» » Dark Water: Art, Disaster, and Redemption in Florence
Download Dark Water: Art, Disaster, and Redemption in Florence epub book
ISBN:0767926498
Author: Robert Clark
ISBN13: 978-0767926492
Title: Dark Water: Art, Disaster, and Redemption in Florence
Format: lit doc lrf azw
ePUB size: 1370 kb
FB2 size: 1459 kb
DJVU size: 1459 kb
Language: English
Category: Europe
Publisher: Anchor (October 6, 2009)
Pages: 354

Dark Water: Art, Disaster, and Redemption in Florence by Robert Clark



Varying Form of Title: Art, disaster, and redemption in Florence. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Dark water : art, disaster, and redemption in Florence, Robert Clark.

Dark Water is not simply the best book yet about the flood that devastated Florence in November, 1966; it’s a new kind of art history–one that reflects on the transformation of a real Italian city (Firenze) into an imaginary city that’s become almost a museum of itself (Florence). Robert Hellenga, author of The Sixteen Pleasures. ROBERT CLARK is the author of the novels In the Deep Midwinter, Mr. White’s Confession, and Love Among the Ruins as well as the nonfiction books My Grandfather’s House, River of the West, and The Solace of Food: A Life of James Beard  . I was in Florence in 1970, 4 years after this disaster and the water marks were still fresh on the ancient stones. Robert Clark takes us thru this unified struggle against nature that allows Florence to live and breathe today. 3 people found this helpful.

In Dark Water: Art, Disaster, and Redemption in Florence, Robert Clark, the novelist from Seattle, weaves a story of the 1966 flood of Florence that attempts and, in a number of ways, succeeds in giving the reader a sense of the essence of the magnificent city of Florence and the importance of its art. But, this is not just an art history book. It is an enthralling tale that can, at times, provide just as many questions as it does answers, and this is a quality that makes it such a compelling re In Dark Water: Art, Disaster, and Redemption in Florence, Robert Clark, the novelist from Seattle,.

Some forty later, Dark Waters, by historian and author Robert Clark, remembers those dramatic days of the flood and the silver lining that came with them-the thousands of young volunteers who flocked to Florence from every corner of the world to help rescue the city and its artistic treasures, quickly earning the nickname of Angeli del Fango, mud angels. It was by chance that America-born Clark became aware of the flood and what it really meant

Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in the City of Masterpieces. Shadow About Blog Privacy Terms of Use Contact Us Advertising Disclosure.

ROBERT CLARK is the author of the novels In the Deep Midwinter, Mr. White’s Confession, and Love Among the Ruins, as well as the nonfiction books My Grandfather’s House, River of the West, and The Solace of Food: A Life of James Beard. He divides his time between Seattle and Florence.

But I know more now, thanks to Robert Clark’s Dark Water. In 2005, Clark and his family had been living in Florence for two months. On one seemingly ordinary day, he embarked on that most prosaic of errands: bill paying, which in this instance had to be done at the local post office. There is no way that I can do justice in this space to this book, a riveting combination of historical writing, art criticism, and disaster narration. For me personally, reading Dark Water was an intensely meaningful experience. But I also believe that it is a masterwork in its own right.

Dark Water : Art, Disaster, and Redemption in Florence. Birthplace of Michelangelo and home to untold masterpieces, Florence is a city for art lovers. But on November 4, 1966, the rising waters of the Arno threatened to erase over seven centuries of history and human achievement. Now Robert Clark explores the Italian city's greatest flood and its aftermath through the voices of its witnesses.

Art, Disaster, and Redemption in Florence. ISBN-13: 9780767926492. Authors: Robert Clark. Now Robert Clark explores the Italian city’s greatest flood and its aftermath through the voices of its witnesses

Dark Water Art, Disaster, and Redemption in Florence Paperback Common.

Birthplace of Michelangelo and home to untold masterpieces, Florence is a city for art lovers. But on November 4, 1966, the rising waters of the Arno threatened to erase over seven centuries of history and human achievement. Now Robert Clark explores the Italian city’s greatest flood and its aftermath through the voices of its witnesses. Two American artists wade through the devastated beauty; a photographer stows away on an army helicopter to witness the tragedy first-hand; a British “mud angel” spends a month scraping mold from the world’s masterpieces; and, through it all, an author asks why art matters so very much to us, even in the face of overwhelming disaster.
Reviews: 7
Brakora
When I was nine years old I saw pictures in the old Life magazine of a terrible flood that had just devastated an Italian city I had never heard of: Florence. Although I knew nothing of the masterpieces that had been damaged or destroyed, I realized that the world had suffered a great loss. Eight years later, as a teenager making my first trip to Europe, I visited Florence and saw the massive recovery and restoration efforts still underway. Florence meant more to me then, as I had just studied the Renaissance, and in the years since I have come to realize how important that rather small Italian city has been to the world's artistic, literary and spiritual development. Robert Clark's Dark Water is an excellent history of the city of Florence through the centuries, culminating with the 1966 flood and the subsequent recovery.

If Clark had only focused on 1966 and afterwards, this would still be an important work, but Dark Water is still more valuable because Clark has produced a fine history of the city, beginning with Dante, proceeding through the Renaissance, and on through to the present. He provides many excellent short biographies of the creative spirits associated with Florence, ranging from Leonardo and Michelangelo through to David Lees and Bernard Berenson. His accounts of Florence's participation in and witnessing of hundreds of years of history are also fascinating, particularly his coverage of the World War II period and the efforts made to preserve the city's treasures in the middle of massive conflict. His description of the 1966 flood and its aftermath is a gripping almost minute by minute account, and again features many hitherto unknown heroes of the recovery effort.

It would have been nice to have illustrations of the many artworks mentioned in this work and portraits of the many heroes and heroines who figure in Florence's history, and the book badly needs an index as well, but these are minor flaws, particularly when one considers Clark's fine writing style and his ability to create an engrossing narrative.
Mall
... for anyone with even the most passing interest in Florence and Italian art and art history. The book is sweeping in its multiple levels comprising: a history of Florence; biographies of some key people in her history including as recently as Bernard Berenson; a dramatic account of the flood in which the Arno becomes an alive, humanoid beast; reflections on "Florence" as romanticized by art lovers and "Firenze" as lived in day-by-day by its savvy cynical citizens; descriptions and ruminations about art restoration; a paean to the legions of young "mud angels" (angeli del fango) who descended on the city to help in the cleanup; enshrinement for history of other unsung heroes - and victims - and much more, not least the author's lucid, poetic prose. I don't give the book a fifth star for two reasons. As others have noted, it cries for more illustrations, and maps, for example of the Arno's whole course. And organizationally the book does jump around somewhat. But it is so rich that it is, again, a must-read. By instilling a new awe and reverence in the reader for that city's storied history - as well as for the irrepressible Florentines - it makes Florence "yours."

Reviewers note: I served in the U.S. Navy in Italy in 1965-67 and had the opportunity to visit Florence multiple times including for New Year's 1967 a few weeks after the flood. Even then the aftermath-situation was dramatic especially in the low-lying Santa Croce quarter. Piazza della Signoria was by then pretty cleaned up and the Palazzo Vecchio's windows were illuminated top to bottom with candles. At the stroke of midnight Il Duomo's big bell boomed and echoed from Giotto's Campanile down the quiet streets. Florence lived on. An unforgettable experience.
Paxondano
When people think about water threatening an Italian city, they think of Venice. The River Arno and ceaseless rains have been a disastrous threat to the Renaissance jewel that is Florence since 1333, when records of flooding commenced. In November of 1966 flood waters gushed over the altar in the Duomo, Santa Croce was inundated with 20'of mud and water; a population in peril. Florence was literally drowning in despair, in mourning for lost lives and lost masterpieces,and then the "mud angels" arrived from all over the world to help save the florentine birthrite. I was in Florence in 1970, 4 years after this disaster and the water marks were still fresh on the ancient stones. Robert Clark takes us thru this unified struggle against nature that allows Florence to live and breathe today.
Antuiserum
Interesting story, and not just about the flood. It was amazing to read this book while visiting Florence for six weeks as I could visit in person the places the author described. It really made the history come alive for me and I learned much more about the city, and about Italy, than I would have otherwise. I will re-read it to bring back great memories of my visit. If you are visiting Florence or just have an interest in Italy, I recommend this book.
Felolv
I read this book several years ago and loved it so much that I've just picked it up again. I love the way it morphs from one kind of reporting to another--or, to be more accurate, it contains a lovely blend of biography, history, and memoir. I love the epic scope of the work. I love its detail, the feeling it gives me that I'm actually living in Florence, that I'm watching as great art is restored. I love the English prose. Robert Clark is a consummate writer, one of the great twenty-first century masters of the language.
Daizil
Been to or going to Florence? Then this is a must read. It will help to prepare you to better understand one important aspect of Florentine life: the floods over the centuries. And the floods each time changed Florence. Never for the good.