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ISBN:8189487442
Author: Shireen Moosvi
ISBN13: 978-8189487447
Title: 1857: Facets of the Great Revolt
Format: lrf mobi lit mbr
ePUB size: 1578 kb
FB2 size: 1267 kb
DJVU size: 1593 kb
Language: English
Category: Asia
Publisher: Tulika Books (May 1, 2010)
Pages: 164

1857: Facets of the Great Revolt by Shireen Moosvi



India History Sepoy Rebellion, 1857-1858. Personal Name: Moosvi, Shireen, 1948-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

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The Revolt of 1857 is being increasingly recognized as one of the major events of the nineteenth century, a turning point in the history of imperialism. The sheer scale of the uprising and its unique place in the narrative of anti-colonial resistance has prompted it to be interpreted on several occasions in the past - by nationalist leaders, historians and officials - and the literature on 1857 has grown in volume as the country observed its 150th anniversary

The Economy of the Mughal Empire C. 1595: A Statistical Study. 1857: Facets of the Great Revolt.

Out of 1,35,000 Bengal army native soldiers, only 7,000 remained loyal to their British masters.

If you want to call Shireen Moosvi and Iqbal Hussain Hindu or Indian Nationalists, go right ahead I suppose. At over 700 pages, it goes into great detail, a lot of it graphic, so you need a strong stomach, particularly in the description of the massacre in the Bibhigar (Lady& House), and what those British officers saw when they looked into the well.

The Revolt of 1857 is one of those events which have been interpreted on several occasions by nationalist leaders, historians and officials. For one, here we have an uprising which for its sheer scale alone demands explanation, whatever view of history we may adopt. Then there is its unique place in the narrative of anti-colonial resistance. The Revolt of 1857 is being increasingly recognized as one of the major events of the nineteenth century, a turning point in the history of imperialism. The sheer scale of the uprising and its unique place in the narrative of anti-colonial resistance has prompted it to be interpreted on several occasions in the past by nationalist leaders, historians and officials and the literature on 1857 has grown in volume as the country observed its 150th anniversary.

In 1857, as the revolt spread around north India, Baqar changed the name of his newspaper from Dehli Urdu Akhbar to Akhbar-uz Zafar from July 12, 1857. This was meant to be a tribute to Bahadur Shah, whose penname was Zafar – the last Mughal in Delhi to whom the mutineers rallied. Shireen Moosvi rebutted the allegation that Baqar was trying to broker peace between the emperor and the British, an eventuality that was being prevented by Hakim Ahsanullah Khan, the prime minister. Moosvi wrote, Whether such a letter was actually sent by Baqar or not cannot be established; but the English, at least, did not treat him as their informer: he was seized and hanged, while Hakim Ahsanullah flourished.

The Revolt of 1857 is being increasingly recognized as one of the major events of the nineteenth century, a turning point in the history of imperialism. The sheer scale of the uprising and its unique place in the narrative of anti-colonial resistance has prompted it to be interpreted on several occasions in the past – by nationalist leaders, historians and officials – and the literature on 1857 has grown in volume as the country observed its 150th anniversary. Recently, there has been an increasing awareness of the need to study, in detail, the ideas of the Rebels regarding their own cause, the varied composition of their ranks and the different understandings of their legacy. The essays in this volume have been written essentially in response to this need, by scholars who have sought to explore much hitherto neglected material on that event. Readers will find much that is refreshing and provocative in this volume, and will get glimpses into the minds of the Rebels who belonged to different areas and classes, as well as their organizational capabilities and the problems they confronted during the Great Revolt.