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ISBN:1840331100
Author: John Hood
ISBN13: 978-1840331103
Title: Old Aberfoyle, Thornhill and the Forth Villages
Format: txt lit docx doc
ePUB size: 1625 kb
FB2 size: 1853 kb
DJVU size: 1966 kb
Language: English
Category: Europe
Publisher: Stenlake Publishing (June 1, 2000)
Pages: 48

Old Aberfoyle, Thornhill and the Forth Villages by John Hood



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ISBN : 9781840331103 Price : £. 9. These villages have traditionally been agricultural, although tourism has been important since the eighteenth century and continues to thrive. There's a picture of what was the largest vine in the world, Aberfoyle's station (long since closed and demolished), one of the smiddys at Thornhill, and numerous other landmarks in these attractive villages. Includes pictures of Milton, Gartmore, Buchlyvie, Arnprior, Kippen, Cauldhame, Gargunnock and Port of Mentieth, as well as Aberfoyle and Thornhill

Old Aberfoyle, Thornhill and the Forth Villages Old Aberfoyle, Thornhill and the Forth Villages. Includes pictures of Milton, Gartmore, Buchlyvie, Arnprior, Kippen, Cauldhame, Gargunnock and Port of Mentieth, as well as Aberfoyle and Thornhill. These villages have traditionally been agricultural, although tourism has been important since the eighteenth century and continues to thrive

Aberfoyle was the third most important quarry in Scotland in the early 1900s and the location of some of the highest quality Scottish slate. Slate was only used for very big important buildings such as castles roofs and public buildinga as ordinary people thatched their roof with different natural materials, including straw, grass and bracken. Just a short walk from the Village is the old graveyard and Kirk at Kirkton, once the hub of the village and now a ruin. The facinating history surrounding the Old Kirk is well worth a visit to learn more on the story of the Reverend Robert Kirk who, as legend would have it, was spirited away by the fairies in 1692 after he betrayed their secrets by writing about them in his book "The Secret Commonwealth of Elfs, Fauns and Fairies". This, and the nearby Doon Hill make a facinating walk as the lone Scots Pine on the top of the hill is said to contain the spirit of Robert Kirk.

With towns and villages scattered across coast, country, mountains and glens, and the historic city of Stirling thrown in for good measure, it's no wonder that there are a host of things to do and places to explore in the area. Something in the water. Aberfoyle is a charming village on the banks of the River Forth in the magnificent Queen Elizabeth Forest Park. Towns & Villages.

The old town of Aberfoyle was south of the River Forth, in the area now known as Kirkton. The town moved north of the river, with the result that several of the older buildings are well away from the town centre. One of these is Kirkton church. This road winds its way through a gap in the hills, which has gained the moniker, 'The 'Duke's Pass'.

Aberfoyle is a testament to the early power of literary tourism. Until 1810 it was a small village with a bridge over the River Forth and some slate quarries (yes, the same River Forth that ends up as a major east coast Firth). Though there had been an ancient settlement here on the site of the fortress built by Aedan, Prince of the Forth in the 500s, it was not on a through route to anywhere in particular, and would probably have remained small and fairly inconsequential. Sir Walter Scott changed all that. More conventional visitor attractions include the Scottish Wool Centre, offering shopping, eating and animals; and the Trossachs Discovery Centre, offering a wide range of visitor information about the area.

Main Street, Aberfoyle, Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park FK8 3UQ Scotland. Glasgow Intl Airport21 mi. Edinburgh Airport43 mi. See all nearby hotels. Wee Blether Tea Room.

Thornhill is a village in the Scottish council area of Stirling. It lies 14 miles from Stirling itself, south of Callander, east of Aberfoyle and west of Doune. The village is in the parish of Norrieston, named from the much earlier village of Norrieston which lay a little to the east of Thornhill. It is situated on a slight elevation at the western edge of the Carse of Stirling, an area of flat agricultural land which forms the upper part of the floodplain of the River Forth. The village lies on a traditional east/west route from Dunblane to Aberfoyle which passes the Old Post Cottage and was planned and founded at the end of the seventeenth century. The 2001 census population for the area covered by the Thornhill and Blairdrummond Community Council is 1,109. Thornhill has one primary school which in the session 2009-2010 had 62 pupils from the village and surrounding area.