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ISBN:0812921984
Author: Drew Fetherston
ISBN13: 978-0812921984
Title: The Chunnel: The Amazing Story of the Undersea Crossing of the English Channel
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ePUB size: 1610 kb
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Language: English
Category: Europe
Publisher: Crown; 1st edition (October 28, 1997)
Pages: 404

The Chunnel: The Amazing Story of the Undersea Crossing of the English Channel by Drew Fetherston



Drew Fetherston's epic chronicle of the Channel Tunnel is the story of these dreamers and of the men and women who finally made the dream a reality. Conceived by hard-headed businessmen and intended to make money, the tunnel project became a fiscal disaster. Drew Fetherston's epic chronicle of the Channel Tunnel is the story of these dreamers and of the men and women who finally made the dream a reality

Library of Congress Control Number: 96039681. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The Chunnel : the amazing story of the undersea crossing of the English Channel, Drew Fetherston.

The construction of the tunnel running below the English Channel-popularly known as the Chunnel-may be one of the most remarkable examples of human engineering on the planet, a 1990s version of the Panama Canal, or a transcontinental railroad beneath the waves. The idea of a tunnel connecting England and France had been around for many generations before the technological know-how and monetary muscle combined to make the project possible in the late 20th century

In the fall of 1990, however, British and French excavators achieved a significant breakthrough, meeting at a midpoint beneath the English Channel. Now in service, the Chunnel encompasses three continuous tubes (each more than 49 kilometers in length) from Folkestone to Coquelles, plus dozens of cross-passages and chambers whose uses range from equipment storage through train switching

The construction of the tunnel running below the English Channel-popularly known as the Chunnel-may be one of the most remarkable examples of human engineering o. .

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. The Chunnel : the amasing story of the undersea crossingof the English Channel Drew Fetherston. Book's title: The Chunnel : the amasing story of the undersea crossingof the English Channel Drew Fetherston. Library of Congress Control Number: 96039681. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0812921984. Library of Congress Call Number: TF238. Dewey Decimal Classification Number: 62. 94 21. Personal Name: Fetherston, Drew.

Large engineering projects are invariably multidimensional, and their planning and execution can stretch more than decades, even centuries. Not infrequently, the greatest challenges to overcome before the engineering begins are the political, ecological and economic obstacles. The Panama Canal, among the great projects heralding the enormous technological achievements of the 20th century, is one example. When Columbus claimed America for Spain in the late 15th century, he was, of course, looking for a westward route to the East

The construction of the tunnel running below the English Channel-popularly known as the Chunnel-may be one of the most remarkable examples of human engineering on the planet, a 1990s version of the Panama Canal, or a transcontinental railroad beneath the waves. The idea of a tunnel connecting England and France had been around for many generations before the technological know-how and monetary muscle combined to make the project possible in the late 20th century

by Drew Fetherston For centuries people looked across the English Channel and dreamed of new ways to traverse its turbulen. But not until 1987, when construction of the channel tunnel (popularly dubbed the Chunnel) began in earnest, did any plan get beyond the drawing board. Newsday business writer Drew Fetherston tells the story of how the Chunnel was dug, exploring the extraordinary technical demands, political sensitivities and diplomatic wrangling surrounding the task

Provides a definitive account of the building of the Channel Tunnel that links England and France under the English Channel, detailing the engineering accomplishments, financial intrigues, and construction that created a triumph of human technological ingenuity. 15,000 first printing.
Reviews: 7
Zulkigis
There are a number of books on the project to build the Chunnel, and I've read most of them. Many have a lot of value, but if you have time for just one, this is it.

I see a lot of complaints about how complicated Featherston's story is, and they are understandable. I've been involved is several projects on this scale, and the size and sheer number of moving parts is enough to make your head hurt. Featherston makes it as simple as possible, and no simpler. A simpler story is going to be a fairy tale that won't tell you what really happened.

Some people complain about the financial stuff, no doubt wanting to focus instead on the engineering. I'm an engineer and it's not hard for me to sympathize. But the resources have to come from somewhere, and mustering the resources for something like the Chunnel represents a problem so overwhelming that it has a major effect on the engineering, and vice-versa. The engineering and finance would each have gone differently if it had not been for the demands of the other.

The author is a reporter and he approaches it like a reporter, from the standpoints of the people involved. He got to know a number of them and brings them to life on the page, so you feel you know the person. It makes the story much more alive and easier to visualize. The problem is that the cast of characters is quite large, but that was the nature of the beast.

The book is filled with black-and-white photos and diagrams that do a lot to clarify many points.

My work has been on defense projects with government as the customer and it really is amazing how very similar this private-sector project is in general outline. All the problems I am all too used to are right here, and laid out in much greater detail than is possible in connection with a security-conscious defense program. This book is an eduction in big projects.

If you want a simple, attractive story there are several appealing books for young adults that should serve. If you want an in-depth look at the strictly engineering look to Engineering the Channel Tunnel, edited by Colin Kirkland, Eurotunnel's technical director. If you want a very deeply researched examination of the decision-making from the British perspective, based on access to the full government file, pick up The Official History of Britain and the Channel Tunnel (Government Official History Series) (which makes this book seem like a popular novel by comparision). But if you want the most comprehensible full account then this is it.
Daizil
so excited to find this volulme of the construction of the channel after our visit to London and GB!
mr.Mine
This book frustrated me to no end. I've always been curious about the complete story behind the building of the Channel Tunnel so buying this book was a no brainer. However, I was disappointed with it. The author perhaps spends a little too much time on the bureaucratic mess that was Eurotunnel and TML. There were so many people involved with building this tunnel that the author felt it necessary to include them all in the book. I couldn't keep anything straight. There were so many acronyms and opposing parties I felt like I was reading Anthony Beevor's account of the Spanish Civil War - so many acronyms they all just blend together to the point where you're completely lost and just don't care. I just didn't find the tussles over contracts, treaties, promises, share offerings, financing, etc that interesting and I struggled to get through this book. You can't accuse Drew of not being thorough. There are nuggets of interestingness in the book but overall, I would have preferred a book that focused on one or two 'characters' to drive a narrative of the construction of the tunnel. This just feels too much like an engineering textbook to interest me. That said, my one takeaway from this book is that it's amazing the damn tunnel was ever actually built judging by all the behind the scenes drama that took place before and during construction. The Chunnel is an amazing engineering achievement and an amazing human achievement.
Wenes
This book was obviously written by and for people in business. The reason I even looked at it was because my father worked for one of the major engineering companies involved in it, Bechtel. He also worked for Bechtel on the rather large catastrophe which is the highway under Boston. I think he liked the Chunnel better, though I am not sure how much he actually had to do with it. But he was and is proud of his participation with both this project and many of the fine project Bechtel has been involved with over the years as an engineer.

I read the parts that interested me, and skimmed over the rest. It's very dryly written. Definitely for the business inclined, and not the scientifically-inclined like me. I will continue to look for books on this topic that are more history and scientifically-written. Fetherston did include a few interesting historical pictures and photographs. It would be interesting to know what the British and the french think of this project 50 years from now. As an American, I wish the best for both countries in this endeavor...

Karen Sadler

Science Educator

Chemistry
Ylal
When I bought the book I was hoping this would be another classic like the Great Bridge by David McCullough. No way. It's a shame too as the Chunnel project was as great an engineering feat for our time as the Brooklyn Bridge was in its. The book, for me, was overwhelming in its details of who did what when, and mostly then it focusses primarily on the financial and political aspects of the project. It might make a good reference book, but unless your hobby is financing mammoth engineering projects, it is pretty grim.
The Chunnel has to be one of the most interesting and exciting engineering projects of the second half of the 20th Century and here it is just one big yawn.
David McCullough, we have a new project for you.