oxford University Press. Romanes Lectures since 1892 at the University web site.

1992 Robert Blake - Gladstone, Disraeli and Queen Victoria ( The Centenary Lecture ). 1995 Walter Bodmer - The Book of Man. 1996 Roy Jenkins - The Chancellorship of Oxford: A Contemporary View with a Little History. 1997 Mary Robinson -. 1998 Amartya Sen - Reason before identity. 1999 Tony Blair -. 2000s. 2006 Lecture was to have been delivered by Gordon Brown, but was postponed. 2007 Dame Gillian Beer - Darwin and the Consciousness of Others. 2008 Muhammad Yunus -. On this centenary occasion it seems appropriate to say something about one of Oxford's greatest alumni and about twoother eminent Victorians with whom he had so many dealings - Benjamin Disraeli and the Queen herself. He was unhappy with the Queen and hated Disraeli, who reciprocated the feeling. She came to adore Disraeli and detest Gladstone, who was nevertheless a strong monarchist.

Gladstone, Disraeli and Queen Victoria Centenary Romanes Lecture 1993. Winston Churchill 1998. a b c d e f g h Morgan, Kenneth O "Blake, Robert Norman William, Baron Blake 1916–2003" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography online ed Oxford University Press doi:101093/ref:odnb/92619 Subscription or UK public library membership required. Roberts, Andrew "Lord Blake" London: Royal Society of Literature. Matthew, Colin 23 September 2003 "Lord Blake of Braydeston" The Guardian. "No 45372" The London Gazette 18 May 1971 p 5157. The Times, 23 July 1996 Jim McCue, Edmund Burke and Our Present Discontents The Claridge Press, 1997, p 123.

The Romanes Lecture is a prestigious free public lecture given annually at the Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford. Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). Edgar Douglas Adrian, 1st Baron Adrian (born London, 30 November 1889, died London, 4 August 1977) was a British electrophysiologist and recipient of the 1932 Nobel Prize for Physiology, won jointly with Sir Charles Sherrington for work on the function of neurons. 1992 Robert Blake - Gladstone, Disraeli and Queen Victoria (The Centenary Lecture).

Disraeli and Gladstone were both politicians of extraordinary ability - but their personalities clashed and they heartily loathed each other. Robert Blake, the British constitutional historian, compares their political careers, and charts their stormy relationship. In the general election of 1 April 1880, the Conservative party under Benjamin Disraeli was crushingly defeated by the Liberals (known as Whigs) - under William Gladstone

The Romanes Lecture is the annual public lecture of the University. A most distinguished public figure from the arts, science or literature is invited by special invitation of the Vice-Chancellor. The lecture was created in 1891, following an offer by George John Romanes of Christ Church to fund an annual lecture, and the first lecture was given in 1892 by William Gladstone. 1992 - The Rt Hon the Lord Blake: Gladstone, Disraeli and Queen Victoria. 1993 - Professor Sir Henry Harris: Hippolyte's Club Foot - The medical roots of realism in modern European literature. 1994 - The Rt Hon Lord Slynn of Hadley: Europe and Human Rights. 1998 - Professor Amartya Sen: Reason before Identity. 1999 - The Prime Minister, The Rt Hon Tony Blair MP: The Learning Habit. 2000 - William G Bowen: At a Slight Angle to the Universe.

Lord Blake delivered the Romanes Centenary Lecture before the University of Oxford on 10 November 1992. The first Romanes Lecture was given by Gladstone on 24 October 1892. On this centenary occasion it seems appropriate to say something about one of Oxford's greatest alumni and about two other eminent Victorians with whom he had so many dealings - Benjamin Disraeli and the Queen Victoria. He was unhappy with the Queen and hated Disraeli who reciprocated the feeling. She came to adore Disraeli and detest Gladstone who was nevertheless a strong monarchist. The lecture analyzes this triple relationship and shows that party politics were as much involved as personality. It also discusses the role of the Victorian monarchy, some of whose problems, especially in finance and public relations, are of topical interest today. The conclusion is that the survival of the monarchy after itss unpopularity in the early 1870s owed as much to Gladstone's loyalty and discretion as it did to Disraeli's flattery and cajolary.