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Download New Worlds, Lost Worlds: The Rule of the Tudors, 1485-1603 epub book
ISBN:0142001252
Author: Susan Brigden
ISBN13: 978-0142001257
Title: New Worlds, Lost Worlds: The Rule of the Tudors, 1485-1603
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ePUB size: 1625 kb
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Language: English
Category: Europe
Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (September 24, 2002)
Pages: 448

New Worlds, Lost Worlds: The Rule of the Tudors, 1485-1603 by Susan Brigden



Susan Brigden's book is a wonderful corrective to this, providing an overview of the whole period, from the grey penury of Henry VII through to the dog days of Elizabeth's reign. In fact, I'd say this is the best one volume history of the Tudors that I've read. Brigden is particularly good on the religious upheavals that made the Tudor era the definitive break between medieval and modern eras, and the revolution in world views that brought about and was caused by these changes.

New Worlds, Lost Worlds brings the atmosphere and events of this great epoch to life. Exploring the underlying religious motivations for the savage violence and turbulence of the period-from Henry VIII's break with Rome to the overwhelming threat of the Spanish Armada-Susan Brigden investigates the actions and influences of such near-mythical figures as Elizabeth I, Thomas More, Bloody Mary, and Sir Walter Raleigh.

Personal Name: Brigden, Susan, 1951-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book New worlds, lost worlds : the rule of the Tudors, 1485-1603, Susan Brigden.

Susan Brigden's book is a wonderful corrective to this, providing an overview of the whole period, from the grey penury of Henry VII through to the dog days of Elizabeth's reign.

New Worlds, Lost Worlds" is part of the Penguin History of Britain series, meaning that it should stand alone as a history of the relevant period, the Tudor period, 1485-1603. I do not think it does this. It has some strong elements - Brigden's presentation is very good with regard to religious history, and at showing how each Tudor monarch related to key political actors, mainly the aristocratic class. But in terms of military, economic and some aspects of the political system, it is not what I hoped.

Penguin History of Britain - New Worlds, Lost Worlds the Rule of the Tudors. Download (epub, . 7 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

At least two generations of young minds were introduced to the tensions and challenges that characterized life in England during the sixteenth century in S. T. Bindoff's Tudor England (1950). Now his classic work has a worthy successor in Susan Brigden's New Worlds, Lost Worlds, which is the fifth volume in Penguin's new History of Britain series.

Author: Susan Brigden. Date: September, 2002. New Worlds, Lost Worlds brings the atmosphere and events of this great epoch to life.

Her subjects, awaiting a new reign with apprehensive impatience, both hoped and feared that she would live so long. 35 The cult of the Virgin Queen of England usurped the veneration of the Virgin Queen of Heaventu Elizabeth’s own birthday was celebrated instead of the feast of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary. 36 She presented herself, and was presented, as changeless

Fellow and Tutor in Modern History Susan Brigden. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. New Worlds, Lost Worlds : The Rule of the Tudors, 1485-1603. Fellow and Tutor in Modern History Susan Brigden. Book Format: Choose an option.

No period in British history has more resonance and mystery today than the sixteenth century. New Worlds, Lost Worlds brings the atmosphere and events of this great epoch to life. Exploring the underlying religious motivations for the savage violence and turbulence of the period-from Henry VIII's break with Rome to the overwhelming threat of the Spanish Armada-Susan Brigden investigates the actions and influences of such near-mythical figures as Elizabeth I, Thomas More, Bloody Mary, and Sir Walter Raleigh. Authoritative and accessible, New Worlds, Lost Worlds, the latest in the Penguin History of Britain series, provides a superb introduction to one of the most important, compelling, and intriguing periods in the history of the Western world.
Reviews: 7
Whitegrove
Not a page turner, but if you have an existing interest in the subject, worth the effort. Much of the book concerns the peripheral subjects... Ireland, Wales, Scotland, Holland, France, Spain, the Pope. The common people of England are also examined, as they struggled with famine, plague, loss of land, and the shifting tsunamis of the religious world. Thus the motives of the powerful people around the English throne in the 1500s are brightly illuminated. Those "common knowledge" high points of history are brought into sharper focus by the detail provided of occurrences between the landmark events.
Very Old Chap
Good Reading
Dolid
Others have written that this book is not a page-turner, but I respectfully disagree. Once started, I took this book with me everywhere I went so that I could continue reading every time a few spare minutes came along. Brigden's work is so carefully organized that my reading didn't seem to suffer at all from my piecemeal approach. I agree that there is a not a lot of heavy didacticism in Brigden's analysis, but I appreciate having the wealth of information she presents organized in such a way that I can readily see connections between people and events and draw my own conclusions.
Delari
This book is great if you're a history major! If you're not, then it'll be a bit hard to understand (like me).
Early Waffle
I bought "New Worlds, Lost Worlds" many years ago and have tried since then to read it from cover to cover, without much success. I am a graduate student in History, and have always had a love for the Tudor Era, and thought I would find this an easy read. It is absolutely a great text for an intro class in the topic, it compacts a great deal of info into a fairly short space, but it is not the best text for reading on one's own.

Where this book has shined, however, is in the writing of a number of papers on topics relating to Tudor England. One such example was a paper on whether or not the English conquest of Ireland between 1565 and 1605 was a genocide or not. This book proved invaluable to me, along side John Guy's "Tudor England", as it had many direct quotes and presented the information in a way which helped me write my paper. Since then, it is the first book I go to when writing a Tudor-related paper, and it always proves its merit as a research tool.

If you are a student and plan on writing and researching the Tudor era, I would absolutely recommend this book. If you are looking for a basic intro on the Tudors to read on your own, I admit there are better options!
Vishura
"New Worlds, Lost Worlds" is part of the Penguin History of Britain series, meaning that it should stand alone as a history of the relevant period, the Tudor period, 1485-1603. I do not think it does this. It has some strong elements - Brigden's presentation is very good with regard to religious history, and at showing how each Tudor monarch related to key political actors, mainly the aristocratic class. But in terms of military, economic and some aspects of the political system, it is not what I hoped.

Readers who come to this book without a good sense of the narrative structure of the Tudor period will probably not leave it with one. It helped me that I had read a more general narrative history (Rebecca Fraser's `The Story of Britain'), and I would only recommend this book to someone who already understands the grand narrative. I think the problem is one of integration - there are scattered references to economic trends and discontents, hundreds of political actors appearing out of nowhere, lots of detail on religious schisms and struggles, but no integrated picture. Individuals are introduced as representing this faction or that, at times parliament pops up and does something, but one never understands who these people are, how these factions come to control parliament, and the like.

The lack of good maps may be part of the problem. There are only four: two related to Ireland, one of southwest England to illustrate Henry's march to Bosworth Field as he was to take his throne, and one related to the Spanish Armada. There isn't a single good map of England in the book. (I have the hardcover version.)

I am presuming that Brigden has some sort of subspecialty in Irish history, because there is a bewildering number of references to this clan or that, with nothing comparable for Wales or Scotland (granted the union hadn't happened yet, but this is a history of Britain, not England, and Ireland wasn't genuinely united with England yet either).