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ISBN:0192814249
Author: Jan Morris
ISBN13: 978-0192814241
Title: Oxford Book of Oxford (Oxford paperbacks)
Format: lrf lit txt azw
ePUB size: 1899 kb
FB2 size: 1669 kb
DJVU size: 1163 kb
Language: English
Category: Europe
Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks (April 19, 1984)
Pages: 414

Oxford Book of Oxford (Oxford paperbacks) by Jan Morris



I enjoyed reading Jan Morris' book Oxford because he looked at both the good and not as good parts of this famous university town. I was a bit disappointed that Morris made no mention of C. S. Lewis of J. R. Tolkien or anything about the Inklings. However, I learned about a host of colorful characters like the Fellow who fed his pet jaguar live hamsters. Sep 17, 2009 Andrea Fuller rated it really liked it.

Start by marking The Oxford Book of Oxford as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The Oxford Book of Oxford.

Few cities,' Jan Morris observes, 'have been much more loved, loathed, and celebrated. A book of outstanding excellence, with a sweep of knowledge and a distinction of style such as I have never before encountered in a work of this sort. Brilliant alike in observation and imagination. brings the very stones of Oxford to life' Sunday Telegraph.

Series: Oxford Paperbacks. Paperback: 304 pages. Jan Morris's book is a celebration of this city so witty, so well informed, and so gripping that you may find it to be the best "travel book" you have ever read. A must for anglophiles, lovers of cities, lovers of literature, architecture, and history, and those fascinated by university life. 24 people found this helpful.

Oxford by Jan Morris (Paperback, 1988). Title: Oxford (Oxford Paperbacks) Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks ISBN 13: 9780192820655. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Press First issued as an Oxford University Press paperback 1987 All rights reserved.

This is a book about Oxford University. It is divided into periods, usually by centuries up to 1945. It consists of epigrams, poems, book excerpts and anecdotes about Oxford. I found it a very interesting book but I have always been interested in Oxford for no reason I can put my finger on. If you have no special interest in Oxford it is still fun to read. Important events in the history of the University are described and explained ( development of the college system, Magdalen's defiance of James II, Newman and the Oxford Movement), and its life and times are exalted or derided by writers ranging from Anthony Wood to Evelyn Waugh.

Read "Oxford" by Jan Morris with Rakuten Kobo. Few cities,' Jan Morris observes, 'have been much more loved, loathed, and celebrated. This book has become a classic.

In this entertaining and lively anthology, Jan Morris traces the history of the university from it foundation in the Middle Ages through to 1945, combining extracts from contemporary observers with her own linking commentary. Important events in the history of the University are described and explained ( development of the college system, Magdalen's defiance of James II, Newman and the Oxford Movement), and its life and times are exalted or derided by writers ranging from Anthony Wood to Evelyn Waugh. Unworldly scholars and eccentric dons walk these pages: characters like Benjamin Jowett, Sir Maurice Bowra and William Spooner, who ordered an undergraduate to `leave by the town drain', and coined Spoonerism. This book is intended for general readers interested in anthologies; students (from Oxford or other universities); anyone with an interest in Oxford University or institutional histories.
Reviews: 7
Rollers from Abdun
The book gave me an overall view of the the history and flavor of Oxford University before I left on a walking tour of The Thames River which included a stop at Oxford.
Yalone
This book is a favorite of Oxonions. There is a lot of information for anyone planning to visit Oxford, living in Oxford, or just wondering about it.
Vobei
The book was fine. I hate the surveys. If that’s not if information for you too bad
Āłł_Ÿøūrš
Thanks
Runemane
I'll be attending Oxford next year, and one of my professors recommended this book to me. It explains important (as well as unimportant yet interesting) developments in the campus, and it does so through primary documents such as speeches, letters, diaries, &c. The editor, Jan Morris, delivers excellent and brief introductions to each passage. This is an excellent book if you are doing research on any of the minor details of the campus and need primary research. It is not, however, the light summer reading my professor had me think it was. Instead of the beach, find some time to curl up with this text in a library, public or at home.
Samutilar
Open this book at random and you're pretty sure to hit on something witty or whimsical or even laugh-out-loud funny; crammed with great stories about titans such as Shelley, Wilde, Newman, C.S. Lewis, etc., as well as little-known, highly eccentric Oxford dons. Beautiful first-hand descriptions of the city itself in its many Arcadian manifestations, plus behind-the-scenes looks at a great, entrenched university adapting itself to an ever-changing world.
Bele
Jan Morris captures the history of Oxford with many delightful stories and quotes. The book is great because it takes you on a journey of Oxford through the ages. The dons, the students, formal hall, college rowing are all familiar to someone who have studied at Oxford. There are also things that current students may not be as familiar with such as the history of women in Oxford. This is a great read but I am disappointed that more recent stories are not collected from the newer colleges such as Lady Margaret Hall, St. Anthony's or Mansfield, etc. Overall, this is a highly enjoyable read.