» » Solferino 1859: The battle for Italy’s Freedom (Campaign)
Download Solferino 1859: The battle for Italy’s Freedom (Campaign) epub book
ISBN:1846033853
Author: Peter Dennis,Richard Brooks
ISBN13: 978-1846033858
Title: Solferino 1859: The battle for Italy’s Freedom (Campaign)
Format: doc azw txt lit
ePUB size: 1839 kb
FB2 size: 1568 kb
DJVU size: 1886 kb
Language: English
Category: Europe
Publisher: Osprey Publishing; 1St Edition edition (April 21, 2009)
Pages: 96

Solferino 1859: The battle for Italy’s Freedom (Campaign) by Peter Dennis,Richard Brooks



The battle of Solferino, fought on June 24, 1859, was the decisive action of the Franco-Austrian War. Fought near Lake Garda in northern Italy, it was the largest European battle since Leipzig in 1813 with over a quarter of a million combatants.

Richard Brooks does an able job of bringing this little known action to light. He covers the whole 1859 campaign, including Magenta and several minor actions, as well as Solferino; the result is a "campaign" book and not just a "battle" book. The book is well written and ably supported by excellent maps. I don't know why so many otherwise excellent military histories suffer from totally inadequate maps, but this is not a problem with Osprey books. The book flows along, with the author again setting the stage (both strategically and with a description of the battlefield) for the actual battles, which are covered in sufficient detail that I felt I really understood them.

Richard Brooks, Peter Dennis (Illustrator). In the presence of three crowned heads of state - Napoleon III of France, Emperor Franz-Joseph of Austria and Vic Osprey's Campaign title for the battle of Solferino (1859), which was the decisive action of the Franco-Austrian War. Former tax-inspector Richard Brooks reports for Private Eye on a range of subjects and has contributed to the Guardian, the BBC, and many other media outlets. With David Craig he was co-author of the bestselling Plundering the Public Sector.

We get a good look at the opposing. of Solferino, one of the bloodiest battles in the history of Italy, this battle took place on June 24, 1859. Solferino 1859 : The battle for Italy's freedom (Osprey Campaign.

Campaign 207. The Franco-Austrian War of 1859 was one of the most significant conflicts of the nineteenth century. Technologically it saw the first large-scale use of railways, which enabled the French to deploy a large army in northern Italy on only two weeks, and the first use of rifled artillery on the battlefield. Politically it was a key step towards to unification of Italy, while the weakness of Austria, revealed at Solferino, was to play a key part in the unification of Germany under Prussian leadership  . The text is support by excellent maps of the campaign, its early battles, the approach to Solferino and three maps of separate sections of the battle itself.

Author: Richard Brooks Peter Dennis. Der Mann von Solferino. The Battle for Skandia. The Battle for Tomorrow. The Battle for Christmas. THE BATTLE FOR SKANDIA RANGER‟S APPRENTICE BOOK IV JOHN FLANAGAN To Leonie, for always believing.

The battle of Solferino, fought during the Franco-Austrian War of 1859, was the largest European battle since Leipzig in 1813. In the presence of three crowned heads of state - Napoleon III of France, Emperor Franz-Joseph of Austria and Victor Emmanuel II of Piedmont-Sardinia (later the King of all Italy) - the armies clashed together in a bitterly fought contest that would leave more than 40,000 dead.

Campaign ; 207. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Geographic Name: Italy History War of 1859 Campaigns. Uniform Title: Campaign (Osprey Publishing) ; 207. Rubrics: Solferino, Battle of, Solferino, Italy, 1859. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Solferino 1859 : the battle that won Italy its independence, Richard Brooks ; illustrated by Peter Dennis.

Richard Brooks sets the scene with a well-detailed narrative of the events of the whole campaign, and despite the books title, covers the battles of Montebello, Magenta, and Malegnano as well as Solferino. Mr Brooks seems very aware of the importance of terrain in warfare and this shines through in his descriptions of the campaign and how the nature of the northern Italy, its rivers and canals, and its agriculture affected the battles. He examines the changing technology and how it affected the campaign. The use of the railways and steam ships to get the French army to Italy quickly.

Osprey's Campaign title for the battle of Solferino (1859), which was the decisive action of the Franco-Austrian War. Fought near Lake Garda in northern Italy, it was the largest European battle since Leipzig in 1813 with over a quarter of a million combatants. In the presence of three crowned heads of state - Napoleon III of France, Emperor Franz-Joseph of Austria and Victor Emmanuel II of Piedmont-Sardinia (later the King of all Italy) - the armies clashed in a bitterly fought contest that would leave more than 40,000 dead and give the battle a reputation for savagery that would inspire not only the formation of the Red Cross, but also the first Geneva Convention. As a crucial climax to the Second Italian War of Independence, this title covers the build-up to the battle, including actions at Montebello, Palestro and Magenta that led to the decisive moment of the campaign. Full-color battlescene artwork and detailed maps illustrate this comprehensive account of the commanders, armies, plans and aftermath of one of the bloodiest battles of the period.
Reviews: 7
Early Waffle
The Battle of Solferino occurred during the Second War of Italian Unification. The author, Richard Brooks does an excellent job of describing the campaign, albeit it from a mostly French point of view. He also covers the action at Montebello, at Palestro, the Battle of Magenta, and finally Solferino. The Battle of Solferino is further separated into three parts, San Martino della Battaglia, the French breakout in the center, and the French holding action in the south.

Sometimes, the narrative can be difficult to follow for anyone unfamiliar with the various military commanders. For example, the author states on pg. 65 that an assault was launched by Brigata Cuneo of Mollard's 3a Division. If the reader does not remember the identity of Mollard, they might have trouble determining if the author is referring to a French or Austrian unit. Fortunately, the book has a detailed Order of Battle that is crucial to identifying the units described in the text.

This confusing aspect of the narrative is the only negative part of the book. It is, however, effectively mitigated by an excellent selection of maps. The book has three 3D BEV maps and six 2D campaign maps. They are clearly marked, uncluttered, and easy to read. The text is further supported by numerous contemporary drawings.

Bottom line: This book is an excellent overview of the entire campaign across the Lombardy theater of war. The book lacks an Austrian perspective and the movement of individual units can be confusing for anyone unfamiliar with this conflict. That said, any confusion is quickly offset by the thorough coverage and excellent supporting graphics.
Kigul
Solferino is one of those battles that few people know anything about, except maybe who won, yet it led inexorably to the unification of Italy and the new style of warfare demonstrated in the American Civil War and the German Wars of Unification, not to mention being an interesting battle in its own right. Richard Brooks does an able job of bringing this little known action to light. He covers the whole 1859 campaign, including Magenta and several minor actions, as well as Solferino; the result is a "campaign" book and not just a "battle" book.

The book is well written and ably supported by excellent maps. I don't know why so many otherwise excellent military histories suffer from totally inadequate maps, but this is not a problem with Osprey books. The maps, with the way they help explain and supplement the narrative, are probably the best part of the book. Brooks sets the stage for the campaign well in a minimum number of pages, gives a detailed (and very necessary) order of battle, and then dives into the action. The book flows along, with the author again setting the stage (both strategically and with a description of the battlefield) for the actual battles, which are covered in sufficient detail that I felt I really understood them. This includes a number of minor incidents that adds some depth to the necessarily short narrative. He is, after all, limited to 96 pages.

The are some problems, the most notable being identification of the brigades and divisions. They are named after their commanders, but casualties among the officers (and some promotions) meant that they often changed names. The author is not always consistent about whether he uses the new name or the old one in the text and sometimes the names on the maps don't match up either. This means you have to keep going back to the order of battle (which goes from being useful to essential) to figure out which unit is which.

This is mostly just annoying until you come to the action on the southern flank at Magenta. A lot of Austrian units show up that I couldn't identify and the units in the text are often different than the ones on the map -- actually they seem to mostly be different. The French do much better, but a whole division doesn't make it onto the map; fortunately it doesn't really matter. The problem is made worse by a couple of issues. The narrative seems to lose some of its coherence at this point, with a lot of small incidents that don't come together to make a whole and some obviously missing pieces. The maps have critical events marked on them, which usually helps greatly in understanding the action, but this time many of the events described in the text don't make it onto the map. The general course of the action is clear enough, but the details aren't. The French defeated twice their number of Austrians. How exactly did they do it? Well, the Austrians committed their forces piecemeal, but I don't really know what they did with them when. Fresh masses of Austrian troops showed up late on the battlefield, but we aren't told who they were and where they come from.

This is why the book got fours stars instead of five. The rest of the book is well done and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I just wish that one piece was as good. Brooks draws some interesting conclusions, although his comment that the experiences of the 1859 campaign contradicted the lessons of the American Civil War misses the point. The Americans fought their first battles in a similar fashion to the French (who greatly influenced a number of key officers); it was only after hard experience that things changed.

I was very surprised by how well Napoleon III and his generals performed. To someone like me, who only knew them from the Franco-Prussian War, this was a shock. Napoleon III even performed a brilliant redeployment (using railroads) right under the nose of his opponent. I am guessing that age sapped their energy; it would have been nice if Brooks had given their ages. Granted, the Austrians weren't of the same caliber as the Germans in 1870, but they managed on occasion to give the Prussians a hard time in 1866, when their tactics were stupider and artillery (admittedly) better. Napoleon III recognized the shortcomings the war had revealed and tried to address them, but the army was uninterested and the politicians refused to provide more money to the army; an interesting commentary on the actual power of the Emperor in the Second Empire. Still, I can't help feeling that, if the Franco-Prussian War had occurred in 1860 instead of 1870, the result might have been very different.
Fecage
This is one of the best Osprey books I have ever read. It was very well written and gave a good description of the battle. I think my only problem that I really had was had about the book was it seemed to be favoring the French and the Italians more (which is a bit odd in the latter case because by themselves they never did good against the Austrians). Although I understand though that the French army overall was better then their foe and I have to put my bias aside (I'm a Austrian Empire fan). So overall, good book.
Querlaca
The 1859 Second Italian war of indepdence is not as well remembered as Napoleon or the Franco-Prussian war. but the June 1859 battle of Solfernio, a power struggle between the powers of France, Austria, and Sardinia was a bloody battle that led to the starting of the Red Cross. a good read.
Marige
nice book
Brakora
all okay.
Lonesome Orange Kid
I would be glad to review this book,but it did not arrive yet.
Can you do something to control where the book is?
Thanks,GdeG