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ISBN:0801846722
Author: Professor Laura I. Stern
ISBN13: 978-0801846724
Title: The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence (The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science)
Format: mbr lit lrf txt
ePUB size: 1577 kb
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Language: English
Category: Europe
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press (January 1, 1994)
Pages: 312

The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence (The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science) by Professor Laura I. Stern



Laura I. Stern has rummaged very skillfully among the dusty documents of medieval and Renaissance trails and sentencings. Never before has the relationship of the judicial branch of government to the other branches and to the whole civis been so clear. Never before have the legal proceedings made so much sense. - Bibliotheque d'Humanisme et Renaissance.

Laura Ikins Stern, The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence, Baltimore-Londres, The Johns Hopkins University Press, The Johns Hopkins University Studies in historical and political science, 112th séries, I , 1994, XXIV-286 p. Jean Boutier. Brackett, John . Criminal Justice and Crime in Late Renaissance Florence, 1537-1609, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1992. 3. Cf. Becker, principalement Marvin, The Florentine Territorial State and civic Humanism in the Early Renaissance , dans Nicolai Rubinstein é. Florentine Studies, Londres, 1968, pp. 109–139. 4. Zorzi, Andréa, L'amministrazione délia giustizia pénale nella Repubblica florentina.

Series Statement: The Johns Hopkins University studies in historical and political science ; 112th se. 1. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Formatted Contents Note: 1. Introduction: The Judicial System and the Territorial State 2. Inquisition Procedure and the General Powers of the Foreign Rectors. Inquisition Procedure. General Powers of the Foreign Rectors. Summary, et. Historians of medieval and Renaissance Italy have long held that the Florentine republic fell victim to rule by oligarchy in the early fifteenth century. Now, in the first complete analysis of the criminal law system of Florence during this crucial period, Laura Ikins Stern argues that the vitality of Florentine legal institutions gives evidence of a centralized state bureaucracy strong enough to thwart the early development of a ruling oligarchy.

Book analyzing the law system of Florence, Italy during the Italian Renaissance; specifically it outlines the structure of the government, offices, and philosophies of governing. Added Title: The John's Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science 112th Series (1994). Book analyzing the law system of Florence, Italy during the Italian Renaissance; specifically it outlines the structure of the government, offices, and philosophies of governing. Index starts on page 281. Physical Description.

Historians of medieval and Renaissance Italy have long held that the Florentine Republic fell victim to rule by oligarchy in the early 15th century. This book offers an analysis of the criminal law system of Florence during this crucial period, arguing that the vitality of Florentine legal institutions gives evidence of a centralized state bureaucracy strong enough to thwart the early development of a ruling oligarchy.

Bibliographical note. The criminal law system of medieval and renaissance Florence. Faber, S. In: Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis, Vol. 110/1, 1997, p. 113-114. T1 - -. AU - Faber,S. N1 - The criminal law system of medieval and renaissance Florence.

The following information is specific to the subject of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Thesaurus linguae Latinae (Lipsiae: In aedibus B. G. Teubneri, 1900- ), in progress R-RMRR PA2361. The Idea of the Renaissance (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989) JFE 89-1720. Commencing with a study of Burckhardt’s analysis of the Renaissance, this work also examines the literature and philosophy of the period. Mee, Charles L. The Horizon Book of Daily Life in Renaissance Italy (New York: American Heritage Pub.

The Johns Hopkins University Press Baltimore. Source: The University of Kansas Cartographic Services, Darin Grauberger and Jonathan Thayn.

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Historians of medieval and Renaissance Italy have long held that the Florentine republic fell victim to rule by oligarchy in the early fifteenth century. Now, in the first complete analysis of the criminal law system of Florence during this crucial period, Laura Ikins Stern argues that the vitality of Florentine legal institutions gives evidence of a centralized state bureaucracy strong enough to thwart the early development of a ruling oligarchy.

Exploring the changing roles played by judicial officials as well as the evolution of Florentine government, Stern shows how these developments reflected broad-based change in society at large. From such primary documents as legal statutes and actual trial records, she provides a step-by-step explanation of trial procedure to offer a rare glimpse of inquisition methods in the secular world--from public fame initiation, through the weighing of various levels of proof, to the complex process of sentencing. And sheexplores the links between implementation of inquisition procedure, the development of the territorial state, and the struggle between republican institutions and the emerging oligarchy.

The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science.